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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
It only has happend with me. But, when I try to take something like a leash or toy away while we are out in the backyard, Biscuit, gives me a growl. Each time, I correct his behavior. But, it's getting worse instead of better. We are enrolled to start puppy kindergarten in two weeks. I am so scared that he's going to try to be dominant like our last dog.

He gets plenty of exercise and love. I try to use the theory from Caesar Milan; Exercise, discipline, affection. However, I have two daughters that always have the puppy in their arms. So, I think he gets plenty of affection.

If anyone has any suggestions I would love to hear them.

Thanks.
 

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I would try to stop the growling immediately! I was told you should always put your hands down around their food and try to take away things they are chewing on...to get them us to it. (also, to have your children do this..so the pup won't care if their hands are around food and other things they like) My pup growled at me when she had been given her first pigs ear. I specifically put my hands down to take it out of her mouth and she growled so I said no growling..and kept taking it away and then giving it back..till she didn't growl. I probably held her mouth shut tight and said no growling as well.
 

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I agree that the growling can't be allowed to continue. I would immediately take away the toy (if he won't let it go, trade him for another toy). Make sure the truly prized toy is out of sight for a while. Then I would work with him, teach him "drop, " give him a treat and/or praise, when he drops the toy. Do this a lot. Whenever a toy becomes so prized that he becomes territorial over it, get it out of sight until he's more under control. Keep training "drop".

In my experience some toys or chews bring out the territoriality in your dog. Observe which ones these are and only get them out when you are in full control. One growl, the toy disappears again.

One of my dogs, who was a mellow old sweety, just couldn't have pig ears because he became a different dog. After too many tries and couple of close calls I learned that he just wasn't ever going to be able to be around pig ears. Oh well, life is full of so many other things to chew on!

Good luck. Oh, also, Have you tried growling back? I tried this a few times and got sudden looks of pure surprise out of my doodles. It was a great way to defuse a potentially escalating situation but I would save it for special circumstances. Growling at your dog in public could produce unexpected results!
 

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I agree that the growling can't be allowed to continue. I would immediately take away the toy (if he won't let it go, trade him for another toy). Make sure the truly prized toy is out of sight for a while. Then I would work with him, teach him "drop, " give him a treat and/or praise, when he drops the toy. Do this a lot. Whenever a toy becomes so prized that he becomes territorial over it, get it out of sight until he's more under control. Keep training "drop".

In my experience some toys or chews bring out the territoriality in your dog. Observe which ones these are and only get them out when you are in full control. One growl, the toy disappears again.

One of my dogs, who was a mellow old sweety, just couldn't have pig ears because he became a different dog. After too many tries and couple of close calls I learned that he just wasn't ever going to be able to be around pig ears. Oh well, life is full of so many other things to chew on!

Good luck. Oh, also, Have you tried growling back? I tried this a few times and got sudden looks of pure surprise out of my doodles. It was a great way to defuse a potentially escalating situation but I would save it for special circumstances. Growling at your dog in public could produce unexpected results!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for all the advice. I decided not to give him his holey roller today outside. We just went out and putzed around the yard. He did growl at me again and I gave him a strong correction on the leash. It seemed to stop the behavior. I also gave him a correction last night when he was biting my kids. He stopped immediately. He has on a puppy collar, not a chain so it's a soft correction but enought to let him know that I am not joking! I think he just has to learn his place.

Thanks so much for the advice. I appreciate it.

Susan
 
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