Labradoodle Forums banner

1 - 20 of 20 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
189 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi everyone,

I've had Jofi for 5 days now (she's 9 week's old) and today was the first day with no toilet accidents :) and she's sleeping through the night now, 8 hours, no whining and no mess (she has a pee tray if she needs to go in the night).

Anyway, what I'm curious about are the normal ages at which puppies usually accomplish certain milestones...

At what age can I expect for her to have free roam of the house (at the moment she goes in her pen when not being supervised)?

How long does it take for pups to pick up new commands? At the moment she sits on command.

At what age can a pup reliably walk off leash in the park?

I know every dog is different but I'd be interested to know how things went for the rest of you, so I know what to expect. At the moment the main things I'm trying to work on are the nipping/biting, jumping up and grabbing my clothes/hair when she's over excited. I'm guessing this will take a while - her bite can be quite hard at times - I have several scratches on my hands from her teeth/claws - usually when she jumps up and tries to grab hold of my hand in her mouth. I'm assuming this is all pretty normal doggie behaviour.

One final question - how much sleep should a pup of 9 weeks be getting a day? I'm a bit worried I'm playing with her too much - it's hard not to as she's so cute - are there any signs to look out for that she's over-tired (perhaps this is when she gets more nippy?).

Hope these aren't daft questions - I'm new to all of this and just want to do things right (am a bit paranoid about doing the wrong thing).

Thanks :)

Libby & Jofi
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15,203 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,243 Posts
Hi Libby, welcome!
Jofi is adorable!
Boy, you are asking loaded questions and so I am going to direct you to a link that will show you that you really can't expect a pup to be trained until at least 4 months of age. It really is more commonly the persons trained to get the pup to do things...however, if you continue to work with Jofi, she will learn certain words.
As this article states, she will change as she matures because nature makes dogs more aware, more protective, more reactive for certain things...and you will be caught by surprise many times. So, enjoy this sweet age, it will be replaced with the zoomies, the chewing, the underwear stealing and the potty accidents...to name a few!
http://www.veterinarypartner.com/Conten ... C=0&A=1737
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
189 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Hi Jac,

I'm so sorry - I assume by 'loaded' you mean that my questions are inappropriate or sensitive - the last thing I want to do is upset anyone here.

I think you maybe misunderstood the tone of my message - the reason I'm asking is because I want to know what I should be expecting - I don't want to rush things. I want to get things right - not too soon but not to miss the boat and ignore behaviour that will be difficult later on (like biting) - Jofi is my first dog so I have everything to learn. I love her to bits and want the best for her.

To be honest, 'leaving training until 4 months' doesn't totally make sense to me - I regard all kinds of behaviour modification as 'training' - e.g. encouraging her when she's chewing on her toy and not on me, praising her when she pees outside, asking her to sit before I give her a treat/her food bowl, and subtle ways of helping her establish her place in the 'pack'. I think these are good things to be doing now - of course formal obedience classes can wait until some months later.

The reason I asked about the milestones is because I am curious at what ages a developing dog can be introduced to these things (it wasn't a sign of impatience or over-expectation) - I'm not thinking for one minute that a young pup will be ready for these things. I don't even know whether some should wait until adulthood for example - that's why I asked.

If I end up asking questions that perhaps shouldn't be asked, I am sorry - I'm new to all this so have lots of questions. This forum seems a friendly place to learn from those with experience - and probably for those of you who have had dogs for years, these questions have obvious answers.

I've read several puppy books to try and prepare for Jofi - what I do notice is that there is a lot of conflicting information out there - even between our vet and the breeder and a lot of this information is presented as being 'absolutely necessary' (if you don't do this you'll ruin your dog), which makes it all a bit scary as to which of the conflicting information to adhere to.

Thanks for the links.

