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Discussion Starter #1
how do you know if your dog has a tick or a skin tag? I will try and take the picture of it and post it. But I am worried. I have walked Cacao in the woods but not really deep. I am worried it could be something like a tick and not a skin tag. HELP!!!!!! I am worried.
 

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I actually thought Sampson has a skin tag last night and discovered it was a tick!

It wasn't bloated yet so it looked similar.
But it was greyish and felt kind of leathery yet slippery at the same time. And if you look very closely, you might see where the head burrows into the skin...
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Yucky!!!!! How do you get them off. I am going to google tick so I can see a picture of one.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Do ticks hurt them? (My husband will take it off when he gets home)
 

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Ticks carry diseases, like Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever and Limes. I'd take it off asap, the longer the ticks are on, the more toxins they pump in.

Yes, it will hurt some when it gets pulled out, but it's just a feeling of pulling hair. There is no pain when the tick is still attached. You don't know you have one until you see it or feel it crawling on your skin.

I hate ticks!! Yeww!!
 

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It is probably a tick. You can use tweezers, but get as close to the surface of the skin as possible...pull it straight out (they don't come out easily!)
Then put the tick in a tightly sealed jar with alcohol and get to the vet.
DO NOT use vasiline, or other methods to expect the tick to back out...they don't...and DO NOT twist the body, pull it straight out.
Your vet can arrange to test the tick, but the important thing is to start antibiotics ASAP. Whether or not your dog has contracted a tick borne disease, you will want antibiotics because that is what they would give you to fight any disease anyway. The sooner you get started, the better.
I'll write more, but want to get this off to you.
 

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ticks are pretty easy to remove -- finding them on your dog in the first place is the hard part! i use a pair of tweezers, and grab the tick as close to the skin as possible, right at the head of the tick. then just pull straight out. the tick may take a bit of skin with it. then put it in a covered container with alcohol right away. some people save the ticks in case they need to be tested later to find out if they carry any diseases. i also swab the bite area with alcohol and put some neosporin on it.

here's what the CDC has to say about removing a tick: http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/dvbid/Lyme/ld_tickremoval.htm

and here's a very informative article from the American Family Physician, which says ticks should be removed immediately -- the longer they're in there, the greater the risk of infection:
http://www.aafp.org/afp/20020815/643.html

-em
 

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Okay, now for more info...
Usually the pictures you see of ticks are when they are flat. They come in different sizes and colors. Some can be as tiny as a sesame seed. Some are more dangerous than others.
When the tick is attatched and start to engorge, they do look like skin tags. They get larger and rounder but are so firmly attached that they feel like part of your dog.
Often they come out of a small lump. It is important to remove them because of the danger of disease but also because the tick injects something to numb the site and it can sometimes cause paralysis (not lasting if you treat it asap.)
Do not handle the tick if you can help it. Wash your hands when you are finished and wash the removal tool. Then wash the site where it was embedded, use an antibiotic ointment to cleanse it regularly.
Your dog will probably get a small lump, but that does not mean you left the head. It is a good idea to see the vet because you do want antibiotics and you want them to look to be sure you removed it all. Also, if you give them the tick, they can send it to the lab to see if it tests as a carrier for disease. Since ticks carry many types of disease it is a good thing to do because the health department keeps records on tick infestions in your area and what type of, if any, disease they spread.
Now, you can buy tick removal kits. The best one I found is like a small, round, measuring spoon. It has a V shaped slit and you can slide it over the tick, roll it slightly and the tick comes out, into the spoon where you can dispose of it. If you use tweezers or other means, you risk crushing the tick and leaving parts in the dog...and also risk spreading disease.
If you do not take the tick to the vet...burn it! They do not drown, do not (usually) crush and will go on and live...using the blood from your dog to produce eggs.
I found all of this our the hard way...Bayley was running (escaped the yard) and when she came back she was covered in burrs, so I clipped her coat (she is black) and looked her over. She seemed fine. Days later, she got bumps near her eye and forehead...and then they started growing (what I thought at the time) looked like nipples! hahaha...I called the vet...took her in and they immediately said it was ticks...they pulled at least 10 of them off of her and I found 2 more at home!
The vet gave her a shot of antibiotics as well as oral antibitocs. They also gave her a shot of Benedryl since she had so many. I felt so guilty!
But, believe me, I know ticks now!
 

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Oh, and a word about prevention...
Advantix and Frontline work well ONCE THE TICK HAS EMBEDDED...to kill the tick and make it fall off, not able to produce eggs...but...it does NOT keep ticks off of your dog (or your bed, if you get my drift.) Be careful with Advantix because it is harmful to cats, if you have cats use Frontline on your dog. My vet told me that the best thing to do in heavily affected areas is to use the spot on treatments but to also put a collar on the dog while he/she is outdoors to repel ticks. You can remove the collar when the dog is inside. The collars sold cheaply online and in the stores does not work...you need to have a collar with Amitraz.
Now there are some people who claim that various homeopathic remedies work, but I have not found that to be the case. If you want to research it, look up "natural tick repellent" online and you will get a lot of info.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thank you all. I will only tell you guys. But I was so grossed out so I called my vet to see how to get it off. And they said they would do it for free. So guess what i did. I went to the vet and they got it out and I got some prevention stuff they had. Thanks so much. I was so grossed out. But I am good now. The tick is gone and I am going to wash my bedding now.
 

