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Hello!

I'm a beautiful single white female who's very smart, loves to retrieve, loves people, house-trained, knows basic commands and am leash trained. I like long walks and runs, someone to play fetch with and a good ol' belly rub. If you are a responsible dog owner looking for a wonderful, loving companion...give me a call!

:lol: :lol: :lol:


LOL...I'm looking for a special family to be a Guardian home for my 1 yr old cream F1 Labradoodle, Lilly. She's great!

If you aren't familiar with "Guardian" homes, they are basically foster homes for dogs! =) I strongly believe that a dogs #1 job is to be a family pet and Guardian homes are a great way for me to continue using a dog in my program, yet ensures me that the dog is getting all the individual love and attention they need.

How it works....There are many details involved, but in short, I will place a dog with an approved (aka...wonderful, loving and responsible!) family for them to keep as their family pet, but I retain the breeding rights of the dog for a set number of litters (females)/years (males). All breeding expenses will be at my cost and once I am done using them in my program, the dog will need to be fixed and will continue to be your family pet! It's a great way to get a doodle at a much lower price and I offer a yearly compensation to help cover medical expenses and your extra efforts.

If you are interested, you can check out my web site or PM me!
 

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Megan, some people have that policy, but my pups are free to their guardian homes, and I believe that Julie is saying that she will, in addition, pay an annual compensation.

Guardianship is a trade off...the family provides the usual love, care, training but accepts a heavier burden for being part of the breeding program...the breeder entrusts the life/health of a very valuable breeding dog, including taking the risk of accidents, catestrophic vet bills, and health testing.

All the guardian pays for is the same that they would their own pet...nothing extra, but they get an excellent, often extremely valuable dog and the only real risk of losing the dog is if the breeder, the legal owner, has reason to believe and proof of neglect or abuse to the dog.
 

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Actually, this is a very common occurance. In fact, most responsible breeders that I have looked at utilize this arrangement to some extent. It allows breeding dogs to have more individualized attention as a family pet. The original poster of this message, Julie, has far fewer dogs in her home than many breeders - she is just looking to make sure that they all get the love and attention they deserve.

The 'getting a very valuable dog' part, meaning valuable from a breeding standpoint..not really a perk for the guardian.
No actually - I'm sure Jac was speaking of valuable as in actual purchase price and value to guardian home. There are many families that would be wonderful candidates for a doodle that just can't afford the original purchase price between $1800 - $2500 that these dogs sell for. This gives them a chance to get a dog that they could otherwise only dream of.

The guardian could never tell the breeder owner that they wished the dog not have any more litters (for whatever reason..not sure they would ever feel that way but if they did, it would hold no weight as they don't own the dog)
I can't imagine that "it would hold no weight." A responsible breeder has the well being of their breeding dogs in the front of their minds. If there was a medical reason that the guardian felt the dog should not be bred, I'm sure the breeder would take that into consideration.

As Jac stated, unless the breeder suspects abuse or neglect, they don't go around just pulling dogs from the guardian homes on a whim. This is an arrangement that is meant to be beneficial to both parties and is widely practiced in the US and Australia that I know of.
 

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Thank you so much Jac and Beth! :)

Megan, I can understand your reasons for questioning the program, but it can be a wonderful experience for both the family and the breeder. I genuinely want any dog in my program to be a family dog first, as I feel that is what they were meant to be, and to receive as much individual attention as possible. I am a very small breeder and have no desire to have a kennel, which is why I think the "Guardian" program is such a great idea. I do charge a very small fee initially for the dog to help weed out people contacting me just for a free dog but I also compensate the family yearly, which should more than cover basic medical bills, help with food, their extra efforts, etc. I also usually only breed my girls once a year, or 2-3 times total, so I'm not burdening the family too much and the dog has her/his whole life to enjoy as a member of the family.

As for having the option to take back the dog at anytime....I'm not sure where you got that from....at least I didn't state that in my post or on my blog. The dog legally or technically belongs to me on paper until I'm done with the breeding aspect, but in my heart, the dog belongs to the family. I can't think of a reason I would ask for the dog back, unless there was some horrible living situation, the family couldn't care for her as needed, etc. And I would most definitely be open to hearing their concerns if they thought the breeding should stop, etc. I'm not set on rules, rather having a great relationship with a family and seeing them love and enjoy a dog that I love too!

I hope that helps clear things up for you. Feel free to contact me if you have more questions!
 

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The breeder we bought Lucee and Rusty from in Australia has a guardian program called family care homes. You have to live within an hours drive and if you have a female they are normally desexed and retired after a maximum of three litters. This was one of the reasons we went with this breeder as it was nice to know your puppies were coming from dogs who were beloved family pets. There is a past litters page where you can see all the litters your parent dog has produced. Lucee and Rusty were both from first litters.

I think it is a great idea. The other way would be to have a breeding dog and then retire them and find a family for them. The care program means they have their family from the very start.
 

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Another important thing to consider (as to whether or not a breeder would allow more litters) is that the breeder is a professional. That is why they are breeders...they understand and accept the risks involved. A guardian family may well love their dog, and learn a great deal about breeding and a breeder may consider working with them on another litter, depending on the circumstances...but unless it was properly suprevised by the breeder, it could end up in disaster.
We trust our guardian families and have wonderful working relationships with them...but sometimes the family dynamics change and above all, my interest is in the safety and well being of my dogs...all of them...and I WILL remove a dog from a guardian home if that home is harmful to the dogs emotional or physical well being. But, that would be the only reason.
Still, when I pay $4000 to $6000 for a dog and place it in a home, with full agreement and cooperation of the family, then I do have expectations.
It is a contract like any other...you can take it or leave it. Many people take it and are thrilled with their bargain. Others, if they feel that they are being taken advantage of, will probably not be selected as a family anyway...so the issue will most likely not come up.
If the family does not like the terms of the guardianship, they need not apply. They are certainly welcome to purchase a pet puppy. (But they'd stil need to qualify.)
 
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