Libby
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,243 Posts
Oh, gosh, no, Libby!
By saying that the question was loaded, I only meant that it was a lot of info and very hard to answer. The reason is that every dog, like every child, will go through phases at different times in their development.
As an example, even something as routine as a heat cycle can come at either 4 months of age or 2 years!
So, please forgive me if I sounded impatient or otherwise insulting about your question. I absolutely understood your questions and respect the fact that you care enough to be prepared.
I simply wanted to point out that if you expect certain things at a very young age, you can be disappointed when the pup changes phases, as often happens.
I certainly never meant to imply that you should not train her, and begin early. I think that is a wonderful commitment you are making to her well being.
I hope that you will not take my previous response as any type of sensorship or even frustration.
Please, that is what we are here for.
I think that if you do some searching in the archives, as Ann Marie mentioned, you will find many practical answers to your questions.
I hedged by giving you the article because each question you asked could take several pages to explain...and I thought that the article did a good job of expressing that things change througout life and that many times health is a factor that is often overlooked when something does, indeed, change.
I hope that you will continue to ask questions, to research and to keep us updated about your adorable puppy!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15,203 Posts
HI Libbi....waht we were trying to do is help guide you to many articles/posts and some books on this subject which has been discussed numerous times in the past year.

Sometimes just using common sense and going with the puppy's personality is best for the 1st 4 to 5mos.

basic things like sit, lie down, settle, come are all great.

Repect training is good too where you teach a dog that You're the pack leader.

I have found all 3 doodles to have different personaliities and levels of maturity. Max was easily trained early on whereas Peanut took much more time . Beau is catching on fairly quickly

as for me Formal Obedience training doesn't start till 7mos of age usually OR like i said depends on your dog

However, all 3 at young ages learn the word WAIT, NO, SETTLE, and NOT to pull on leashes, go potty on command, no mouthing, have to do a 5 to 10min sit by my side ignoring everyone and everything in my home and no mouthing and then they get petted the whole time being praised.

This is started at age 4mos as till then i let them be little puppies
I did the same with all 3 kids let them be babies then start in on the rules once toddler stage.

Now i have one dog doesn't jump and my other one @12mos started again, and the 5mos halfway there to stopping.
2 weren't nippy at all just mouthy, the 3rd one tried to be nippy and we stopped that in one week.

So keep reading, then try to see if it works for you and then if not we're happy to offer advice that May or MAY not help.

i also make all 3 dogs from day one learn to SIT and wait for the word OK before eating ....i don't get knocked down and it's a form of respect training. which spills over to walks on a leash and more
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,120 Posts
Libby,
Jofi is adorable!!!
Jac is right - all puppies are different and seem to grow up on their own schedules - My Tyke has been very different from the other puppies I've had. At 3 months, my two Eskies had the run of the house, and we didn't have to worry about them touching anything. Tyke, on the other hand, is now 5 months old, and still into EVERYTHING! We don't leave her in any room unsupervised, except for the kitchen, which we have puppy-proofed!
Also, my first Eskie was pretty trustworthy off the leash all her life, while we NEVER let the second one off the leash(she had a strong dislike for other dogs and cats!). Tyke is in a bit of a hardheaded stage right now - she does not always come when I call her, but I have learned that if I simply start walking off in another direction, she will follow me. Depending upon where you live, I would be leary of letting any dog roam free off of a leash. I worry more about traffic and other hazards to the dog than I do about the dog listening to me!
That is great that Jofi is already sleeping through the night! I think Tyke was about 12 weeks old before she did that - she would wake me up a couple of times a night to go outside. Is Jofi crate-trained?
As for the nipping, I know how you feel - I wrote this forum and asked the same question a few months ago! I had scratches and little bite marks all over my arms! Her baby teeth were like NEEDLES! Now that she has gotten more of her permanent teeth, she seems to also be more careful about how hard she bites, but she will still leave a bruise once in a while!

Good luck to both of you and welcome to the forum!!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
189 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Jac, I'm sorry - I see I totally got the wrong end of the stick there. Thanks for the reassurance and advice.

