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Discussion Starter #1
Hi all, I'm back with another puppy question.

Amanda is about 7 months old now and doing very well. Today she threw up unexpectedly and without warning after she ate supper. My hubby said she was acting a bit weird, always wanting to go out (it was raining). He also noticed her eating some grass.

A few hours later, when I was home, she was gagging a bit and all of a sudden, this HUGE pile of grass was puked up. A bit of water in it, but mostly grass, like the kind you empty from mower bags. Since then she seems okay, drinking a bit more than usual, but pretty playful and seems herself.

Anything to worry about?
 

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That's a dog thing.

Most dogs do it when they are nervous about something. My vet says that some dogs will use it as a way to soothe an upset tummy, and nervous type dogs will do it more often than others. Think of the eating disorders in humans, how they use the vomiting. It's not only to lose weight, but the chemicals released in the brain is some what addicting.

Now I'm not saying that your dog is addicted to grass eating, but don't let her do it if you see her eating grass.

When Cinnamon was a pup, the fresh cut grass was a invitation to graze. We will still have to correct her from time to time, especially if the grass is high. But she hasn't eaten the mowed grass for a while now. (I'll say that and tonight she'll dive right in!)
 
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Nothing to worry about! Boyd ate a chunk of grass off the ride mower last week and almost immediately threw it up. Now he won't go near the stuff but he does chew on blades of grass, tree roots, and anything else he can find in the yard! :roll:
 

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Dogs vomiting is generally not much of a worry...unless, it continues or happens several times in a row, the dog is listless or shows other signs of being ill. Look for blood in the vomit and bowels, you could even take his temp and track it if you worry that he is ill.
I was going to write more info and then decided to look online and found a good source about this: http://www.missionmedvet.com/encycloped ... canine.htm
 

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Discussion Starter #5
A little update on Amanda....and need advice. (Warning: kind of gross)

Last Wednesday was two episodes of vomiting.
Thurs, Fri and Saturday, she had runny poops, like early diarrhea. We withheld food for about 16 hours, she drank water and some pedialyte. I don't think she is dehydrated at all.
Sun, Monday and today: she squats to poop but nothing comes out. Sometimes there'll be a few squirts of something. But not like her normal BMs. Yesterday we gave her a bit of canned pumpkin, which I read was good for diarrhea and constipation. Today she tried two times to poop, and once let out a little yelp. I don't think she is pushing as hard as she needs to; it's almost like it hurts her a bit, so she stops.

I called the vet, but she's in surgery this morning. I'm still waiting for a call back.

Other than the BM situation, she is eating, drinking and playing as much as usual. She seems very happy and in no pain or distress. I can push on her abdomen, and she doesn't seem tender or sore. Her belly seems soft.

Anything else I should do? Does this sound serious?

You guys are the best by the way! Thanks so much.
 

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I'm wondering if she has a partial blockage. I would absolutely bring her to the vet, poor thing!
 

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Discussion Starter #7
what do they do for a partial blockage? would she need an ultrasound? surgery? or just an enema first?
 

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All or any of the above. This is really something that needs to be seen. Poor Amanda!

Is she still vomiting?
 
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Don't panic, the vet will give you good advice. Right now she is doing OK, so stay calm and wait for the vet to call. Here is some info I found on a partial blockage treatment (if that is what is going on)
The most common symptom of a blockage caused by a foreign object is vomiting. Dr. Sheila McCullough, a veterinarian at the University of Illinois Veterinary Teaching Hospital in Urbana, says, "Instead of vomiting once or twice, the animal may vomit ten times in a day. If the animal vomits every time it drinks water, this may indicate an intestinal blockage."

Dr. McCullough warns, "Unfortunately, the problem may not be that straightforward. Sometimes the object causes only a partial blockage, which means that some food and water will continue to move through the system." The object may also move but get stuck periodically, which means that the signs may not be consistent and vomiting may not occur every time the animal eats or drinks.

