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We brought home our F1 labradoodle Murphy last week, he is now 9 weeks old but we are having a terrible time with his biting. Sometimes it seems like he's teething, but then other times it seems he's being a bit agressive. We have tried everything, spray bottles, putting his toys immediately in his mouth we he starts to bite, yelping, "no biting" but he continues to do it. Any thoughts/advice?
 

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Our doodle, Kenai is also 9 weeks old, and we've had her 2 weeks. She bites a lot. I actually yelled at her once, "NO BITE", and since then she will immediately stop biting whenever I yell it. Also, if I'm standing, I stick my knee up to prevent her from reaching my body to bite it, while yelling NO BITE. I also stick toys in her mouth, or try to divert her attention somehow. I immediately praise her if she switches to licking, which she is doing more and more now.

I think consistency and repetition will eventually work. I do have scratches and bite marks all over my body, though! My husband got a good nip in the lip this morning as well. But he likes to get down on the floor and wrestle with her, so it's his own fault.

Good luck!
 

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My labradoodle Charlie has the same biting issue at times and he's 12 weeks old. We've done all the things you already listed and he is getting better at stopping. I don't like it at all so I have very little tolerance for him biting me or my clothes. One thing that I found that works the best is a very high pitched "eek!" followed by a "no bite!". That usually buys me enough time to get a toy and praise him for playing correctly. Hope this helps.
 

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One thing to keep in mind is that biting is very natural for puppies. They bite each other, they bite their mother, they bite everything...they explore by biting (much like a baby puts things in its mouth)...you see, puppies have no hands to use to explore its new world and they use their mouth...so they mean no harm. It does hurt, of course, and they do have sharp teeth, but they don't mean to hurt you.
The ideas you have been given are really good ones...we usually gently put our hands around the nose of the puppy and say "no bite" and always praise them for "good no bite" and also for "good kisses"...the puppy will want to please you but he has to learn how first.
I suggest that you go to puppy kindergarten as soon as you can.
Here is a good informationsal site:
http://www.veterinarypartner.com/Conten ... &C=0&A=452
And this is about biting: http://www.veterinarypartner.com/Conten ... C=0&A=1128
 

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Hi Cathy and Keni,

I really enjoyed your pictures. Keni is a real cutie!

I was wondering how it went with the biting. We got Lexi at about the same age. She is now 11 weeks. We are working very hard to get her to stop biting. At times it seems to be improving, but definately still a big issue.

Potty training, fetch, sit, lay down, all accomplished quickly and with ease, but the biting coninues to be an uphill battle.

How did it go with you?

Maddie
 

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Hello! Charlie is now 6 months old and he doesn't bite as often, but he does when he first sees us. He is so excited and happy that we are home (or when we pick him up from his grandmothers) that he basically puts his whole mouth around our arms. It's not a mean bite at all, but still, I don't like it. I want to show him I'm happy to see him too, but I feel like I'm constantly reprimanding him for the biting when we first greet. He's been to puppy class and will be enrolled in one in Feb (I'm waiting for a particular trainer). Any suggestions would be great.
 

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Yesterday I took Lexi to the vet.

He asked how she was doing, and I explained my issues with her biting.

He said this is absolutely typical puppy behavior, and not aggression, but it is very important to address it immediately.

He suggested time out in the crate for 10 minutes immediately following any bite. No attention for her whatsoever, with pleanty of love and praise at times when she is good.

Although I know the crate is not supposed to be used to punish, I intend to follow his advice, as getting this behavior under control is probably the most important training with her that I will ever do.

Besides "time- out" worked great with both my kids (now 13 and 17).

Lexi needs one more round of shots before we can go to puppy class, and then we will enroll there also.

If all else fails, I will hire a trainer.

Wish me luck....

Maddie
 
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