Annmarie, you sound like an impressive dog trainer with lots and lots of patience - 3 doodles!! How did you deal so quickly with the nipping problem with your 1 doodle? Do you think his/her having playmates helped relieve this problem? Jofi is a real biter unfortunately - she gets to excited and then bites and bites. i've been doing the yelping and then ignoring her but don't see much of a change so far. Tonight she bit my partner (he was just playing with her) and drew blood. I have little puncture wounds all over my hands now and scratches - and holes bitten out of my jumper. Yesterday she got hold of my hand (jumped up and attached) and I yelped but she didn't let go - I had to prize her mouth open with my free hand to get it out. This is something I really want to change quickly. When she's sleepy and relaxed she's lovely and mellow but when she's in play mode it's difficult to last more than 15 seconds without a bite. It's been like this since day 1.

Kim, thanks for sharing your experiences - they come as a comfort and I can relate to the biting. I hope Tyke softens her bite too. When I can't supervise Jofi I confine her to her pen, which has a crate inside. At night she is in her pen, which has a pee tray (the Ugodog) which she has got the hand of really quickly. I think having a house mostly void of carpet has helped.

Libby
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,120 Posts
I've never seen the pee tray you mentioned, but I love the name!! :lol:
As for the biting, Jofi sounds exactly like Tyke!!! We finally found that a product called Liquid Bandage works well for the little puncture wounds and scratches - and keeps you from being covered with Band-Aids!! I've tried the yelping and ignoring, and like you - it didn't work too well - it just got her more excited. We now give her a brief "time out" in the kitchen away from the family, and that seems to work a bit better.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,336 Posts
Libby
Denver was a horrible biter as a puppy and I still have
scars. I tried all the tricks and then some, turning our backs to
him and stopping any kind of play was what eventually worked but it
took a lot of time. As far as potty training, he was a star and was trained
very fast, within the first couple of weeks and has never back tracked.
Leash walking we had to use and still do on occasion the gentle leader.
As far as off leash he is very good and has been since about 6 months old with the occasional retraining to come when called..............

So it really is very different for all dogs and consistency and hard work is what it takes, but this is a very smart breed and it will all work out for you.
good luck and keep asking questions...... :wink: :wink:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15,203 Posts
Libby, i don't know if this helps since you tried the yelping already

i hold my hand fully outstretched and say NO sharply
also with an outstretched hand there is nothing to bite :wink:

the other thing is to make your doodle sit facing away from you while you are in a chair. keeping stroking their head, mouth, back etc
saying GOOD JOFI , Good settle. if he tries to nip or mouth you move hand down his back.

try this for 5 to 10 min at least once a day and he also has to ignore other in the house

and yes having other doodles around does minimize nipping as they play and nip each other instead of me

i am NOT a great trainer just been around dogs my whole life
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,243 Posts
I am glad you understand, Libby...I felt horrible if you were hurt.
You might want to put some bitter apple or (better yet) bitter yuck on your hands when you think about it. It is really nasty stuff.
With our pups, we very gently hold their nose and say "no bite!" and let go, before long, they understand because they don't like to be held.
Does anyone play tug of war with her? If so, this creates a power struggle and it is not advisable to play like that with puppies...I dont' know if that happens at your house, but I do recall reading about it and it makes sense to me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
123 Posts
Hi,

Here is a summary of my experience to date (Emily is now four months and I got her with 9 weeks)

* Housebreaking requires your being extremely consistent. Schedule is absolutely essential. Emily has done very well with few accidents but she will still have them if I do not pay attention. My dream is the day she will let me know when she needs out :) :) :)
* She does need lots of sleep. Like you I kept ker awake and playing for long hours (sooooooooooo cute0 but it ended up affecting her meals and schedule. They are babies and need rest
* Emily learn fast (at least when they want to ) and I started at early age. Emily sits, fetches, waits when asked to, and walks next to me
* Emily loves going for a wask and playing with other dogs ( especially doodles). Just make sure you are current on vaccines


and above all they are an absolutely pleasure to be around. Nothing beats it!!!


