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Discussion Starter #1
Ok... so from our local Australian breeder I get told that Australians are the best. However, I find it hard to believe that this is completly non-biased information since she would like for folks to buy her dogs.
If I have to choose between a dog with an F1B momma and a multi-gen Australian poppa and a pup that is an F1B..... to use in therapy sessions.... would it really make a difference if I got them at about 8 weeks and started them with training that young?
AND... how can I assess temperment of a pup when I visit them?
I am really curious about this and may very well do my master's project on the subject of therapy dogs.
Breeders.... owners... please advise.
 

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I'm sure breeders of a lot of dogs would tell you the same.

I have read that it doesnt matter the breed, its the temperment of the dog that really matters in the end and that is very hard to tell in an 8-10 week old puppy.

I would yahoo or google "therapy dogs" and do lots of research, I'm sure you will find some very good information and Therapy Dog organizations you can get first hand information from

Good luck !
 

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I agree with doing your homework first! Dogs like humans are individuals with distinct personalities. There are established techniques used to assess temperament. As stated on this forum, sometimes it's best to let the breeder guide/choose for you as they know their puppies the best.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
nono

No, don't worry... I would never try to raise two pups at such a young age at once.
I am just trying to figure out if there is any truth to the idea that the australians are the best for training and therapy work.
 

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I think I know why the breeder said Australian. Because Labradoodles are being bred to become service dogs, some breeders are keeping track of what dogs of theirs become service dogs, and some breeders are actually using their breeding dogs as Therapy dogs. I know among the Australian Labradoodles, there are certain lines that breed quality Therapy dogs, but that's it. There lines. So yes, they can breed Therapy Dogs, and its a bonus for them. But that's not to say that you can't get the same thing from lower generations. I just haven't found that the lower generations parents are as involved in Therapy work.

So, in conclusion, the reason why Australian Breeders say their dogs are therapy dogs is because they breed lines that have had past therapy dogs in. American breeders could claim the same thing, if their parents were therapy dogs. If that makes sense?

edit: I also ment to say that I would find a breeder who is well aware of the needs of therapy dogs, and if possible, a breeder who has therapy dogs, or knows that her pups have been therapy dogs.
 

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Always remember too, not all dogs make good therapy dogs even if they are raised from great tempered lines, there are always some that don't make it thru Therapy training and become therapy dogs, they just want to be loving pets

Raising 2 pups at once isnt that bad - I had 2 choc labs sisters from same litter and they actually were quite easy to train and 2 of the most well behaved dogs I have owned

Good luck in your search :D
 

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What is the difference between service and therapy dogs?
One of the reason's I picked out Marley's dad(Std. poodle) to stud to Tuesaday was that his
"direct offspring have become breeding stock (they have pet homes) for two different Guide dog organizations! The most successful Guide Dogs from Gus' offspring (grand-children) have been Labradoodles.
Several of his sons have become Service dogs...one is said to be able to sense seizures before the onset."
Yes, I believe some things are heriditary.
 

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Temperament, if I understand correctly, is heriditary through the father's side. I can only speak of Australians, because its what I have the most knowledge on, but there are lines steming from Cool Dude, and I know Tigger at Cherry Valley Labradoodles are two of the more popular therapy lines around. This isn't saying that EVERY dog from them are going to be therapy dogs, but you will have a better chance to see the temperament that is needed for such work in those lines. In addition, most of the breeders who are breeding specifically for that temperament (regardless of generation) will most likely have an idea as to what they're looking for in a pup. I wish I could put up a link to the video I have from Animal Planet's Breed all About It. They did an episode probably back in December / January about Labradors and the Seeing Eye Program. There is a distict temperament that a dog needs to do service work and they explained it well on the show.

I would say if you are serious about getting a Therapy dog, definetly look around and find one that can document they've had therapy dogs from their matches, and probably more than the odd ball.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
thanks

Hummm.... the idea that temperment is related more to the father than the mother is interesting.
To answer the other question about service dogs vs. therapy dogs....
Service dogs do work like leading the blind, assisting the disabled to actually perform work for them, identifying when children are about to have siezures or diabetic attacts, etc... They have protection under the Americans with Disabilities Act.
Therapy dogs work primarialy in hospitals and schools and camps to comfort and be a companion to those in difficult situations. They also serve as dogs in the read to a dog program and situations like that.
Therapy dogs are not protected under the ADA.
 
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