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I'm considering getting a labradoodle. However, I live by myself and work 8-10 hours a day. I can come home and let her out, but would she get lonely?

What is their temperment like? I really think they are special, and would love to have the company, but is it fair to the dog to leave her alone so much? What are your dogs like when you leave them alone?
 

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Faith, it's especially hard with a puppy, working those hours. We always tried to get our puppies during periods when we were home more, like summer vacation since we both worked in schools before we retired. But on the forum you have people who work all sorts of hours and shifts, so their advice would be helpful.

Everyone says that labradoodles are very people-y dogs and don't do well left alone for long periods. I don't know whether getting an adult would make a difference over the long haul. One of the reasons we used to have Great Danes is that they're not very active, nor are they as gregarious and affectionate as doodles are, and they didn't mind spending the day alone in our house. We also worked a variety of schedules, and my husband left early and got home early, while I left later and got home a bit later, thus shortening the time our critters were left to their own devices. When we had Irish setters, our first dogs after we were married, the female hated being left and would destroy whatever she could until we got past that phase. I think a lot depends on the individual animal. Sorry that's not much help!

Leslie
 

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Hi Faith,

Your situation sounds like ours. We both have the "typical" 40 hr a week work job (and both work the same hours). We got Dex at 8 weeks. We came home at lunch to let him out every day until he was about 6 mos old. After that he was fully potty trained and developed good bladder strength.

Concerning the time alone...I mean I don't think Dex likes it, but he's used to it. He has been since the day he got here. We have worked at home on occasion and honesly he does nothing but sleep all day. I think he has just adapted himself to our schedule.

Is it fair to them? I don't know...he seems perfectly happy and well adjusted (besides his doodle antics) so he seeems like he likes his life :) When we get home we make a point to spend lots of time with him.

An adult dog would be easier because of the potty training. However if he/she grew up and wasn't left alone they would have to adjust to that. We recently adopted a 1 yr old dog Kirby and he is crated all day and doesn't seem to have any problems with it.

Dogs are resiliant and adjust.
 

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Hi Faith, welcome to the forum :) You work long hours and it would be a lonely existance for a puppy but maybe you could find an older puppy or young adult needing a loving home. Do you work 5 days a week or 6 or 7? That would make a difference also. If you work 5 days a week and you could take your new dog to a doggy day care a couple days a week and then make sure you go for long walks or get other exercise on the other 3 days, or maybe you could hire someone to come walk your dog during the day while you are at work. There are ways to make it work but I would not consider getting a puppy/dog if you are not able to provide some kind of care during the day for an hour or so while you work. Good luck :!: Labradoodles are the best :wink:
 

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I was taking an all day class when we first got Cali and I hired a pet sitter to come twice a day to let her out and play with her and walk her. That's another option.
 

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Welcome and THANK YOU for being so conscientous as to ask this question!

I like Leslie's answer about how 'people-y' Doodles are. The Retriever factor gives us puppies that are all about people-pleasing, if we love and bond with our puppies. I think that bonding with your puppy would have to be your primary goal in your out-of-work hours.

I placed a puppy with a family who said they would come home at lunch to bond with, and give relief to their puppy, but later reports proved they didn't follow through. According to their trainer, they really never bonded with their dog. I hope he's happy but it saddens me when I think of him having people who wouldn't give of themselves for the sake of the 3 of them (2 adults and pup) growing together.

I have a sort-of rule that I want people who work away from home to tell me what their plan is for bonding, despite their work. I have seen it work out just fine, also. So I don't think it's all black/white. But Leslie (& Jerry) gives an excellent example of giving extra time and sacrifice to make sure their Dexter knew he could count on them to come home, and give him his love and security. If you work 10hrs, since you are alone, if you could even go home TWICE in a 10hr period I think that would be good.

The bottom line is that there is real care, consideration, and inconveniece that we need to go through, for the sake of our puppy's care and training. Looking at how you will tackle those challenges will give you a very big return of happiness and mutual love from your new Doodle.
 

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When we got Tanner he was 4 1/2 months old. Tim and I both work regular 40+ hour jobs 5 days a week...weekends off.

We got him just before Christmas so we were home a lot the first 3 weeks. After that, I came home everyday at lunch time and played and walked him (1 hour). We soon discovered daycare and he started of going 1 day a week.

Now that Tanner is a year old, he goes to daycare mon, wed, friday...he stays at home for 9 hours alone with our cat on tues and thurs. The days he is home, after I take him on a 2 mile walk in the AM, he rests up from his previous days activity so he is raring to go when we get home. We usually prefer to stay home in the evenings so he gets plenty of attention.

