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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My partner and I are wanting a Labradoodle - but I have a few small questions, am hoping that some of you experts and owners can answer.

My partner and I work full time, so we would be away from home for 9 or 10 hours during the day. The dog will be given plenty of attention when we are home - and we would walk the dog hopefully once a day.

- Are Labradoodles fairly independent - will they be happy amusing themselves during the day?

- Are they diggers? Would they spend the day digging up our garden? :)

- A once-a-day walk would obviously be best - but would a walk every second day be OK if we were unable to do it every day?

- Male or female - what is the difference (other than the obvious) - the males usually are cheaper. Is there a difference as far as temperament goes, or energy?

- "Inside" or "Outside" dog?

a) Inside dog? Would the Labradoodle be happiest spending as much of the time inside as possible, including sleeping maybe on a bed/basket in our living room? We would let the dog outside during the day (and probably have a kennel for it to snooze in), but invite it back in when we are home. I guess we would need to also let it out after dinner incase it needs to "relieve itself"?

b) Outside dog? Would the Labradoodle be happier spending most of its time outside (eg: a kennel to sleep in). We would let it inside in the evening when we are home - but send it out again at night time?


- My next question is more to do with the breeders/kennels. I have spoken to quite a few - but they come down to two types of breeders:

a) There are quite a few "Australian Labradoodle" breeders in my area, and from what I understand, they have very strict breeding guidelines, and have refined the breed to a high quality standard (to the point where they breed Labradoodles with Labradoodles to make what they hope to be officially recognised as "purebreds"), and are up to 9th generation. These dogs are quite expensive - close to $2000. These breeders warn against buying from kennels due to the lack of quality control, etc.

b) I also spoke to a dog breeding kennel (who seems to have fairly good references - I don't think they are a "puppy mill"). They breed many different types of dogs, including Labradoodles. Their Labradoodles are much cheaper - $600. This is more in our price range. This kennel told me not to believe the things I was told by the "Australian Labradoodle" breeders - and said that there are 12 known genetic health problems with what he called "inbred Labradoodles". I haven't been able to find any info on that other than his word.

So as you can tell I've been told two very different things. From the quality of the email replies I have gotten, all the "Australian Labradoodle" breeders seem FAR more professional - so my gut tells me that the "Australian Labradoodle" is the way to go - but I'm just concerned about the "12 genetic problems" that I was told about, and it is a shame the price is so much higher. I guess it is a case of "get what you pay for", especially with a long term investment of an animal...?


Thanks in advance!
Kim
 

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welcome and good luck with you upcoming doodle.

a couple of questions i can answer from experience.....

on amusing themselves, if you consider total destruction of rugs, tiles, baseboards, anything that will fit in their mouths amusement, then yes.
they are very social, and will destroy anything if bored. frozen kongs help, crating, but not for 10 hours! maybe if you have a laundry room, or dog proof area.

diggers, yes. Jonah was a great help when i was planting daffodil bulbs. unfortunately, not where i planned on planting them :shock:

Jonah is at his best if he gets 2 walks a day. a tired doodle is a good doodle! of course there are days he gets none and we pay for that.

they are a where ever you are dog. if you're outside, thats where they want to be, and vise versa.

they are great dogs, easy to train , very smart and loving. they do take some work, but every moment good and bad is worth it. i wouldn't trade Jonah for a million bucks!! :lol:
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Ahh, thanks for the info :) Would that be the case with all Labradoodles, or would it depend on each dogs personality, etc? I suppose we might have to get used to having a few holes around the place :) We have a laundry where we could keep the dog, but don't really like the idea of having him confined to one spot while we are away... we'd rather a few holes in the yard and a happy dog, I guess :)
 

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Try and stay away from a breeder that has a lot of Field Trial Blood in their dogs lines. These dogs (Labs) are raised and bred to run Field Trials so they are very very hyper, bouncing off the wall hyper energitic hyper. Now I'm not saying that all are like this but the majority of Labs that have Field Trial Blood are, just to make that clear and not make someone mad for saying this. These do not make good average dogs for families, and breeders should not be using these Labs crossed with Poodles to make Our Great Labradoodles. Just my thoughts!!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for the advice Gracielou - what are Field Trials? How would I find out if the breeder uses these dogs - just ask? (would they be offended?)

