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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Has anyone had experience with electric fences? We are considering a regular fence but there is a considerable cost difference. I'm just not sure how I feel about shocking my dog. Several years ago we adopted an older dog and tried an electric fence. After one shock the dog was terrified to go into the backyard. Several homes in my neighborhood have them and they seem to be effective. I would appreciate any feedback.
 

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Hi Bmac,
The experience I've had with the underground fences is if your dog is extra smart (either that or brave!) they might figure out that the fence only shocks them once when they go over real fast. Then they are out and they won't go back in. We lived next to a couple of German Shepherds who did this. They spent a lot of time on our porch because they didn't want to go home. They were good once there, but that wasn't the intent of the owners! :wink:
However, My great uncle has one for his dog and it works great. I guess it's up to the dog. Can you try one out before you buy?
 

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We have one and it works quite well for Chester. It gives an audible tone before it shocks him. We also held it so we could feel the shock. It really just startles not hurts. (the funny one was when my husband had the collar in his jeans pocket) :lol: Chester has broken through it a few times before but that was with a strong desire to see his girlfriend. He knows when he is on his leash he can go through. If you live where there is a lot of wildlife remember these fences won't keep them out! All in all it was a good purchase for us. We (read, husband) installed it ourselves. The kits are available at Home Depot and he rented a trencher that laid out the cable. It was about $300 total.
 

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We have an electric fence and it works quite well. I was nervous about the shock also, but Fred learned very fast where his line is. All in all, it has vastly improved his and our life, since he can now be outside without an escort. He loves to lay in the front yard watching the goings on of the neighborhood. It was also easy to install--we just used a lawn edger to make a slice in the grass and a paint stirrer to push the wire in, and in the rough areas of the yard, we just layed it across the ground and secured it with stakes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I'm reading that you shouldn't start the training with the shock collar until at least 4 months. Is that the guideline that you have followed?
 

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I believe 4 months is correct. Also, there a little flags you put up that mark the perimeter of the fence as part of training so the dog will see those and hear the tone---I forgot to mention that part. I wonder if you could start the training as far as the flags go before you even start with the collar. Just a random thought.
 

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I am the queen of the underground fence! We have had ours since the doods were about 5months old. We have a farm in an area where dogs absolutely cannot roam free (sheep) and no way to fence properly. We love it! Doods get trained very quickly to listen for the tone and back away from the perimeter. After a while they just stay inside the safe area. We have about 2 acres in which they have free run, but they can't go outside. They do occassionally cross the line, usually because we have forgotten to put their receiver collars on or have forgotten to check the batteries. This is due to poor human training! WE have wildlife, who do get into the perimeter of course, but the doods won't chase them across the line. We spent a couple of weeks working with them to get them used to it at first. You gradually increase the temptations they learn to avoid. The static correction is NOT painful. It feels REALLY weird and like somethig you'd rather avoid. We found that our doods needed the collars that have an adjustable correction level and the longer prongs because the luscious doodle hair can interfere with the correction a little, but if you're willing to work with them a bit at first, and pay attention to things like changing batteries every so often, you'll be really happy with it. NOTE: It won't keep other dog OUT, so if part of your needs are to exclude other dogs, it won't work for you. (WE're way out in the country so other dogs coming by are pretty rare.)

WE learned how to install the fence without having to dig. If you are interested in this, send me a private message and I'll tell you how we did it......we "fenced" two acres in about 2 hours....!
 

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Just FYI I also am going to install an invsible fence as soon as it clears up and Murphy is a little older I ordered my system from drsfostersmith.com it covers 100 acres and cost me $200. Can't tell you anything about it but it looked a little nicer than the ones I found at the local Tractor Supply Company, let us know how it works
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Jamie,

I'm from Indiana as well. Did you happen to get your dog from the breeder in Dubois?
 

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bmac said:
Jamie,

I'm from Indiana as well. Did you happen to get your dog from the breeder in Dubois?
No, I got him from a couple in Ogleville, that is just south of Columbus if your not familiar with it. I live in Indy
 

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I love my electric fence but just had to upgrade to a better model. My Aussie ran through the fence and learned he could. The new fence has 5 different levels, and he recieves more than one shock if he crosses, it will also not allow him to stay in the beep zone, it will warn a few times and if he doesnt go back it will shock (he was hanging out in the beep zone to kill the batteries, than cross). This system also has an alarm that will sound if there is a break in the line, and a light on the collar that flashes if the battery is dull. It is called the Stubburn dog fencer, for stubburn dogs. He doesnt go near it. The shock is really not that bad and with the warning zone they never really even need to recieve the shock. I started to train my pup at 5 months and he only ever recieved one shock.
Good luck
tm
 

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I had been doing some research on the fences, I just purchased a PetSafe Wireless pet fence off of ebay and it should be delivered today. Our doodle is 5 months now.

You dont have to run anything under ground, you just plug the receiver in the house and adjust the perimeter up to 1/2 an acre, I believe (you can purchase an extra reciever for more coverage, and extra collars for more than one dog). The other thing that is different than the underground fences is that it does beep before the shock like those do, but if they go outside the perimeter...it will continually shock them until they get back in the yard......so you have to always remember to take the collar off when going out of the yard with the dog. It is portable, so you could take it with you as well on vacation or for long visits somewhere. I found 3 five star reviews on amazon when I checked to get some feedback, so I thought I would give it a try. I will let you know how it works out.
 

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The fence

That fence is working out great! I pretty much had him trained in about a half an hour. Setting up the flags was the hardest part, but he associates those with the boundary now. I am so glad and it was definitely worth the $260. He is spending more time outside now, he likes being able to roam without a leash or lead and he can be in the front yard too now without worry of him wandering to far near the street. I feel better too because we live in a small town and the dog warden is pretty strict when it comes to picking up dogs. Its an $85 dollar fine and you are charged with failure to confine a dog, you have to show up in court and your name gets printed in the paper :shock: .
 
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