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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Doc is now 8 months old (today) and he is driving me nuts. He keeps pestering my toy poodle (I keep commanding him to leave it, which he is getting a little better at, but he keeps going back to her). He's started barking when he wants something or wants attention. (A really sharp, ear piercing bark) I try to play fetch with him when he gets like this, but he's not interested. I take him for one walk per day (he could probably use two, but, frankly, I don't want to take him for two walks because I have a horse that I try to train and ride every day and it's just too tiring to do it all)
He makes life very stressful. I'm feeling like I would give him up if the right home came along. I think he would really benefit if he lived with a large dog that he could play with, but, I do NOT want to get another dog. I love animals and have raised several puppies, but, none were like Doc.

Thanks for listening. I really do love him but I don't like the stress he's adding to my life right now. :(
 

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I sure know how it feels to be discouraged. My doods were really a handful too, sometimes. If it helps, I seem to recall that 8-9 months was really difficult. I think they're having some challenging developmental issues at this point. My doods did burn off a lot of energy just running and chasing each other. And we really had to step up the training then, too. I also learned at that time that I had to stay really calm around them all the time...they seemed to pick up on any excitement (especially if it was me yelling or clapping) and turn it into more excitement.

I can't blame him for wanting to play with your poodle, though, or for not being able to understand that he can't.

Here are a few suggestions I would try:

1) A dog park, or doggy day care, or visit from another big dog a couple of days a week for a while.

2) Create a "safe zone" for your poodle where Doc can't get to him. We use the an indoor transmitter that works with the same collar as our outdoor underground fence. But baby gates would work, too.

3) Use your walk time to train, train, train. Make lots of eye contact with Doc and a calm voice. Does he chase a frisbee or a tennis ball? Exercise will help.

He'll grow up a lot in the next few months, too.

My doods are now 13 months old and still have a few bad habits, but they have also grown considerably more attuned to my direction (or is it that I have grown more attuned to them?)... and they are now almost 100% delight. Let us know how this goes. There's a lot of support here.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for the reply 2Doods. I do all of the things you have suggested. Doc loves the dog park but he keeps getting eye infections after we go there so I don't really want to go there all the time. He also gets all wet and slobbered on, too, which is gross. He loves it more than his walks though. He doesn't like to play fetch with a tennis ball or a frisbee, which I find very frustrating. It would be so fun to play that with him and I am disappointed he isn't the "retriever" that he is supposed to be. :(

I can't blame him for wanting to play with the poodle either but, I can't let it become an obsession. To me, it's the same as if he wanted to chase the cat all the time. He would need to learn not to do that.

I have taken him to two obedience class sessions already and we start a third on Wednesday. I practice the lessons every day. I've read training books too. The thing is, is he's the first dog I've had to do all this with. My other dogs were just very easy and I guess I expected Doc to be that easy, too, since I think Poodles are the best dogs (I used to have a Standard Poodle too) and Doc is 3/4 poodle. Maybe the difference is he's a male and all my other large dogs were females.

I do stay very calm with him at all times. My poodle does have a safe zone and sometimes I put her in there just to get some peace but, I don't think she should have to go in there all the time since she was here first.

Doc outgrew his crate so we put him in the laundry room when we go places and have to leave him for a little while. Sometimes when he is especially wild, I put him in there for a while to calm down. I've been thinking of tethering him in the family room when he won't leave things alone so he can still be with us. I'd like to teach him the command "Park it" and have him lay down on his bed in the family room.

Well, it helps to know that your dogs improved and Doc just might be going through an especially difficult stage right now. I really hope that he is not going to be a terror for his whole life.
 

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You're not argumentative...just stressed!
You have a rebellious, high spirited teenager on your hands.

How old is the poodle? Our neighbor has a 9 year old Shiuz zu and he'll tolerate the younger dogs for awhile...but when he's had enough he'll let them know it.
Archie is 5 months and Chester is 2 years. We often separate them so Chester gets a break or if he seems less that his usually playful self...then I feel bad for him like he's being isolated. We've also come to be able to see when Archie is in his storm before the calm state. He'll go and go and then just drop.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Hi Chesterpal, Sarah is 7 years old. She's very playful with me, but she's also a wimp so she starts yelping and making horrible sounds when Doc tries to play with her. When she retreats from him, he chases after her. She only weighs about 7 lbs. and Doc weighs about 70! She does try to snarl and bite at his face and ears but it has no effect whatsoever. Doc doesn't bat an eye! I had Sarah and two other larger dogs all at the same time, but the other two dogs were older and have since died in the last few years. So, she's used to being around other dogs, she just isn't used to being around a HUGE puppy!
 

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Bless your heart.... I didn't think you were being argumentative either. It IS stressful sometimes. It's hard for any of us who are not there to help figure out little (!) Doc. As I said before, I sure had my share of days when I was ready to give up...I think it was at around 8 months that George snagged the palm of my hand with a tooth and made a fairly serious wound. He wasn't trying to bite, he was just waving his big happy mouth around and my hand was in the wrong place, but I was really bummed out. Like you, I had never had a dog do such a thing, and I've had dogs all of my life. So I fully sympathise.

But I am glad that I outlasted that stage and now George is mellow and funny most of the time. I'm no expert, but I think Chesterpal's "rebellious, high sprited teenager" quote is perfect for this age.

Surely there are folks out there with some more suggestions for you.... Ya'll......
 

