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Placement of crates

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Napa's gotten more and more violent since we came to RI while being crated. I plan on doing some crate training (question 2) but let me ask a question first.

Napa's upstairs in my bedroom (main floor) while we're out, and Striker is in the basement. We feel like we're in a catch 22 here. Napa, we think, would be more comfortable with Striker being near him, but we feel that Striker would be even more anxious with Napa down there.

Napa is totally the dominant dog, and Striker is letting Napa walk all over him. Striker has no concept of dog interaction so most interactions between Striker and Napa are tense for Striker. He tries to bury himself in one of the closest humans when Napa tries to play with him.

So, we're looking for more input from other dog people about whether we should move Napa's crate to the basement.

Secondly, in everyone's preparation for puppies, has anyone read a book that details HOW to crate train. I read one of Caesar Millian's books, but all he says on the matter is to make sure they've been exercised. Well, if we remember our little houdini, he escape on a day when he was DEAD tired.... so that's not going to work. I need to make him like the crate. He's already started to destroy this crate, and we've gone out bought clips to keep him locked in.... and I can't trust him out because he's destroyed little things when he has gotten out..... So, please, any help finding a method to train him to at least tolerate the crate will be soooo helpful!

Thanks in advance
 
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Sadie likes to see Maya so I keep her crate where she can see Maya most often. The daycare keeps Sadie's crate near Maya too otherwise she whines.
 

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I would try crating them next to each other, but then wait upstairs and listen to see if you hear crying from Striker or anything.

It's tough to make them like the crate if they don't like it to start with. Kirby was so miserable going to his crate every day and we found out having him in a dog proof room worked so much better - could you try that with Napa?
 

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We started Fonzie in the crate from the day we brought him home at 8 wks. His crate was right next to our 13 year old beagle. Although they didn't really play with each other, they certainly knew the other was there and could see and smell each other. Opie (our beagle) turned out to be just too old and worn out for a puppy.

We used a "heartbeat" simulator thing that I took from one of my son's baby teddy bears that runs for about 10 minutes. Fonzie found this soothing and would even put himself in the crate every afternoon for a nap. We now only use the crate when he is home alone or if I need to contain him for some other reason. The crate isn't his favorite place, but he doesn't mind it either. There a great toys that are only played with in the crate, it is now by the slider so he can watch the birdfeeder and he always gets a special snack after he is in it.

Nancy
 

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I have learned alot from Pk (Satz method) especially when talking about rescue dogs. She recommends they sleep in the same room as the adults in the family. She had lots to backup and the reasoning behind it and it makes so much more sense. When a dog is left to roam or crated by themselves they feel the need to be on guard all night and therefore sometimes will not get a restful night sleep causing them to be edgy etc etc. I can copy some of her article if you wish.

michele
 

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this is from a post about lincoln being able to not be in his crate at night ( though still is during the day when we are not at home)



>We have allowed him to roam at night






Gently put, this is not a good idea. Dogs need to sleep with the
pack. A dog who sleeps with the pack in the den (your bedroom) fees
safe and protected. It is really not about him not wanting to sleep
in your room. And more that if he is allowed to leave your room he
will feel obligated to explore night noises and then feel compelled to
guard/protect your territory while you sleep. Just as your small
children feel they must protect you at certain times it is too
overwhelming a responsibility for a young, uncertain dog. This opens
up a whole can of worms and erodes the bond you two should be
strengthening right now. It can also lead to big problems later with
your children and their friends. But that is another post.

If however he is gated or closed into your bedroom at night he does
not feel these responsibilities. He feels that if anything is amiss
you will let him know and guide him in what to do. He is able to rest
deeply and fully, which is never possible when he is on self appointed
guard duty somewhere else in the house.

The separation issue is yet another post. I'm sure if you search the
archives you will find much good information there. If not let me
know and that will be my next post to you okay?

PK


PK Shader CSATSLL1,ABMA, ABS, AWA, CSATS Mentor
For Love of Dogs Canine/Human Relations Learning Center LLC
Offices in Waterford & Springfield, WI 53176
Office 262-248-0620 Cell 312-259-5305
Currently and for the last 42 years teaching humans to live in harmony
with their best friends.
 

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Yeah, I agree...definitely try to have them next to each other and see how it works. In my doggie experience dogs definitely seem to feel more comfortable when they have company.
 

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Everything I have seen about crate training is just how to gradually get them to like the crate. Make sure to feed them meals inside their crate, at first put them in for only a few minutes at time, practice having them just go inside and back out. We oddly enough watched a few crate training videos through our cable's on demand feature. I think they were free clips off of animal planet. Good luck.
 
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