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Discussion Starter #1
I own a 7 year old female Labradoodle. I'm not too clear on the definition of a Labradoodle, but her paper's show her mother was a standard poodle and her father was a lab.

My son is looking to purchase a labradoodle, but the breeder shows it as the father is a standard poodle and the mother is a labradoodle, so they are saying it's 75% poodle and 25% lab. Is that truly a labradoodle? Just want to make sure he's getting the correct breed because it's a lot of money. My dog is somewhat curly hair, but all of these puppies seem extremely curly (more poodle hair).

Can someone explain the correct definition of the breed? Do they not breed the lab/poodle anymore? Should it be a labradoodle bred to a labradoodle instead?

thank you!
 

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Your dog is an F1 Labradoodle - a simple cross between the two breeds, poodle and Labrador retriever. F1s often have flatter, coarser coats and are more likely to shed. Your son is looking at F1Bs; these are the offspring of a labradoodle back-crossed to a poodle. You're right, it makes them 75% poodle, which means that their coats tend to be curlier, not as likely to shed, and more likely to be tolerated by people with dog allergies. F1Bs have just enough Labrador to make the coats longer and the personalities sweeter and more people-oriented than is typical of a purebred poodle.

A labradoodle to labradoodle pairing could result in a wide variety of offspring, some of whom could be almost pure lab without the advantages of the poodle infusion.

If the breeder your son is talking to does hip and eye testing of the parents and can offer a one or two-year guarantee against genetic defects, it's well worth the extra money, especially if the breeder is also concerned about temperament and socializes the pups with his or her own family.

Leslie
 

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A labradoodle to labradoodle pairing could result in a wide variety of offspring, some of whom could be almost pure lab without the advantages of the poodle infusion.
Really?? I thought you would have another F1B that looked like an F!B
as opposed to looking like a lab.

Does it make sense to breed an F1B to and F1? If so. Why?
8)
 

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cocoandjane said:
A labradoodle to labradoodle pairing could result in a wide variety of offspring, some of whom could be almost pure lab without the advantages of the poodle infusion.
Really?? I thought you would have another F1B that looked like an F!B
as opposed to looking like a lab.

Does it make sense to breed an F1B to and F1? If so. Why?
8)
Jane, I don't know how familiar you are with basic genetics, and there are people on the forum who have made a thorough study of the way inheritance of traits works with labradoodles, but here's a rough picture in general terms, where L = Labrador Retriever and P = Poodle

L X P = LP (F1)

LP (F1) X P = LP (F1B)

Those are the ones we're familiar with. But if you breed an F1 with another F1 -

LP (F1) X LP (F1) could equal=

LL (all Labrador), LP (Labradoodle, either labby or poodley), or PP (all Poodle)

This is because of the way the traits come together from the parent dogs. The pup could have gotten only the lab genes from each parent, or only the poodle genes, or an odd mix of both, and naturally you could have a wide range of outcomes in any litter. Of course the LL and the PP wouldn't be purebred dogs of their kind because there would still be some of the other breed in there; the transmission wouldn't be 100% either way. But if both parents had equal amounts of the lab and poodle, those genes could come together in the pup to produce an animal that was mostly one or the other.

In human terms, if a pure black person (B) married a pure white person (W) with no mixtures in either background, and then their child (BW)married someone from the same kind of cross, the grandchildren of the first pairs could look all black (BB), all white (WW), or a mixture (BW). On the other hand if their child (BW - the F1 generation) married a pure black (B), the grandchildren (the F1Bs) would be no whiter than their parent F1 and could be as dark as the pure black.

That's a gross oversimplification in both instances, but you get the picture? Or have I been totally confusing?

Anyway, to answer your second question - using those examples, if you bred an F1 to an F1B there would be more poodle in the mix, but among the pups in the litter you could still get an almost totally labby dog with none of the poodle traits we're looking for. I'm not sure how they achieve the Australian multigens; after many generations you would doubtless get stability in what you produce but along the way there'd be a number of almost pure labs in the offspring.

