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Hi. I only recently discovered this board and signed up - but it's very helpful. I have message boards for my children's issues, but had no idea this existed for Labradoodles. Great Idea!!!

I'm curious if anyone can help me determine the best course of action for me. My children (2 and 3) have a ton of allergies, mostly food, but the doctor is suspecting environmental and animal as well. I know they reacted to several houses that had dogs...before we put them on allergy medicine. They are not reacting now - but I would love to one day get them off allergy medicine AND keep a dog. My mom has two toy poodles that they do fine with, whether on medicine or not - so I know a poodle is safe. However, I always had labs so I was hoping to get a mini Labradoodle that would work with everyone's issues.

On top of this, my son has a mitochondrial disease which includes speech delays and seizures. So I understand a companion dog could reap us additional benefits. Because of all the health issues, we spend an insane amount of money on medical food (his main nutrition is through formula) and medical bills.

I was thinking about waiting for a Labradoodle in a shelter - but after reading about the different "types" I'm afraid there would be no way to truly know what I was getting - and I think it's important to get a MultiGen or F1b.

So - here are my questions.
1. Does it sound like I really need to go with a puppy from a breeder (rather than shelter) to make sure I have the best chance with allergy issues.
2. Since I'm looking for a "companion" for my son, is it better to go with a puppy or does it matter? I'm thinking a labradoodle has the right personality for this, correct?
3. Is there ever a cheaper time of year to get a puppy from a breeder? (Obviously I want a quality dog, but we don't have as much "extra" money to throw around since we have had so much in medical bills...)

Thanks in advance for any advice. I am learning a lot from everyone!
 

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Hi

I think it's great you are doing some research before getting a dog, especially since you have young children and both of which have allergies

From all I have read there is No guarantee that a Labradoodle will be "allergy free" - F1B should be inclined to be more allergy friendly than and F1

I dont think there is a time of year where dogs are cheaper to purchase. In addition to the purchase price, you have to bear in mind the yearly Vet bills for shots/license and any other problems the do may have, they get illnesses just like humans do and require medical care, you could get a dog that is very healthy for life or one that has medical issues, no way to tell -

I think everyone here agrees that feeding your dog a high quality food is a must - I know a lot of people don't but it does help with their skin an coats to feed them quality food.

I would be concerned about bringing a dog into my home if my children had serious allergies without having them tested for dogs first

If you do decide to go ahead with a dog - you may want to consider a service dog for you son - dogs can be trained to get help when their "person" has a seizure - some dogs can even sense it before it begins. I dont' know a lot about service dogs but I remember someone here trains them (sorry I have forgotten who does this) Anyhow I dont know if there if child has to be a certain age before they can get a service dog or not. Here is a link with phone #'s for each state to get information on service dogs http://www.inch.com/~dogs/service.html

If you do decide to get a "pet" instead of a service dog - I would certainly ask a lot of questions from local Vets as to how a dog might react to your son having a seizure - they could react in a negative manor if they aren't trained to be around someone with seizures which could cause you more problems

Just some food for thought - I'd hate to see you get a puppy or dog and have to find it a home because it didnt adjust to your son's medical condition

Good luck
 

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Welcome to the forum!!

I know that many owners on this site have gotten their pets through rescues. The nice thing about that is that most of the time they are fully grown, including their coat, so you can bring your children to meet the prospective new dog and see their reactions to the dog, as well as the dog's reaction to your children. The flip side, the dog might have problems with your son's reactions--- I think-- correct me if I'm wrong. But I was at a breeder's house this summer, and he talked about training a puppy to know that loud noises are not bad. He was training him for a severly autisic child. But, either way, breeder or rescue, should gain you the dog you are looking for.

The right temperment of a labradoodle will be perfect for your son. Just like any other breed, there are some that aren't made for service and some that were born to help! You just need to make sure you're upfront about what you are looking for with any prospective breeder or rescue volunteer.

I wouldn't know if there is a cheaper time for puppy costs. I know that if puppies have been in the breeders home past a certain point costs SOMETIMES go down, but I'm sure that that's not common or something you should rely on. Most reputable breeders have most of their litters sold by the time they're ready to go home. Like all things it relies on the market, the demand of what they are selling. But sometimes the demand it just low or there are too many litters ready at the same time. When I finally made a decision, I had to make it between 5 or 6 different litters!!!

Good luck! If you live near any Doodle Romps, I suggest you go to one. Its a great way to talk to other doodle owners, find out about breeders, or rescues, as well as seeing them in action. You can find what type you like, coat, color, and most importantly TEMPERMENT. Good luck!
 

