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DNA test from PAWSITIVE ID- tests for...
"Congenital Hypothyroidism With Goiter
Hypothyroidism refers to any state in which thyroid hormone production is below normal. Thyroid hormones have an effect on virtually every organ system in the body. There are many disorders that result in hypothyroidism. The disease is transmitted as an autosomal recessive gene. The genetic or congenital hypothyroidism may exist in a carrier state in as many as 30% of normal Toy Fox Terriers. About 1 in 4 members of a litter are affected if both parents are carriers.

Symptoms of the disease usually are manifest as lethargy, mental dullness, inadequate wound healing, inferior skin and hair coat, including hair loss, increased appetite leading to obesity, cold intolerance (pups try to find warm places), or altered pigmentation. A lump (goiter) in the neck increases with age, even with treatment. The normal process of bone lengthening is delayed and is seen in the spine, legs and muzzle. Usually, affected animals die by the age of 3 or 4 weeks.

Treatment in standard cases of hypothyroidism consists by supplementing the daily diet with a thyroid hormone called L-thyroxine."

Dr. Dobbs thyroid function test(blood-T4, T3, Free T4, etc.)-
"These tests are useful in diagnosing increased (hyper) or decreased (hypo) functions of the thyroid gland.
As the name implies, thyroid tests evaluate the function of the thyroid gland. Too little thyroid hormone (hypothyroidism) is common in dogs whereas too much thyroid hormone (hyperthyroidism) is common in older cats. Because there is no single thyroid test that can diagnose all thyroid diseases in animals, several different thyroid tests are used to assure proper results (T4, T3, Free T4, etc.)."

What is the difference in these tests? Or is the difference genetic vs. say...enviromental?
 

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PAWsitive ID is a genetic test, ie is there a problem that can be passed on to puppies. the function test does not care why there is tyroid problem, it will get a positive result either way, a genetic problem or an aquired problem, so it will help you identify a dog that needs thyroid medicine, but not tell you if they should not be bred.
 

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Thankyou! I had to re-read it a few times, but it makes sence.
I am asking this because ALAA requires a yearly thyroid test (Complete Thyroid TgAA) to get their silver/gold PAWS reward.
If the dog has no genetic problem, I figured, why test the blood?
But since reading today, seems that the test picks up problems, from other diseases, that affect the thyroid too.
(How come I feel the urge to take a biology class next semester???) :? :roll:
 

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Lucky Me said:
DNA test from PAWSITIVE ID- tests for...
"Congenital Hypothyroidism With Goiter
Hypothyroidism refers to any state in which thyroid hormone production is below normal. Thyroid hormones have an effect on virtually every organ system in the body. There are many disorders that result in hypothyroidism. The disease is transmitted as an autosomal recessive gene. The genetic or congenital hypothyroidism may exist in a carrier state in as many as 30% of normal Toy Fox Terriers. About 1 in 4 members of a litter are affected if both parents are carriers.
I would read the bold part (my doing) as PID stating that there is a genetic component that can potentially be passed from generation to generation, and I don't see anything about environmental factors in the info above, or in Dr. Dodd's info.

Did I miss something?
 
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