Leslie
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Leslie & Sue, great info - thank you! Without sounding stupid, it sounds like F1B is more common a breed now? And there's nothing wrong with going with that mix right? I guess I'm used to my F1 - and I must have been lucky because she doesn't shed. Because my son's breeder says it's 75% poodle, I was worried he wouldn't get the "sweetness" of the lab, but from what I'm reading, there shouldn't be anything wrong with F1B - they come with health guarantees. We just love everything about my dog and want to make sure he's getting as close to that as he can, but it doesn't seem common to see F1 breeds anymore. Because I got her almost 8 years ago, it almost seems like that was the way they were bred in the beginning (and they were much cheaper back then :D )

Thanks! (finally got a pic of Kailee posted!)
Joyce
 

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To go one step further on this subject, I'm now breeding Labradoodle to Labradoodle depending on the breeder. Some will only breed Lab to Poodle producing F1's, some will breed F1's to Poodle producing F1B's then from there you can just keep going depending on the look you want in your puppies. I find producing the higher generation dogs I get more consistent coats that don't shed at all and don't throw dander.

So really it depends on what you or your son wants in the look of the dog but he is buying a Labradoodle as long as he has done his research on the breeder and feels comfortable with them.
 

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Kailee is beautiful and I too have an F1 that does not shed
Not the norm but a nice surprise as we do not care about shedding
at all with this breed. I am partial to the F1's and will add at a future date another F1 standard size. That is just my preference but I do think they
are all wonderful and the temperment of this breed is very outstanding from what I have seen so far, regardless of generation.........
 

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I have Max a F1 labradoodle who sheds minimally and lately he's almost stopped? time will tell

peanut and beau are f1 goldendoodles
both have fleece coats and both are NON Shedders

even though Peanut is shaggier looking
and Beau is soft as silk but has longer coat

None bother my allergies NOR activate my son's asthma


sounds like your son is looking at f1b labradoodles also known for more Non shedding qualities

Me? I love them all but of course i am somewhat partial to f1's as i
do have 3 of them. :D and i am with Sue on this one...doodles no matter the gneration are all so loving and comical

Kailee is Gorgeous!!!!!!!!!!!
 

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Linda......that is a great post you put up
and the story of Zoey brought tears to my eyes!
 

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Our Dexter is a F1B labradoodle. He is very loving, very silly/goofy and very smart. His coat requires quite a bit of maintenance - we get him groomed once every 8-10 weeks or he will matt. He does not shed, but the coat is definitely more work than Kirby's (F1 Irish Setterdoodle).

I think all doodles are very very similar and as long as your son picks a good breeder and gets a puppy with a good temperment he will be happy.

Oh yeah - my husband has allergies (that's why we got a F1B) - he has been around our friend's F1 labradoodle a lot and never had any allergic reactions.
 

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type of Labradoodle

I am considering a Labradoodle from a breeder which she says is an F3 - the product of 2 F1b parents. She said that these litters are more consistent in terms of coat. Since the parents are brown & brown & white, the litter will be either brown or brown & white, she told me. How are F1b's different from F3's, in terms of coat & looks, and approximately what percentage lab/poodle do they come out to be? I've also been told these types typically cost more, because of the number of generations/time it takes to produce one.
 

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Re: type of Labradoodle

amyg said:
I am considering a Labradoodle from a breeder which she says is an F3 - the product of 2 F1b parents. She said that these litters are more consistent in terms of coat. Since the parents are brown & brown & white, the litter will be either brown or brown & white, she told me. How are F1b's different from F3's, in terms of coat & looks, and approximately what percentage lab/poodle do they come out to be? I've also been told these types typically cost more, because of the number of generations/time it takes to produce one.
AMY here is a discussion going on now about f3's

http://labradoodle-dogs.net/forums/viewtopic.php?t=5974
 
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