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Thanks Jac

This one was new to me,, there was another post also that linked to several other ideas too
but i have to tell you the more i read the more i feel it is more nutritional needs being met then genetic or predisposed to this disease
who knows, sounds like its all just grasping at straws in most cases

We can only do what we can do,,if there is no gentic marker we are breeders Not Gods :?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Well, I agree...in fact, when I read the info I was struck by the part where they say 1) they don't KNOW the cause and 2) it could be VIRAL....then they say it could be genetic. Well, if they don't know, and if it could be viral...and since it goes away without long term effects, I think it is really important to show that science is really a "best guess" situation...and that it is easy to label something as "genetic" and close the book.
I tend to see the viral connection as very interesting.
Most importantly, I like the fact that it gives dog owners some idea of what to ask for if their dog is exhibiting some form of this disease. I have always assumed that lameness would be injury related.
I also like the fact that they can test for this.
The more information we have, the better "parents" we become.
I sincerely appreciated you posting the link. (Although I am never one to jump onto the "genetics" bandwagon too quickly any more.)
 

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LOL @ the gentic bandwagon

Isnt that the truth,,lordy lordy,,i cant get over some people,,every thing is NOT genetic,,sheesh

THere are really no guarantees in this world is there
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
What I have found is that when they (doctors, scientists, etc.) don't know, they say it is genetic and to remove the dog from a breeding program...and, frankly, they CAN'T know without genetic markers, unless there is a test litter or unless the puppies already born are affected.
Pretty drastic either way.
Also, every single living creature has bad genetics in the package deal and it will come out if that creature breeds to another with the same genetic marker...so, yes, it is a gamble.
We do the best we can when we test for known propensities, but even then, there are no promises.
Still, when we are willing to stand behind the health of our puppies and to support the emotional well being of the families (should a negative trait be found.) And when, at those times, we look beyond finances to emotions and suffering and make honorable choices then I think we are being responsible breeders.
It is also very important that we make it clear to our customers (BEFORE they buy) that nothing in life, including the health of these wonderful dogs, is certain.
What really bothers me is when people sell these puppies as the "perfect breed"...because they are not perfect...pretty darned close! But not perfect.
When you are dealing with life, with nature, there is no way to prevent the unfortunate circumstances that go hand in hand with the miracle of creation...and if we respect that, and do our best to safeguard the puppies we help to create, and we make a lifetime commitment to those puppies...then that is all we can do.
Okay...I'll step down, off of my soapbox now.
 

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Otto has suffered from Panosteitis, it is a form of growing pains, it traveled form the front leg after medication was gone, then appeared again in his back leg for a period of time and again in the front. The vet gave him medication for pain and inflamation, he said he would grow out of this. I have cut down on his protien and he is a lot better now
 

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Ohhh is that what growing pains are called,,LOL

thats what i always recommend for growing pups,
in any case it all falls back to nutrition,, dang im good,,LMAO :lol:
 

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I found it interesting that panosteitis became a problem about the time that the modified live vaccine for distemper became widely available. I would like to know what percentage of dogs who have developed it had received the modified live distemper vaccine. Or been exposed to dogs who had.

The holistic view is that most of us over-vaccinate our pets. I am NOT a vet, and am Not offering medical advice, but I have attended a lecture by a holistic vet who opined that most dogs have a long term term immunity in young adulthood if they received the appropriate vaccines at the right ages. Vets in increasing numbers opine that it may not be necessary to vaccinate every single year.

Since vaccinations are such a cash cow for our vets, they don't tend to tell us that they are not necessary, in fact many are not aware of it. It is possible to titer the antibody levels for different ailments, though the titer tests can be a bit pricey, too.

That being said, I can't agree more that nutrition is crucial to good health. Lameness in young horses is frequently induced by a diet too high in protein during the growth years. I haven't studied it yet in the canine world, but it stands to reason that it could be similar.
 
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