Cheers,
Kim
 

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No not if you approach it right usually it shows in the way the dog looks and the pedigree if they have a lot of Field Trial they will have won Field Trials and will have in Red print AFC or FC AFC before their names or it will have NAFC FC before the name these all will be in RED to show up easier. In apperance this dogs are usually longer legged, narrow head, and much thinner dogs than your average Lab. So if someone has F1's just ask do you have Field Trail Blood don't act like your against it and they will probably speak up and say yes we do. Turn and run run fast.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Ahh ok, i'm not sure if many of the breeders here in in Australia would have Field Trial blood in their breeding dogs. Some of the local websites I have looked at emphasise that the dogs are bred in a home/family environment to encourage friendly, healthy, family dogs...
 
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Hi Kim!
I am by no means an expert so take everything I say, review it and keep what you like :lol:
I would try very hard to have a daily walk for the first year. Puppies have abundant energy and really need the social interaction too. After a year, maybe you could go to every other day?
My F1 does not dig often. Occasional digging to try and get the chipmunks. This might be a trait in some and not others.
Not sure about temperament for male vs female. I'm sure the breeders of the forum will chime in here.
Definitely an inside dog with lots of playtime outside during the day. They want to be with their family.
There is another type of breeder in addition to the ones you have found. There are breeders who take their breeding very seriously and test for genetic disease in the parents. They are not necessarily breeding 9th generation and may even be breeding F1 (first generation). It is the testing that is done and the health warranty that makes a breeder good. They also will breed for temperament, which will be important in your case.
I would be cautious when a breeder produces many different breeds.
I would try to get a puppy when you are able to take some time off and train it. Because training a puppy is so time intensive, maybe you would want to consider a rehome of an older Labradoodle. In these cases you can meet the dog and know exactly what you are getting. If you ask the breeders you are already talking to, they may have some leads for you. Some breeders will sell their older stock because they can no longer be bred.
Good Luck
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Hi Linda,

Thanks for your reply! We will be able to take 2 or 3 weeks off when we get the puppy - so hopefully that is enough time to give it some basic training and also get it comfortable with its new home.

An inside dog is good - thats what we were hoping. However, as we don't have a dog-door in any of our exteror doors, do you think we would need to get one (so the dog can come and go as it pleases). Or is it quite easy to learn the habbit of the dog's toilet habits - so we know when to let it go outside, etc. (eg: after dinner/before bed).

Thanks again,
Kim :)
 

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Hello Kim and welcome :) You have asked some very important questions. First off, I would be leerie of a kennel that breeds several different breeds besides the Labradoodle and is asking bottom dollar for their Labradoodles. You will find a wide range of prices on Labradoodles, depending on the generation of the Labradoodle. A multi-generation Labradoodle will sell for 2500.00, this is not uncommon. A first generation Labradoodle can be found for 800.00 and up. It just depends on what specifically you are looking for in a Labradoodle. These breeders spend thousands of dollars on health testing their breeding stock and take great pride in making sure that health and temperament are the most important qualities when breeding.

I would be concerned about leaving a puppy for 9-10 hrs a day. You could make it work if you have family or someone that could come and feed the pup at noon and take it for a walk and spend some time with him/her. Another thing you could consider is enrolling your pup in a doggie daycare while you are at work. I have heard some great things about doggie daycares. The pup usually needs to be 16 wks old before they can attend a daycare since they need to have all their puppy shots first. A bored puppy is a destructive puppy. The Labradoodle does not do well when left alone to entertain themselves for hours at a time. I would never recommend a Labradoodle as an outside dog. They love being involved with family and are a very loving, devoted animal.