Weekends we take him to a school yard for chuckit ball play...take long walks, take him places with us in the car...he is usually with us.

That is how we arranged our lives to accomodate a doodle....and we couldn't be happier.



:) :wink: :)
 

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Hello Faith, welcome!
I agree with the others, about you being caring enough to ask the questions and about the advice that dogs get used to their family routines.
Personally, I feel that it is too long for a young puppy to be left alone, BUT I agree with Linda and the others who have mentioned that you could hire someone to come in and let him out to potty and play a few times a day.
If you do get a puppy, potty training will be nearly impossible if he is alone for over 8 hours a day (you have to consider the commute time.)
You could take the pup to doggie day care or to another person's home for sitting and socialization, just as you would a child.
I guess that is my best advice, treat your puppy as you would a child...atleast for the first two months.
Much of it also depends on the amount of quality time you spend with your pup when you get home. If you are just going to read or watch television and go to bed, I'd suggest that you reconsider getting a puppy. An adult dog should be okay with this, but still needs some physical and mental stimulation.
I really love doggie day care concepts...it works for both dog and family.
Here is a good site about crate training and it tells you how long to expect your pup to remain crated, along with potty training information:
http://www.inch.com/~dogs/cratetraining.html
Talk to the breeder too...they can help you find a less active puppy...that might help, but even less active pups need that exercise and mental stimulation.
 

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There's been alot of great advice...not much to add here.

I guess i'd think of this: are you willing to possibly lose sleep the 1st
2 weeks if you're puppy can't sleep the whole night and/or needs to go potty at 1, 3 or 5am ( peanut did)

are you willing to deal with possible accidents in your house having Nature's Miracle become a good friend for a short while

does possible chewing and/or holes in a rug, socks, maybe even linoleum bother you as in get you mad or are you able to laugh this off while being consistent with training?

are you able to continuously , daily have energy to get up EARLIER every day to give your puppy time to eat, bond, and play/exercise BEFORE going to work and the moment you get home

these are just a few questions that need consideration before getting a puppy that will WIN your heart over in about 5 minutes and you will bond so close that he/she becomes like a new friend/family member to you. :D

good luck !! :D :D :D :D :D
 

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My husband and I both work 40 hours a week, weekends off, and faced the same dilemma. I took a week off work when we got Boyd to bond with him and get him crate trained and used to being alone.

I also hired someone to take Boyd for a walk at lunch and our 12 year old neighbor lets him out when she gets home from school.

Boyd has adjusted just fine. I also make it a point to walk him before and after work and he goes to doggy daycare on Mondays. We don't go out at night either - we spend our time playing with Boyd! :lol:
 

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I read a general rule that a puppy can be alone in a crate for as many hours as it is months old. If you get a 8-10 weeks old puppy, i would not suggest pushing much past 2-3 hours without a pee and play break. And they really do get up in the middle of the night to pee at that age...2am, 4am, 6am. OMG i dont miss that. if you can find a 6-8 months old puppy, it should be able to deal with the whole day alone, if it gets tonnes loving in the am and again at night. We do 30-45 minutes of intense fetch every am and Hershey sleeps all day weather we are home or not.
 

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One other thing to consider with doodles is their very high energy level. You will see a lot of people on this forum talk about the doodle 500s--I think everyone's doodle loves to do this crazy, incredibly fast zooming about. I have a large yard so Fred gets a lot of exercise running around with our other dog--and my partner takes the dogs for a walk or run in the woods at least once a day. So you really need to figure out if you have the time, energy and place or space for such a high energy dog. Doodles are really great, fun dogs, but there are other breeds that are great also. The most important thing is to find a dog that really fits into your life.
 
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Hi Faith:

I just recently got a 3.5 month old puppy. I travel for work at least once per week (overnight). I have a house with a yard so when I leave I leave Maya in the garage (I keep nothing in the garage so it is puppy safe) and she can have the garage for shelter and she is able to go into the yard to run around. I have had her for a month now and it works for us. When I am on a trip my friends come over to feed her and let her inside for the night and then back out in the morning. I also have a pet sitter come in around noon on the days I'm gone and play with her. The days I am not traveling I work from home so she is with me. And on weekends since I have had her I spend most of the time with her. My 2 best friends have dogs so if we are going out at night we make sure to have a play date in the afternoon for a few hours to make sure the babies are tired so they will just sleep while we are out. My advise would be to look for a little older of a puppy but that is my opinion.
 
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