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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi, I am considering getting a miniature labradoodle. We have allergies and have researched non-shedding breeds. We came down to the miniature labradoodle or small medium and the Bichon frise. But some have told us that bichons and small breeds are really hard to housetrain. We have no yard and have two children so want a mellow dog that is excellent with children and isn't that hard to housetrain.
I've been seen too many labradoodles on this forum looking for new homes. Why is that? are many owners buying them without carfuly considering the responsability of dog ownership? or are some labradoodles hard to live with (given their temperament, bad breeding practices, etc)

:oops: :p
 

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Hi and Welcome

its good that you are doing research

my guess for all the labradoodles in rescue is the same reason there are 10,000 plus labrador retrievers and prob 250,000 plus other breed and mix breed dogs in shelters or sadly abandoned and living on the streets. Mainly because people get a dog without thinking about the long term committment, they see a cute cuddly puppy and fall in love but that puppy grows up and lived on average 8-15 yrs depending on the breed. They pee in the house, they eat things, they jump, they need TONS of love and attention, they cost $$$$$$ , they need good food, Vet at least once a year for shots sometimes more depending on the dog and if they develop any illnesses or injuries

I have had a mutt (15 yrs) and 4 labrador retrievers and now a labradoodle, I have loved them all, never begrudged spending money on them when it was needed and even when it was not needed (toy central here :wink: )

Anyhow, I do Not think it has anything to do with the breed but has to do with people getting dogs that have NO committment to the dog they get :evil:

Personally, if someone offered me a labradoodle or a bichon, I"d take the Labradoodle any day, but that's my personal preference, our friends had a bichon and she was the most hyper, yappy dog I ever came across in my life - I dont know if it's the breed or was just there dog but it turned me off Bichons, plus I prefer a larger dog myself

Good luck in your search - remember that not all dog allergies are to dander, some people are allergic to the saliva, so being licked can cause an allergic reaction - I don't think there are any truly non-allergic dogs, just ones that are less likely to cause a reaction to some people
 
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Well said Mary! Maya has been on the mellower side of puppies I think. However she gets tons of exercise. When she was little she had a playdate at least 3 times a week. And walks daily. She was completely potty trained with in a month (Only had about 5-10 accidents in the house total). When house training....she came to me from the breeders knowing how to use a doggy door and that going outside was perferred. So that made it easier. Once I got her signal down we were in sync. (Plus I took her out every hour) She doesn't chew things she not supposed to. There again I was diligent when she was young to correct her when she started to chew something she shouldn't.

So if you are considering a mini labradoodle keep in mind this dog loves its people and prefers to be with them and not left alone. They require attention, love, exercise, and patience. I have had Maya now for 7 mos and the progress she has made in training is amazing to me. She still has a way to go til she is the perfect dog but I'll get her there.
 

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mebesa said:
I've been seen too many labradoodles on this forum looking for new homes. Why is that? are many owners buying them without carfuly considering the responsability of dog ownership? or are some labradoodles hard to live with (given their temperament, bad breeding practices, etc)
:oops: :p
hello and WELCOME!!!
I think one reason that Labradoodles are offered on this site and others is because there ARE people here who will give them happy homes! That is obvious, maybe, but maybe not. And I think you are also onto something about people not considering carefully all the responsibilities of owning a Puppy or a Labradoodle.

Breeding and breeding practices might be another factor. How much people time has a puppy had before leaving the litter? But there's another factor that isn't as obvious: I have known and heard of customers, and breeders even, who didn't realize what it might mean to buy a Doodle who was bred from a hunting/field trial champion line of Labradors: they have MUCH higher energy than some other Labradors, for obvious reasons. So it makes a difference. And it's not an indictment on anyone for not knowing, of course, but learning and watching and talking to lots of people really does help when choosing something as important as a Doodle for a lifetime of fun and love.

If you have looked around I'm sure you've seen a variety of breeding practices, and so I have said several times that it's important to choose a breeder you can support before choosing a puppy to love. ALL of us have cute puppies! (even puppy mills/pet stores fit that description)

WELCOME!! And keep us posted on where and how you find your Doodle!
 

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Cacao is a mini and she was trained in less then a week. I did get those bells. http://www.poochie-pets.net/ That helped us know she wanted to go out but she was potty trained for sometime before we go those. We didn't know she needed to go out. She would just set by the door and sometimes she would go out and other times she wouldn't. So now she just rings the bell and we take her out.
 

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HI Mebesa...you're right you will find doodles on this site for adoption, rehomes, etc
why? cause we feel we can trust many members on this site to be sincere in giving doodles a loving home as well as those that are getting their 2nd one already know how they are and understand them quite well.

I myself need to rehome a doodle and will ONLY post him on this forum.
I will NOT advertise in the paper, other and/or free sites at all.

I already had a great experience with Leslie adopting a doodle that my breeder had me foster for a rehome.......KIRBY got an awesome loving home with a doodle playmate too,named DEX :D

also ...i get to see pics of Kirby and always hear how he's doing
same with happen with BEAU when he goes to a forever home with a forum member in the future.

