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Discussion Starter #1
We have some new foriegn students joining us & I am just writing up our list of house rules & requests. I want to explain to them in simple language how we expect them to behave around Dulcie, so as to not be intimidated or to scare here with their over excitement etc. It is just to exhausting for us as a fmaily & for DUlcie when we have to constantly watch over her to make sure she isn't freaking them out or gettign freaked out by them. They often give off the wrong vibes as they come from cultures that are nto used to dogs beign in the house. She has done so well over the last few weeks of it just being us at home, that I don't want to go back to dragging her into the kitchen all the time or shutting her out because other people don't know how to behave around her.

Do you have any good phrases/sentences I can add to the list. I have also been searching for the post which mentioned a sign to put on the front door for help with training a dog with new visitors, does anyone have this?

Thanks Lolly
 

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I'm not sure what rules you want to have. Do you want them to ignore Dulcie? be friendly? quiet?

One thing I would make sure of is that they have a garbage can with a lid! I would have a rule that all food items be disposed of properly. Are these types of stainless steel cans available near you?



We have these in the kitchen, office and bathroom. I just got sick of trying to keep Charlie out of the garbage. It was easier to remove the temptation.

Deb
 

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I would put up a Do Not Feed the DOG sign, a cute friendly one, but a gentle reminder that she's not to get xtra food. It's hard to see a cute furbaby and not offer them a snack.

Let them know that she has had a weight issue and is on a strick diet - if she is allowed carrots and likes them, you may allow them to give her one or two baby carrots when they leave so she associates them as friendly, not enemy, but be very insistant about them not giving her anything else

I agree that a covered trash can is a must if she will have any access to their space and no food on counters, tables etc.

I'd also let them know that is they have ANY problem with Dulcie at all that they come to you immediately and let you know as you should be the one disciplining her, not your lodgers

I wish you the best of luck and hope these lodgers work out great for you !

 

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I think I would mention that you have a pet dog and while it might take a little time for them to get used to one another, she is part of your house hold. I'm assuming that the guests will be staying for an extended amount of time, not just for a week? If so, mention that if they want to keep their stuff where they put it, then to put it away or keep the door closed to their room(s). If it's exchange students you're housing, then they'll become like one of the family soon enough.

The fact that it's your house and your pet I would think they should accept Dulcie pretty well. It might be a real education for them. I think all young people can remember something in their lives that include some sort of living thing, whether it be cattle, a horse or what ever that could be called a pet of some sort. Maybe "Please don't feed the dog" or "Be sure to put all your possessions away" will help take some negativity out of the rules.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
We've had exchange students, dancers & lodgers stay with us over the years with no problems with Dulcie, but recently we had three Nigerians stay with us that did not get along with a dog in the house at all. One of the girls had a great fear & would scream, run around the house and jump on top of furniture! This of course would nto only upset the family karma but also overexcite Dulcie & scare her too. They would also leave food out all the time, despite many requests not to do so. It put all of ours & Dulcie's good work with guests & food back a few steps, btu over Christmas we have managed to get things calm & back on track. I am hoping that the new students are a little more understanding of pets.

Lolly
 

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Discussion Starter #8
yes, they were rude, in many ways - so were asked to leave in the end.

I came home early once, and I can't be certain, but think they were antagonising her through the gate. She was so unsettled during their time here, as we all were, therefore, I don't want any of the family to have to go through again.
 

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Do these students know ahead of time that they are going into a house with a pet dog?

I don't know how exchange students are matched up with host families, but I think it would be helpful if there was some kind of screening to determine any mis-matches before they ever stepped in the door, like if they'd prefer a pet-free home or something like that.
 

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In addition to letting your boarders know not to feed the dog--not to leave food in reach--and to put their chewable things such as shoes and cellphones out of reach--you may want to give a little talk on how in your house (or culture) dogs are considered part of the family, almost like a child (and for some of us the equivalent). I have a friend from Kenya who when she first came here, found it very surprising how much we treat dogs like a member of the family. She said in Kenya, most people kept a dog to scare off animals/people from the yard and that they generally were kept outside. Cared for, but not pampered. I have shared pics of my dogs in their Halloween costumes and in their Christmas outfits, etc and she sends them to her sister in Kenya, who thinks these pics of my pampered dogs are the funniest things ever.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Yes, the schools know that there is a large dog in the family, and I ask that they check whether the students will be okay with that. Somehow the last students seemed to have slippe dthrough the net on that one. I offered that they go stay somewhere else - and wish now that I had insisted on it, as it did cause to omany problems.

Two new students arrived late last night & I had written up a long list of things, inc. behaviour around Dulcie, staying calm, not leavign food out etc - and these girls seem like they are going to take note, although they are very timid (they are from Korea), I think they are going to be ok.

I originally thought that Dulcie would work well as a support dog for me as I have some disabilities, but I need to iron out some of these problems first.
 

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I think some rules are common courtesty and common sense

1. Dog is on Diet please do not feed

2. Please keep your door closed at all times and pick up after yourself.
any socks, shoes, shirts laying around can possibly be harmful to my dog's digestive system and to your budget.

3.DOG In in Training ....please try to ingore dog unless you ask to pet etc.
thank you.

Now this is not easy i am sure but can be done.
look at it this way if you can...I have 3 teenagers that used to have friends over and i myself applied these rules

NOW when 2 of my teenagers visit us and yes have friends, i ask the same rules. I ask them to ignore dog till they calm down, no treats as my dogs will suffer with gas/mushy poops, 2 are in classes now,
and i hate crating a dog for a time out due to someone NOT adhering to RULES they broke and then dogs followed suit. (jumping etc)

at 1st pepple go "what?!" but once they fall into place you get more repect all the way around

OH i have strong rubber bands on botton cabinets in my house. makes it hard for dogs and teenagers think twice about bothering

I sure hope this helps in soem way
and If you put forth rules from day 1 ...and yes reenforce them continuously it may help

in past i had inlaws from France sometimes bring their cat, hubby and another kid withthem...and STAY for a MONTH every summer.
I felt like a witch...but with RULES in place after a week things got better
and i got respect
 

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This reminds me of when I studied abroad in Spain during college. Except for the fact that my host family had a German Shepherd that was trained to attack.

They HAD to keep that dog chained up so it wouldn't harm us and when they went out they would purposely leave him by the phone so we couldn't use it to dial home to America.

Had our program known this they never would have placed us there.

I would suggest having an orientation when the lodgers get there and explain the rules very clearly.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Hi guys, thanks for the support & advice. All is going well, apart from one hiccup, where the stairgate & the students door was accidently left open. Dulcie sneaked straight up there, bit through a black holdall, broke the zipper & ate two large gift boxes of chocolate on one of the girl's beds! Dulcie had an upset tummy & the girl was very tearful at not only slacking on the rules given to them about doors, etc but also that her lovely chocs & bag have been ruined. I have offered to replace them this time, but I think if anything happens again, it would be there own responsibility.

Laura
 

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Laura it does THOUGH sound like you're off to a much BETTER START
with these boarders.

i don't know if this would help ...i write blog articles for this site

one is called Quality Assurance Inspectors
you might want to read it and/or give them all a copy of it

its' a lightedhearted humorous way of saying DOOODLES eat things!!
or chew them
click on teh link below my name .....if not click this link and go to
bottom of page
http://blog.labradoodle-dogs.net/2007/12/
 
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