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My husband is going bananas!!!! He says I need to train Lucca to stop jumping on people who come over to visit. Lucca (almost 8 mths old) goes crazy when people come over. She can't stop jumping on them (and has even scratched a couple of kids in the face!) She just gets so excited to see people...but, it's really a problem. She doesn't care if people put their knees out to stop her, if she gets pushed down, or even if she gets hit. I try to just hold on to her collar and tell her no jump. This really doesn't work.

After the visitors are here for awhile she is fine..and very calm.

Any ideas? My husband insists I TRAIN her appropriately...not sure what else I can do. Any advise or similar stories would help. Do you think she will grow out of the jumping up?
 

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We are dealing with the same thing.
Have you thought of obedience training? We signed Boone up and start March 21st (feels a year away). They deal with this behaviour problem and other issues with you.
 

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Sadie jumps on visitors too. The worst part is that they pet her and make a fuss over her when she does it, which reinforces the jumping. I always ask them not to pet her, but they usually say it's ok, they don't mind, they have a dog too, etc. That makes it really hard.

I guess the best thing to do is to put on the lead and keep your foot on it so the dog can't jump when visitors come to the door. I have tried that a couple of times (when I remembered) and it physically stops them from jumping but I don't know if it's training them not to jump when the lead is not attached.
 

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The hard part is getting company to help you. Explain to them that although they dont mind, you need their help to train good behavior. When a dog jumps on a person they get three things: a push or a pat - both physical contact, spoken to or yelled at - both verbal contact, and eye contact. It is these things that the dog looks for, wether in a positive form or negative. One thing that often works is to have your company turn their back at the door when the dog goes to jump. Eventually the dog will sit. Than have the company turn toward the dog if he goes to jump turn your back again (and do not speak to the dog or correct him verbably). When your dog has all four feet on the ground than you can praise him or have company praise him. It takes time but it does work for some. Sticking out a knee works for some as well but the dog is still getting a physical contact, verbalization, and eye contact.

I had a shepherd that would claw my back when i turned around. I had to change what I was doing to: when she would jump I would grab her pays and start slightly squeezing until she yelped. At the same time I would be talking to her in a nice tone. She learned it was uncomfortable and soon kept her feet on the ground.

It also helps to work on sitting and staying when you open the door with no one there. I like to use clicker training to start with, b/c I find the dogs learn so fast with positive reinforcement.

I had company last night and she came from work with her white pants on. When she came to the door there was a big paw print on her leg. I am still working on my puppy. He is learning but still gets excited!
 

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Putting them on a leash is one of the best ways to break them and like someone else mentioned don't let them talk to the dog at all until the dog has settled down and then you give them permission. They then should still not make a big to do over the dog just pet him/her and go on their way. Keep treats by the door and when company comes and they are on thier leash tell them to sit and give them a treat keep rewarding them for the good behavior. Hope this helps. :wink:
 

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jumping up question

Hi, I'm sort of new at all of this myself, so I don't pretend to be an expert :lol: but I have been reading lots of dog training books, and one tip that seemed helpful was that when your dog jumps up, you should grab his two front legs and hold him up, only releasing when he looks uncomfortable. The book says (wish I could remember which one so that I could properly quote it) that dogs don't like to stand on their back two legs for long, so doing this should, in time, make your dog not want to jump up again! I am trying it on my thirteen week old puppy, and meeting with mixed success (just started it a few days ago). Good Luck! - Annemarie.
 

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Hi

I experienced this with my 2 doodles and the trainer has a brilliant way of stopping the jumping!! basically everytime your doodle jumps hold their paws and talk nicely to them as if this was normal for as long as you can a few minute should be enough- the point being they get tired of being on only 2 legs and try to pull away but hold on for a few further minutes. Get at least 4/5 different people to do the same time - they will get to know that when they jump their paws get held and they dont like it so they wont do it !!

worked with our 2 great!!

ash xx
 

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Great advice here! I like the idea of holding their paws.

I was thinking about the training that my dogs got at "boot camp" where they were taught "go to your spot"...they learned that I point to a place and they must go there until I release them.

We used prong collars during the training, but it was amazing. They (all 3) would go to the same rug, and stay there. It doesn't matter what they do in their spot, only that they stay. They can sit, stand, lie down, chase their tail...doesn't matter. They just have to stay until I say "release!" Then they know it is okay to be themselves again.

This works really well for many times...because the place is anywhere you point. You don't need a special rug, towell, bed, etc. And they stay there even when we play ball next to them, or walk by with treats. It is a great thing. If they begin to move off, we take their leash, bring them back to the spot, quick tug on the leash and say "stay in your spot" and they do. The trick is to be consistent.

Good luck!
 

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I use a squirt bottle filled with water and this really helps me with the jumping and when they start barking. I always keep the squirt bottle by the front door, when people come over, if Hyde starts to jump I squirt him and say no. Works well for me.

I heard you can also put a little bit of vinager in the bottle mixed with the water and that really helps cause they dont like the smell. Just dont get the eyes.
 

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I use a squirt bottle filled with water and this really helps me with the jumping and when they start barking. I always keep the squirt bottle by the front door, when people come over, if Hyde starts to jump I squirt him and say no. Works well for me.

I heard you can also put a little bit of vinager in the bottle mixed with the water and that really helps cause they dont like the smell. Just dont get the eyes.
 

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Well, I want you to know that I have tried holding my dog's paws when they jump and it works like a charm! My two older Labradoodles, stopped the first time, my Poodle never did jump so no problem...my Goldendoodle is a bit tougher...but she is just a baby still. She is only 6 months old. Anyway, thanks for telling us about that! It isn't painful, angry or unpleasant...it just helps them to know that they are not in control and I don't think that they like it!
 

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Re

Max was a lot like that too. To teach him not to jump effectively, we would bring our knee up and bump his chest everytime he did and say off. It didn't take long. We would play with him so he would get all excited and want to jump and after a few times, no more jumping.
 

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I did camando doggie trainig and he taught us two behaviors...
1.We put our dog on the prong collar...He would come up to us and pat his chest and do everything to get the dog to jump on him...If they started to jump we would pull on the prong collar and correct with a "off command "...they quikly learned not to jump on others even when encouraged..He would have a treat ...and do everything and they would just look at him and tilt their heads by the end of class.

I also find when I take my dog on walk ...I make her laydown for small children to pet her ...they see a little kid now and they want to lay down and roll on thier backs to get a pet. ...

It takes a lot of time and patience...and its probably going to be six or seven months before you see consistent behavior ...
 

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Jac said:
Well, I want you to know that I have tried holding my dog's paws when they jump and it works like a charm! My two older Labradoodles, stopped the first time, my Poodle never did jump so no problem...my Goldendoodle is a bit tougher...but she is just a baby still. She is only 6 months old. Anyway, thanks for telling us about that! It isn't painful, angry or unpleasant...it just helps them to know that they are not in control and I don't think that they like it!
excellent am so pleased - sooo simple and harmless!!!
 

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I sincerely thank you for posting this idea! I had never heard of it, but my dogs still don't jump up...sometimes they almost do, but catch themselves and stop.
The process never hurts them or frightens them. In fact, I hold their paws and talk nicely to them, soon they try to pull away and I keep holding and talking...after a while, I put their paws down and praise them for being on the ground. It is a great way to train this particular situation. Thanks!
 

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Yey - am soo pleased it is such a nice way rather than squirting or shouting or punishing them .

mine are the same they occasionally go to do it and i go to hold their paws and they are straight on the floor!!

all i need now is them to stop chasing birds and return to me and everything will be fine!!!!
 
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