Good luck and let us know how it works out.
 

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Hi there, I agree with Dixiedi about taking your puppy to doggy daycare or hiring someone to come in during the day to walk the dog and spend some time with it. Dogs are social pack animals and get very lonely and bored all by themselves. They can develop some bad behaviors when left to their own devices for very long. Where there is a will, there is a way, as long as you are aware of the time, attention and commitment it takes to have a dog.

Best wishes on making your decision. :D
 

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I have an F1 (1st generation) labradoodle resue. I've had other dogs & am happy to share my experience with you.

- Are Labradoodles fairly independent? If I leave my doodle all day, she has to have an extra long exercise session when I come home to calm down to sleep at night. If not, she barks (in the middle of the night) for me to get up and play. I just plan for it. Day-care is a great idea. Beware of some dog walkers - you may not get what you pay for.

- Are they diggers? I fill up the holes in my yard once a month. If you have a specific garden area, maybe an electric fence will work.

- would a walk every second day be OK if we were unable to do it every day? 2x a day is better than 1x a day1, 3x is better than 2x, etc. . . 1 morning walk + 1 hour crazy play time in the evening is best of all! A young doodle MUST have alot of exercise.

- Male or female - Is there a difference as far as temperament goes, or energy? I've noticed the doodles seem to have fairly consistent personalities. Goofy, loving, playful, sometimes destructive, smart, Check out "Doodle Quirks." Is My Doddle Dumb (i think) is pretty instructive too.

- "Inside" or "Outside" dog? It's my understanding some doodles are apartment dwellers and do just fine. I do know my doodle LOVES to get dirty (seems others do too from the pics) so I would never get a dog door.

We've had several mutts, couple of labs, german shephard, doberwoman, collie, german short haired point, terrier mix & Lizzie is the most relaxed, trusting, sweet, funny, occasionally willful dog we've had.

Good luck with your doodle!!

LizziesMom
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I am not an expert by any means--but might have a few suggestions you might find helpful. We became Doodle owners about four months ago when we adopted 2 year old siblings--Lizzie and Louie. They came from a wonderful first home--but needed to be placed when their owner became ill. Adopting older dogs has been a real blessing. They are well trained and past alot of the puppy stage stuff--but still very playfull. The previous owners were able to fill us in on their little quirks and things. They are also able to be alone longer then a puppy would. So....from my experience I would consider adopting a older doodle--looking for a new home. However.....we have found they need lots and lots of attention...and lots of exercise. I have heard that doodles will do well in an apartment setting--with regular walks...but that would never had worked with these two. They delight in running and playing and love to be outside--although I would never leave them outside if we we not home. If we are going to be away from home more then six hours or so--I have someone come in to let them out for a short while. Everyone falls in love with a Labradoodle---so it has been easy to enlist help from extended family!!! If you can work out all the particulars and find the right doodle for you, you will be blessed many times over---they are wonderful dogs!!Good luck. Kathy, Lizzie and Louie
 

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Ruby will be 2 in Jaunary, and weighs 67 pounds. We have invisible fence, so she has 3/4 acre to run. She does dig holes in our yard, chasing moles; I prefer the holes to confining her. Ruby also has a doggie door into our back porch, which has a baseboard heater. I also am able to go home at lunch. She comes inside at night and sleeps in our room , sometines on our bed. I hide her Kong outside almost everyday which she loves. I'm always amazed at how fast she finds it. I can't say I walk her everyday, but I walk her occasionaly. Labradoodles are very smart dogs and easily trained, but will also "test you" and WILL get into mischief. However, their personality is something I can't even describe and we wouldn't trade Ruby for anything. I highly recommend Labradoodles, for anyone willing to "raise another child"

Russ
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Thanks all for the replies - very helpful! So if we go ahead, we might have quite a lifestyle change on our hands! :) Not a bad thing, though! :)

Cheers,
Kim
 
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