The object could be in the animal's intestine for a long time before it is discovered. Dr. McCullough says, "In my experience, the longest amount of time that an animal had a foreign object in its digestive system was 3 months!"

The main way to diagnose an obstruction is by taking radiographs (X-rays) of the animal's abdomen. Veterinarians look not only for the object itself but also for abnormal areas of gas in the intestine. Sometimes the object will not show up well on the radiograph, but if abnormal gas patterns are observed the veterinarian may give the animal barium, which is like a "white dye" that is given orally and coats everything in the stomach and intestine. An object coated with barium will appear white in radiographs.

Once a foreign object obstruction has been diagnosed, the foreign object may be removed by surgery or with an endoscope, an instrument with a tiny camera and grasping tool inserted into the body through the mouth without surgery. Sometimes a foreign object can damage the intestine, so a section of the intestine has to be removed. Sharp objects may perforate the intestine, causing further complications, and something like string can cause the intestine to bunch up like an accordion. If this occurs, friction can cause the string to cut into the intestine like a saw, making many small perforations that must be repaired by the surgeon. If the intestine has been perforated, fluid from the intestine may have leaked into the abdomen, which can cause a serious infection called septic peritonitis. Dr. McCullough says, "All of these possibilities make recovery time for an animal that has just had a foreign object removed quite variable."
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thanks, guys.

No, no more vomiting. Just two times a week ago.

The vet's office called back. The vet would like me to stop food for the day and increase her fluid intake. Tomorrow she'd like Amanda to be dropped off in the morning, and she will examine her at some point during the day. She'll take xrays and give iv fluid. Also possibly a stool softener.

I'm not sure whether to do this tomorrow because Amanda has had a BM. While not big considering she hasn't been regular, it was formed and soft. I would think if there was an obstruction, the stool would be misshapen to get around the blockage? Or am I just totally off the mark here?

She loves ice cubes, so we're able to pump her with fluid today. If she has another movement, do you think it's necessary to go the vet route? I don't want her to suffer needlessly, but if she was my child, I wouldn't be overly concerned right now because she is eating, drinking and acting herself....but then again, my kids don't eat trees, bark, etc......
 
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I would call the vet back and tell her about the stool. She will be able to advise you...maybe 'watchful waiting' at this point? The vet may also be thinking of another problem besides an obstruction, so ask her on the phone what she thinks the problem might be.
Like the above article says, if it is an obstruction, the symptoms can come and go as it moves thru the digestive tract....and I guess the small stool could have been in front of some blockage?...but I am a firm believer in not worrying about something until it is diagnosed... and at this point an obstruction does sound unlikely to me (but I am not a vet!)
Keep us posted.
 

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Well, I am so sorry that you have been going through this...and poor Amelia has too!
Linda has given you some excellent advice and references.
I agree that calling the vet for a reassessment can't hurt...but at the same time, I'd want to be sure that everything is okay.
What concerns me is possible dehydration (I had a severely dehydrated puppy who was drinking water all the time) and the fact that just after having loose stools she was straining. Seems to me that she felt she had more to "come out" but it wouldn't come. So, even though she has a fairly normal bowel movement, I'd be concerned about that.
Still, you don't want to pay for a whole day at the vet waiting and for unnecessary testing. So, check with your vet and perhaps get a second opinion from another vet in your area. (It's good to establish a relationshp with two vets anyway in case of an emergency.)
Whatever you decide, please keep us posted.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Thanks again, guys!
Jac, you mistakenly called my pup Amelia....I have a niece Amelia, and whenever I see her, I end up calling Amanda Amelia and vice versa. It's pretty funny sometimes....
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Amanda seems to be doing great. She had another bm last night, and one again this morning. Both without straining and both pretty normal looking.

I'd really like to thank you all for your help. Just being able to talk this through without rushing to the vet was very therapeutic mentally as well as financially!
 
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