maria and emily
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,243 Posts
Hi Maria,
I don't know that I have properly welcomed you...so if not, please consider this a hearty welcome!
You are so right...these things are frustrating, but when you look back on the time it is so precious.
Oh...by the way, my dogs NEVER tell me when they need to go out. They come and sit and look at me...like they do for everything, from a pat on the head to a snack...the same sit, the same look.
We installed doggie doors...it has been a lifesaver! (Not for everyone, I know.)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
189 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
Kim, I got the Ugodog (yes cool name) from http://www.ugodog.net/uk-index.html. The benefit is that a grate covers the tray so the dog doesn't trail urine around the house on his paws. In the day time she mostly does her business outside but at night or while confined to her pen she reliably uses this - I first placed newspaper over it to encourage her there and sprayed the tray with scent.

As for getting the dog to tell you when she/he wants to go out - I've heard of a product called 'poochie bells' - dog proof bells on a strap that can hang from the door. The idea is you train the dog to ring the bells when she/he needs to go out and 'go'. I haven't tried anything with this yet - she just thinks it's a toy in the kitchen.

As you might have noticed, I'm kind of into gadgets :)

Annmarie, I'll try the things you suggested. I haven't tried the 'settle down' exercise yet, although I've had her in the kitchen while I was working and she has just settled down by my feet.

Jac, before I realised I did play tugging games - but read that this wasn't a good idea so avoid these games now. She does initiate these games though i.e. grabbing my trouser leg as I try to exit the pen, nicking my glove as we are walking outside and not giving it back - I don't half look silly having a dog attached to my glove! In this case I hold my hand up, say 'drop' and ignore her until she releases. If there's another toy to hand I'll distract her with it.

Libby
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
985 Posts
All of the ideas for discouraging nipping are excellent, and she will probably outgrow it anyway. It helps if everyone your pup comes in contact with reacts similarly; I am having trouble getting my granddaughter to help us with this because her natural response is to get excited herself when Chouette is jumping up and/or being mouthy. Chou's not bad, but once in awhile we still do get those yawning jaws when she's feeling playful.

We have a lovely set of Poochiebells hanging by our door; very decorative but she never did learn to use them. None of my dogs have ever told me when they needed to go out, and the trainer said his were the same. He also warned that one problem with systems like the bells is that if your dog likes to go out to play you'll get a lot of signals when the dog doesn't need to relieve itself but just wants a trip outdoors for recreational purposes!

Chouette will often be very restless, or come sit and look at me as Jac's dogs do, when she wants to go out. But once in awhile that just means that she thinks the cat (who lives outside) needs chasing. :roll:

Leslie
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,120 Posts
Libby and Leslie:
Tried to use the poochie bells with Tyke, but ended up taking them away after a few days - I think she liked the sound of them, and rang them CONSTANTLY! (Behind that sweet face lurks an evil genius! :twisted: )

I have the same problem with Tyke sometimes when we walk - she loves to grab the hem of my pants. I usually just stop and make her sit until she calms down. She still has a little episode or two of this during each walk, but is starting to realize it's not getting her anywhere!!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
123 Posts
We had same experience with poochie bells. Emily loves the sound they make and rang them all day long -- so they are back in the box :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
189 Posts
Discussion Starter #19
hahaha glad to hear the poochie bells have been a success :eek: - 95% success rate I read on one website - hmmm - doodles are too smart for them I think or too musical. Jofi likes to play the bells - although if she played them all day I'd have to hide them away. I got her one of those balls that makes animal noises and she wouldn't stop barking and growling at it, so that's been put out of sight for the moment. As for the snugglepuppie (which is meant to sooth her while she sleeps in her crate), that was banished this morning to the Ugodog. Everytime we put it with her in her crate (it has a warmer inside and a heartbeat so should be soothing), she picks it up and throws it out again!!! Poor snugglepuppie :?
 
G

·
Maya will let me know when she needs to go out. She will get up and go stand by the door. If I am not quick enough she will start to whine. Never did use bells.
 
1 - 20 of 20 Posts
Top