Labradoodle Forums banner

1 - 20 of 29 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,336 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I have checked this out with my vet so I know it is ok to give Denver
cottage cheese and yogurt in moderation. Denver loves yogurt so I give him about 4 tablespoons every other day, is that amount deemed to be in moderation?
I have found info on the internet that says daily yogurt is ok but they do not specify how much. Just thought that maybe someone else feeds some people food.

In the olden days, we fed our dogs everything and anything as in those days we either could not afford "dog food" or just followed what everyone else was doing. Most of our dogs lived into their late teens. Today we know more about nutrition for dogs, people etc.
I have to admit that I am guilty of letting Denver have a couple of pieces of popcorn once in a while as well, and although my vet prefers no people food period, she says (as long as they do not choke on the kernels) that it is a preferred people food compared to what some people feed their dogs.
In a nutshell what do you guys think of feeding any people food? Breeders?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,619 Posts
No human food here. Jonah did get a little cottage cheese and yogurt when he had his "poopy" problems, but PU!!! Gassy!! :shock: With his sensitive tummy, dog food and the occasional biscuit.

My old cocker spaniel Peche was a popcorn addict!! All I would have to do was say popcorn, and he would sit in front of the microwave and cry til it was done. It was the cutest thing! :lol:
 
G

·
Somewhere I read a story about a Veterinary school. The residents said that they could always tell the dogs that were fed cheap dog food and NO people food. They said their coats were terrible and their health was poor. They called them "corn dogs" because the cheap dog food was corn based which has no nutritional value for a dog. The article went on to say that some dogs who were fed the same cheap dog food were much healthier with a glossy coat. These dogs were always fed table scraps in addition to their poor dog food. So I don't think feeding people food in moderation is terrible. My vet agrees with me. But he definitely does not want an overfed, overweight dog. My vet also thinks dogs being on the furniture is OK. I really like my vet :lol: The first vet I went to said absolutely NO people food and he kept his dog (big German Shepherd) in the kitchen ALL the time. He also said Bella 'had a lot to learn'...and she was only 12 weeks old :roll: I never went back :lol:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,617 Posts
Raleigh & Molly get a piece of cheese in the morning, and once a week I cook them eggs.....great for their coats! Oh yeah....and popcorn once in a while....and peanut butter.....guess I'm guilty of giving them 'people food'...they also love veggies and grapes!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,617 Posts
Really????? Grapes? That would be great if you can find out why.....I had no idea! :oops:
 
G

·
Grape and Raisin Poisoning:
http://www.snopes.com/critters/crusader/raisins.asp
and
http://www.dogbreedinfo.com/grapeandraisin.htm

Raisin and Grape Toxicity in Dogs

By Lauren Shifflett
[email protected]
Hyattsville, MD

Although many dog owners and dog trainers have traditionally used raisins and grapes as treats, RAISINS AND GRAPES IN LARGE QUANTITIES CAN BE LETHAL TO DOGS. As few as a handful of raisins or grapes can make a dog ill; however, of the 10 cases reported to the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center (APCC), each dog ingested between 9 ounces and 2 pounds of grapes or raisins.

If your dog has ingested large quantities of raisins or grapes, (s)he will immediately begin to vomit repeatedly, and will become extremely hyperactive and jittery. After about 24 hours, the dog will become lethargic and depressed. (S)he may experience abdominal pain and may stop urinating, drinking, and/or eating. (S)he will also become dehydrated. Both his/her vomit and feces will contain partially digested raisins or grapes. His/her breathing may become irregular, and (s)he will also become hypercalcemic (high calcium concentrations) and hyperphosphosphatemic

Ultimately, without treatment, the dog will go into renal (kidney) failure, and may die a horrible very painful death. Of the 10 reported cases, only 5 dogs survived, & these only with early, aggressive, & long-term treatment

The best cure for an overdose, of course, is prevention. Because dogs can get hold of raisins or grapes from a variety of sources-the kitchen counter, the coffee table, vines in a private vineyard, a child's lunch box-DOG PROOF YOUR VINEYARDS & REMOVE RAISINS AND GRAPES FROM CANINE REACH. Do not feed your dog raisins/grapes as treats so that you can avoid him/her "getting a taste for them". Remember that raisins are even more concentrated (and hence more toxic) than grapes-approximately 4 pounds of grapes equal 1 pound of raisins. The APCC also warns that any substance in large doses can be toxic.

However, if you suspect your dog has eaten a large amount of raisins or grapes, take your dog to a veterinarian immediately, and have them contact the Animal Poison Control Center for assistance. Have your veterinarian initiate decontamination measures, and administer fluids and/or dialysis to assist/restart the dog's kidneys. Be aware that initially your veterinarian may suspect rat poison as the above symptoms are very similar to the symptoms of rat poison.