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I am sorry that you are going through this...actually I think that if you can get through this one, you might just make it to a mellower dog! As they get past the year mark, they begin to settle...for the most part.

I don't know what your financial situation is, but if you could find the right trainer, I would suggest that you take your dog to a training facility...the kind that take the dog for a week or two and train them! Then when you pick the dog up, they train you...

And if you follow through with what they tell you to do, your dog really benefits.

We did that with 3 of our dogs and it was so hard to see them go for that long...but the result was amazing!

How about calling your breeder...maybe they can help...

It is hard for me to give any suggestions beyond those wise ones already given...every dog is different so no one thing works for every dog...still, I think it sounds like your dog is just really energetic. Say, is there any way you could take your dog on a long lead when you are riding your horse? Just an idea.

If not, what about hiring a dog walker? I have a dog walker come over every day...that way I know that my dogs get exercise and I don't have to do it! LOL

Good luck!
 

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Oh gosh! Puppies are one thing but 70 pound puppies are something else entirely! I have a 60 pound-ball-of-high-energy pup myself. He gets a 45 minute daily walk and a 30-45 minute swim every night which seems to help. He has a Rotweiller friend that he terrorizes and he makes us crazy wanting to play "his version" of fetch with his ball! To relieve you a bit, you might want to look into a doggie treadmill. I'm looking into that right now because I don't know how I'll channel Dakota's energy this winter without the pool! Doggie treadmills are highly recommended by Ceasar Millan--he claims they do the energy-burning trick! Hang in there--it will get better. I've already noticed some "calming" in 9 month old Dakota--in fact, I've noticed a marked difference over the last month, so there is hope for Doc!

Here's one site for doggie treadmills, but there are many others, and you could probably find one used and cheaper.
http://www.pawwws.com/

Diane (and Dakota)
 

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I love the treadmill idea! I've seen Cesar use one on his tv show..... it was just a standard treadmill and I'm sure he has some recommmendations about how to first accustom your pup to use it. If my doods didn't have each other to wear themselves out with I can see that a treadmill would have been a great benefit. The dog seemed to absolutely love it... which surprised the heck out of me.....because I HATE the treadmill!!! And I need it more than anyone. lol
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks for the replies everyone. Doc must have read the posts and decided he better straighten up a little! He's been better yesterday and today. I think the "leave it" is starting to sink in a little better.

I have a treadmill and have been thinking about using it for Doc. (I love to watch Cesar and I also have his book. I just need to get up the gumption to try him on it. It seems like it could be disastrous on the first attempt!

Thanks again for the encouragement!
 

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IMHO Newby style! Lol! Doc is a teenager and he will test you to the limit! He is old enough to settle, and you are in charge! Every dog is different, some respond with correction and some with reward for good behavior, some need both, or maybe a distraction. If you can find what works best for him and get him under your control, you will have a wonderful life long friend! I was told years ago it only takes 10 to 15 mins. a day, EACH and EVERY DAY to have a well behaved dog. I hang little notes up to this day, saying 10 mins. only, and once I get started, the pup is worn out before me! Pups love to learn and get just as tired as a long run in the woods, as they do from learning, they want to please you and thrive on training, whether it is OB or tricks! Just remember he is a teenager feeling his oats! He will grow up!

Denise
 

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gosh every dog I have is different and your dog is exactly like a white female standard poodle I had. I sent her to camp :) 5 weeks and she came back better but still not exactly what I wanted. its certainly not you because each dog I raise the same and they all turn out different! my 70 pound dood loves to antagonize the 4 pound poodle, but he does it rarely which is nice, but he does it with barking and running in circles. dont know what people think about electric collars here, but I am brave enough to say I love them. There are many techniques I use for different trainings, mouse traps are a favorite for digging in houseplants getting on counters or in trash, but we use an electric dog fence outside and we have a correction collar for inside. I cant tell you when the last time I used it was, probably a year and my dogs are 2 now.

oh another thing if thats not your style, water works pretty well. that white standard I mentioned would try to eat the cat so much I thought I would have to get rid of her. the trainer had me get a refill softsoap container (they have a large hole for an opening and carry a lot of water). You very simply give your "stop" command, then immediately spray tons of water on them if they dont listen. That was extremely effective for us.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Thanks for the encouragement Denise. And welcome to the board. I think I do need to be a little firmer with him. I'm always afraid I'm squelching his puppiness. I'm willing to play with him to burn off his energy, it's just that most of the time he doesn't want to play anything constructive when he gets in his moods where he wants to play with my poodle. I think I finally found something that he likes to play. He has a stuffed bear that I play tug with him a little bit, then command him to drop it, then throw it a little ways. I give him the command, but, then I have to pry his mouth off the bear. Do you know if this will teach him to let go willingly, or is there some other way to teach drop it? (He's funny because if I throw something too far, he just stands there and looks at it and won't go get it. That's why it is puzzling to me that he seems to have energy, yet he doesn't want to work too hard.)
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Movistar - I only just now saw your response. We must have been typing a response at the same time when you added yours. Those are great suggestions. There are so many things I forget. I've heard about using a spray bottle before, but I didn't think to try it for the issue with my toy poodle. I never tried it before because Doc likes sprinker water, but, if it's a large amount, that might work. You are right that each dog is an individual. Just because I used to have the PERFECT Standard Poodle doesn't mean I'd get another one like her. Thanks for the help.
 
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