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They neighbor (in vet school) who pulled the tick off Sammy-Doodle last night said that if you rub them down with a towel every time they come inside, the towel will catch most ticks if they haven't embedded too far. Then she said to throw the towel int he dryer to kill the ticks. She said it works especially well if the Frontline has already killed them.
 

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to this day TICKS give me the willies

glad you brought Cacao into the vet :D

ticks and snakes....ewwwwwwww
 

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we freeked out 2 summers ago - we had just gotten Dex and we found a tick embedded in him. We did the same thing you did and brought him to the vet :) I'm glad they helped you.
 

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Deer Tick
All three active stages of the blacklegged / deer tick will feed on a variety of hosts including people. After the eggs hatch in the spring, the very tiny larvae feed primarily on white-footed mice or other small mammals. The following spring, the larvae molt into pinhead-sized, brown nymphs that will feed on mice, larger warm-blooded animals and people. In the fall, they molt into adults that feed primarily on deer, with the females laying eggs the following spring. Adults are reddish-brown and about 1/8-inch long (or about one-half the size of the more familiar female American dog tick).

These ticks are found in wooded areas along trails. The larvae and nymphs are active in the spring and early summer; adults may be active in both the spring and fall. The blacklegged / deer tick can transmit Lyme disease and possibly ehrlichiosis to humans.



American Dog tick
One of the most frequently encountered ticks is the American dog tick, also sometimes known as the wood tick. The larvae and nymphs feed on small warm-blooded animals such as mice and birds. The adult American dog tick will feed on humans and medium to large mammals such as raccoons and dogs.

Unfed males and females are reddish-brown and about 3/16-inch long. Females have a large silver-colored spot behind the head and will become ½-inch long after feeding or about the size of a small grape. Males have fine silver lines on the back and do not get much larger after feeding. Males are sometimes mistaken for other species of ticks because they appear so different from the female.

The American dog tick can transmit Rocky Mountain spotted fever, tularemia and possibly ehrlichiosis to humans.

 

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Good thing you don't live in NC- we have ticks all the time. I grew up in IN- so I'm pretty sure it must be the good freezes you get every year that kills 'em. I haven't picked one of the pup yet, but I would say I average about 10 per year off the kids (and we are not the hiking/camping types) we just get them from our little suburban 'hood. I do checks on the kids after every shower in the summer and keep my boys' hair buzzed, probably need to add Casey to the tick-checking line up as well. Oh and the husband is a pediatrician, so I hold the kid down, he does the actual plucking. I usually mark the spot and check back to see that it doesn't have a rash, etc....
 

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Your attitude about ticks sounds much like mine *As Good As It Gets*.
We see so many in a year that if we ran to the dr or vet for each one we'd go broke. My husband, father and son have all had lymes disease. So we pretty much know what to watch for. We remove them and go on till someone acts sick then go in for a test. Of the 3, only my Dad had the "bullseye rash" but all 3 ached just terribly from it.
 

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Same here Tink and "Good"! Growing up in SC, I've been around ticks all my life too (still thing they are gross!). Our neighborhood is pretty heavily wooded and close to a swamp, so we have had plenty of experience dealing with the nasty critters. If Tyke and I have been hiking on the Great Swamp trails, I always check us BOTH for ticks when we get back. MUCH easier to get rid of them before they embed themselves. I have found plenty on Tyke after a walk-just crawling around on top of that curly hair looking for a place to attach themselves! I generally pick those off using a Kleenex, and flush them! Tyke also wears Advantix, but checking after a walk has kept a lot of tics from actually biting her!
 

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Growing up on a midwest farm, I'm in the "meh" category for ticks too. They gross me out and I hate them. But you get to the point around here that summer is tick time, and you do body checks when you've been out, and pull the ticks out, and watch for a rash or flu symptoms after. I toss them in an ashtray and burn them. Here's a hint, if you throw them in the toilet and flush them, they can swim and come back to the surface. ack.

My ex got lyme's disease a few years ago after being out on his kayak. I pulled a tiny little seed tick from his back, and the next day he had the bullseye rash. He got treated quickly and had no ill effects.

Kevin came in from mushroom hunting yesterday and I told him to strip and put his clothes on the back porch, and then stand at attention for the mandatory tick check. He said "I think you are having too much fun with this" I said "nobody said I didn't enjoy my work" :lol: :lol: :lol:
 
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Just something about Advantix. I use it on Maya and I have a cat. I called Bayer the manufacturer and they told me its fine to use around cats as long as the cat doesn't groom the dog for at least 12 hours. I can't get the cat and dog in the same room together for 12 seconds so I think I am safe!
 

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Dextersmommy said:
Here's a hint, if you throw them in the toilet and flush them, they can swim and come back to the surface. ack.
YUCK! :shock: I think I will go back to burning them in the ashtray too - although Mom wouldn't let us do that when we were little! On the other hand, finding a burned up tick in the ashtray may be just what Mom needs to make her quit smoking LOL!!!! :wink:
 
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