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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Okay everyone, HIIC (Head Imbecile In Charge) here...

I do believe that I need to get some weed n feed/spring fertilizer down on the lawn and turn on the sprinklers, as the weather has turned for the better and I think things will be ready to go for the season.

I fairly well have no clue when it comes to fertilizer and pets. Common sense says NOT GOOD to mix the two. However, the reality of the furry boy needing to use the facilities (back yard) and him being in the front yard playing, etc I am looking for information. So, take me to school and lets see what happens.

Is there a minimum time between application and safe to let him out? Are there better brands than others that are pet friendly?
What do you do with your lawn?
Thanks!
 

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Keith-

Hi there. I will be of no help to you, however, your post is timely. We are in the exact same situation as you, and I am also very anxious to hear what the scoop is on fertilizer/weed 'n' feed. :)
 

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Good morning!

I had no clue about what to say regarding this topic, so I did a quick google search and came up with a bazillion links...the first one warned against using cooca mulch! Said it is extremely dangerous to pets, smells like chocolate and attracts them.

Then I read a site that listed the major ingredients to be aware of, but mostly they are in pesticides but it had good info:

"1. How can I tell which pet products contain dangerous chemicals?

Check the product label's Active Ingredients list. If a product contains any of the seven common organophosphates, don't buy it. The seven organophosphates are chlorpyrifos, dichlorvos, phosmet, naled, tetrachlorvinphos, diazinon and malathion. Also avoid products containing carbamates. The two chemical names to watch out for and avoid are carbaryl and propoxur. Again, check the listing of Active Ingredients."

Then this was about fertilizer:

"The most serious problems resulting from fertilizer ingestion in pets are usually due to the presence of heavy metals such as iron. Ingestion of large amounts of fertilizer could cause severe gastric upset and possibly gastrointestinal obstruction."

And, finally, here is a good link to poisons and pets: http://sammemmolo.com/poisonous_to_pets.htm

And this was just the first page of the google search! :wink: Hope it helps!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks Jac, I did see all that when I did the search, but there is also the value of hearing from peoiple on their personal experience...

Guess Ill see if anyone else chimes in with stuff they did/didnt do and go from there. Otherwise, I will just trust the power of Google.
 

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Keith,

I'm no expert either but was in a similar situation. Here's what I did (not sure if I was right or wrong). Last weekend rain was in the forecast so I fertilized my front yard and kept the dog strictly in the back. It rained and the fertilizer did whatever it does and was gone. Looks like more rain coming this weekend so I plan to do my backyard and let my dog use the front until it has worked its way in. My dog likes to eat the grass on occasion so that has been a concern.
 

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My father used to have a lawn service that said the stuff they put down would dissipate within 24 hours if put down before rain or watering in. I never read the label for what they had, but perhaps there are products that absorb in quickly. Also--if you have a grub problem, milky spore (a natural product, although i think dogs should still be kept off lawn) works great, and it is not a poison. The bags cost a lot more than the poison, but it evens out in cost since a bag covers a lot of ground.
This is all probably academic for me, since Fred has been digging holes all over the lawn--luckily some are along the deck where I was planning on putting in some shrubs.
 

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Just a note about the mikky spore. It is very effective against grubs but will take a couple of years to be come fully effective. It is a natural product and as the grubs eat the milky sopre and die they begin to decompose and the milky spore multiplies. this bit of info below is from the clemson site listed. This addresses only a specific problem not the issue of fertilizer for the lawn. Will keep looking.

Microbial insecticides are especially valuable because their toxicity to nontarget animals and humans is extremely low.


http://hgic.clemson.edu/factsheets/HGIC2770.htm :D
 

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Check out this site - organic lawn care. They recommend a brand called Ringer because it has nothing scary in the ingredient list, says it looks like rabbit food. I have seen it in our local garden and feed store. hope this helps.:D

http://www.richsoil.com/lawn/index.jsp
 

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We have put a weed and feed type thing on the yard and the directions say to keep children and pets off the yard for 24 hours. We do the one yard at a time thing with good results. Cinnamon also likes to eat grass. Are doodles part cow? :lol: Sometimes I think she's part goat. She will try just about anything.
 
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