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Thanks for your thoughts. My son's seizures are "absence seizures" which means not even the doctor's could tell he was having them without looking at his brain waves. So I don't think he would scare the dog, but that is definitely something I want to ask the doctor in case there is a risk that he will develop the more "scary" seizures. I'm wanting a companion for him, not because he has behavior issues really, but he has problems with playing with other kids because he cannot hold a conversation due to speech delay. For example, He doesn't understand when someone says "what is your name" Kids his age tend to get annoyed when they can't communicate, so he plays alone a lot.

I have definitely seen the difference food can make for my mom's poodles - and realize the daily costs including the frequent grooming. (I am actually the one that takes them both to the vet when they get sick since she is at work all day) So I am prepared for it. I believe we can afford it - but always worry about spending a lot on a big purchase at once since we are sometimes blindsided by a big hospital bill/stay. It seems that most dogs are at about $2500 around me. My husband has found some for under $500, but I'm concerned they may not really be reputable breeders.

I'm also thinking we'll want pet insurance for anything major, but I want to do a little more research on that both on here and elsewhere too.
 

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Cheryl there are threads on here about pet insurance just type in pet insurance in the search area

I'd really check into the service dogs though, they are available for all sorts of medical dianosis - might not be available but I would certainly check it out

Let us know what you find out :)
 

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$500 does seem a bit low. You might want to check that a bit more. They tend to be F1's in that price category, or puppy mills selling F1b's- which obviously you want to stay away from F1's wouldn't elimate the allergy problem- although some F1's on this forum don't shed, they will admit that its not the norm. $2500 are usually multi-gen's. You can find F1b's for less. Where do you live. Jac just had two litters of F1b's, and are more reasonably priced.

I would definitely look into Pet insurance. I'm paying somewhere between 44 and 46 a month, but I get about $400 in annual pet needs back- vet bills, shots, dental cleaning, etc.
 

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Cheryl, we have never had much luck with shelter/rescue animals; often they come with their own sets of problems, both physical and behavioral. I think they can work well if they're joining a family that's very dog savvy and has no other major issues to deal with, but with two young children and the distractions they bring, it's probably not a good bet for you.

Sometimes breeders on the forum are looking for homes for adult females that should no longer be bred; that might work well in your situation. Otherwise I'd recommend a puppy from someone you get to know on the forum or elsewhere. I lurked here for awhile and then started posting way before we got our puppy, and I found that prices away from the east coast were a lot more reasonable, but not down to $500. I also got a very good sense of what kind of breeder the one I chose was, and I'm thrilled with the results. My pup is just what I'd hoped for in terms of temperament, appearance, and also non-shedding coat, and she was raised in a loving, attentive family environment before we got her.

I agree with what's already been said: you'd want an F1B and also one from an established breeder, not just someone who has a poodle and knows a lab and voila! An established breeder can tell which pups in the litter are less likely to shed, although of course no one can guarantee that attribute. My pup also came with health warranties and certificates of eye and hip evaluations from both parents. These things are very important.

Leslie
 

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Welcome to the forum, and I agree with the others I'm glad your doing some research first.

One of the things you can look at is some breeders reputable ones will donate a puppy to you if you pay to have it trained and pay the expense of shipping it to you if it has to ship. I've donated several of my pups one went to a family with a daughter with Downs and her and the pup now about a 1 1/2 old have done great together. She has really bonded with the girl which is what the family wanted. Several of my puppies are now Certified Therapy Dogs also.
 

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welcome Cheryl...nice to meet you!!

i don't think i can add much as everyone here input great info!! the only thing i'd say is f1b versus goldendoodle as we have bad allergies and asthma in my house nietherof which are bothered by us having 2 doodles, one of each.


good luck and once again WELCOME :D
 

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This was posted on the Doodle Zoo and she sounds perfect for your family.
...........................................................................................
I received this earlier today. I received two pictures that if you email me I will forward on. She is a gorgeous cream poodle!

Dorothy is a 2 year, female, Std Poodle who was in training as an assistance dog. She can do the skills but lacks strong work drive. Her strength and greatest desire in life is to cuddle. She has basic obedience, hip and eye clearances, is up to date on vaccinations and has been extremely well socialized. Pedigree info available. She plays well with other dogs and cats. Dorothy has spent time visiting seniors in retirement homes and working in SCC's Kids and K9s program. She loves everyone but especially kids.
Serve us Canines is looking for a person who would like to be a Animal Assisted Therapy Partner for Dorothy. Her cost would be $1,500.
References requested
Please contact:
Sabina Hower
717-872-2771
[email protected]
 
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