NOW there is also a few that have gotten Doodles without really researching this breed first not realizing they are real people dogs, highly intelligent and need attention with lots of love and some training and/or tasks/commands to do.

me? i wouldn't go back for a second. My life and my family are so happy we finally let Doodles into our lives!! they're the best, they're comical, they're like other mischievious puppies at times and
they're sooooooooooo loving
 

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Being in my second week of doodle ownership, I can truly say that raising a puppy is alot of work. I read many books and many of the posts on this site before our puppy came home and OMG I am exhausted at the end of the day.

But I wouldn't trade Remy for the world. My DH told me last night that when I left the house in the morning Remy sat in front of the slider with a forlorn look on his face and looks at DH and with his paw rang the poochie bell.

Isn't that just the cutest!
 

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Hi Mebesa, I am glad that you joined our forum...and very glad that you are asking these important questions.
I considered sending you a private message, but decided that what I have to say is important for all people considering a Labradoodle.
You seem to have some serious issues that you must consider (your health and ability to exercise the pup, the fact that it will be crated for long periods on a regular basis, and now your uncertainty regarding the personality and temperament of doodles...all of which are EXCELLENT concerns and I do not wish to make light of them.)
It would be easy for me to lightheartedly tell you that you are concerned for no reason, that doodles are great, friendly, loving dogs...which they are GENERALLY. But the reality is that not all of them are. Some are not bred by quality breeders and you may well get a puppy with issues.
Most doodles train extremely quickly, but that requires a lot of time and dedication on the part of the owner.
If you are crating your puppy for 5 or more hours per day, you are not able to physically exercise with a puppy or if you are unable to spend the necessary time to train the pup, you are wise to question whether or not a doodle (or other dog) is right for you.
Dogs don't come hardwired as perfect companions. It takes a lot of work and patience...and with doodles, it takes a lot of attention and love.
If you do not have these things to give, then it is probable that you WOULD have problems with your puppy.
We absolutely adore our dogs...but we have had them eat furniture, shoes, plants, insullation, cell phones, etc. Why? Because we are not as good with the training as we should be!
We have barking dogs too, but it is not the dog's fault...it is ours. So, I am speaking from experience, and with a sincere attitude of helpfulness (not blind support) in telling you that, given your questions, I would suggest that you continue to research...that you, perhaps, offer to dog sit a puppy for a couple of weeks and see what happens.
I really do hope that your selection will fit into your lives because our dogs have brought us nothing but joy and happiness...but that has not come without a price. I guess I am asking you to consider the price...it is far better to NOT buy a puppy than to find out later (after the dog has fallen in love with you and your family) that you don't want to be a dog owner any longer.
(Please note that there are many good and loving people who have had to rehome doodles and I am not judging them...I am simply asking you to consider all things, including what is right for your pupppy.)
I wish you the best...I really do!
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thank you jac

I have had dogs before, but I either had a yard or had a small dog (bichon frise, and schnauzer) And I have never met a labradoodle in person. That is why I want to find out as much as I can about the breed.
For example I nw that Bichons are very lovely, gentle, and quiet but they can develop serious separation anxiety even if left alone only for 4 hours once a week. And that they are really hard to house train, they will escape an in less than a peep go do their business somewhere unapropiate.
And for min. schnauzers they are really clean, smart, love to travel. But I am unsure of their ability to cope with children. :lol:
 

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I posted elsewhere about how we exercise our mini/medium doodle, Remy. I just wanted to add about Remy and children, since how your dog gets along with kids seems important to you. My kids are currently 12, 9 and 3. When we got Remy our youngest was 2 1/2.

First of all, Remy is absolutely wonderful with the kids. She is patient, loving and has never snapped or even growled at them. On the other hand, it was really tough having a new puppy and an active 2-year-old. We had all the problems of Remy thinking my son was another puppy and nipping and jumping on him. She always wanted to chew all his toys and it was impossible to keep them picked up! My son thought it was funny to let Remy out of her crate when I was upstairs and even let her out of the house a few times. I had to constantly supervise both of them and would count the hours each day until my older kids got home from school to help.

Now that Remy is almost 1 and my son is 3 1/2, things are much better but I still don't leave them alone together for more than a few minutes. My son adores Remy and she treats him like an annoying little brother. Remy is fantistic with my older daughters. She sleeps in their room at night and my 9-year-old completed our beginning obedience class with her as the handler (they even won a trophy!). This summer my 9-year-old will start agility with Remy.

So, in my experience, doodles are great with kids but first the doodles (and the kids) need a lot of supervision and training. Good luck with your decision!
 

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One more thing -- Remy's breeder hires neighborhood kids to socialize her puppies, so Remy was already comfortable with children when we got her. Remy and her mother were both very friendly when we met them and Remy went right up to my daughter and cuddled in her arms. We also had histories of Remy's father and both sets of grandparents and all of them were good with kids, so we felt pretty comfortable that Remy would get along well with kids. I'm sure some doodles are more timid or skittish and wouldn't be happy living with little children.
 
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