The APCC is still unable to determine the cause of renal (kidney) failure. Possibilities include 1) an agent in grapes and raisins themselves; 2) fungicides, herbicides, or pesticides contamination; 3) heavy metals; 4) high amounts of Vitamin D; or 5) fungus or mold contamination.

Information on raisin and grape toxicity is still very new; therefore, your veterinarian and fellow dog owners may not yet be aware of the danger. Please pass on this information to every dog owner, veterinarian, rescue group, breeder, newsletter, listserve, and pet food store you can.

For more information about grapes and raisin toxicity and/or all substances toxic to dogs and other animals, please see the ASCPA Animal Poison Control Center Website at: http://www.napcc.aspca.org

If you suspect your dog has ingested any poisonous substance, please CALL the APCC at 888-4ANI-HELP (888-426-4435) immediately.

Also please read "Renal failure associated with ingestion of grapes or raisins in dogs." The Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association (JAVMA). May 15, 2001. Volume 218. Number 10. Pages 1555-1556.
 
G

·
I did not know either, I think I read about it here a couple months ago...Bella really liked grapes too, I would freeze them...not anymore :cry:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,617 Posts
Wow! Thank you sooooo very much Linda! I only gave them one a piece...but they'll NEVER touch another one again, believe me!
 
G

·
No problem! I like the advice to dog proof your vineyard...I'll have to go do that right now :lol: After I dock the yacht :lol:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,617 Posts
In New Jersey???? :shock: ha-ha...I should think your yacht would be frozen solid in the water, if it's as cold there as it is in Connecticut!!! :?
Seriously tho, I appreciate your advice! HAve a good night, and I'm glad Bella is back to normal! :D
Kathie
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
298 Posts
When Lexi was 9 weeks old, and we took her to the vet for the first time, I asked how many puppy treats per day she could have. He said NONE! He said the lab mix puppies tend to have weight problem as adults.

I asked how I might train her - he suggested sliced carrots - or - small pieces of broccoli. Although I do use the carrots, I also mix in some treats.

Then I asked when she would be old enough to eat table scraps. He said, NEVER!

So far I haven't given any. Lexi is 6 months old now. But I wish I could, and will do some research after her first year to reconsider.

Maddie and Lexi
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,617 Posts
Great tips here! Thanks!
Marty, I give my dogs eggs, but scramble them first....it IS good for their coats....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,499 Posts
I don't see wall board on the list...hubby said that Cinnamon ate a chunk when he wasn't looking yesterday. (I was gone) Doesn't seem to bother her though. I'm thinking it pretty much disolves in water anyway, it will probably pass with no problem. I'm watching her though!

We're doing some remodeling and even though he's not a slob, he's not real good at watching 2 things at once - walls and a sneaky doodle!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
138 Posts
I don't give any people food to Bailey, but I have switched her over to Innova EVO because it's high protein and is totally grain free, so it's more like the diet that dogs were meant to eat. Kind of like it's the kibble version of a RAW diet. It sounds good enough to eat... :D

Turkey, Chicken, Turkey Meal, Chicken Meal, Potatoes, Herring Meal, Chicken Fat, Natural Flavors, Egg, Garlic, Apples, Carrots, Tomatoes, Cottage Cheese, Alfalfa Sprouts, Dried Chicory Root, Taurine, Lecithin, Rosemary Extract, Vitamins/Minerals, Viable Naturally Occurring Microorganisms.

And it's low temp cooked so it holds more of the nutrients.

I just have to be careful to make sure she doesn't eat too much because a high protein diet can make puppies grow too fast (fortunately she's a mini, so it's not as big of an issue). You feed them less of it than other foods because their bodies use so much more of the food.

She LOVES it, and she's doing much smaller poops since it's usually the grains that don't digest and are excreted.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,617 Posts
Maddie,
If you read the list that seazr posted, it contains broccoli..evidentally the vet dosen't know about this. My vet said there's no reason not to give treats, as long as they're small...I used to give Molly large milkbones when she came in from doing her business, but she gained too much weight. I now buy 'Charlie Bears' which are about the size of a penny. And both dogs get one of those when they come in. Our vet said that they don't care whether the treat is large or small, as long as they get something! Sometimnes I think some of the vets and breeders go a little overboard with their 'do's and 'don'ts'....but I think our common sense usually wins out. :D
Kathie
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15,203 Posts
Max now gets chicken, rice, beef, pork , pumpkin, sweet potatoe and baked potato and some scrambled eggs.
yougurt , and cottage cheese in tiny amounts.

Fish is next on the list
To-date Max can't digest dog food by the 4th day :roll:
Yes he has a vet appt again :D :D :D



In the past I do know when an egg was dropped on the floor our dogs and cats licked it up quickly. I once had a cat whose favorite food was stuffed cabbage rolls and spaghetti! hahahhaaa
 
1 - 20 of 29 Posts
Top