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Hello everyone,

Kenai is 6 months old now. She quickly learned commands such as sit, lay down, leave it, stay over the months we've had her, so we know she has some brain cells working. She has also been through two training classes, the most recent one being a Canine Good Citizen class. Well, she failed the test in that class. She absolutely refused to lay down on command. She cocked her head at me in that very cute way of hers as if to say, "Lay down? I've NEVER heard that sound before...", even though she's done it a thousand times. I was so embarrassed. Then, during the part of the test where we have to walk nicely through a crowd she jumped all over every person, which is a big no-no. (Again, humiliating!) We have been working with her for months on not jumping up (OFF), but she ALWAYS jumps on people anyway. It's like she totally ignores us and doesn't care!

When we are in the yard she ignores our commands to come inside. In fact, she will run the other way, out of our yard, all over our neighborhood sometimes. If I have her on the leash, she strains and pulls to smell every little bunny trail all over the yard no matter if we've been outside 1/2 hour or 5 minutes.

Oh, one other thing. She knows she should go potty outside, and sometimes will stand by the door looking outside, which I take as her cue to let us know she needs to go out. Even so, every other day or so I'll find a big puddle somewhere in the house. Now I just pray she does it on the wood floor and not the rugs.

All of you with older doodles, does this get better??? Was your pup like this at 6 months? Is she just being naughty like a kid would be, or is she going to be uncontrollable forever? We had a golden retriever who was so much better behaved and I'm starting to feel like we have a dog who can learn, but just doesn't want to.
 

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I feel your pain in a couple of areas. One is the jumping up. Our Sadie knows the off command and will obey when she hears it, but she hears it because she has just jumped up on someone! I need a way to prevent that. We usually try and keep her tethered when someone comes to the door, but it would nice if she could just greet them with a sniff and wait nicely to be petted instead of jumping on them!

The other is the come command. This is when she is out for a pee break or out playing in the yard. Sometimes she will come, but most often she stands there with that cocked head doodle look as if to say "what did you just say?" and then proceed to go back to sniffing around or whatever she was doing. I have found the only way to consistently get her to come is to say the word "treat." Even then, I have been known to go get the milk bone box and stand at the door in my pyjamas shaking the box to get her to come in.

Sorry, I know you were looking for some answers on this post, but I just wanted you to know you are not alone! I will be reading the advice here with interest. By the way, Sadie is now one year old, so I'm not so sure she will "outgrow" these habits.
 

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jonah is almost 8 months and we have similar issues. when i first got him at 4 months, he wouldn't leave my side outside. now he pulls in the yard (on walks we use the gentle leader). He's been through puppy class and passed...kinda. :wink: we still have the jumping up issue. i hope someone has some answers. we are going to do intermediate training after the first of the year. does anyone have preference of individual verus group training?
 

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Ruby is 20 months old now. Altogether, she has had 3 weeks of training. She still jumps up on people, especially my grandkids. When I take her out in public with her pinch collar on with her leash, she is very well behaved. She will walk without pulling as long as I stop walking when she starts to pull. Ruby's last trainer recomended a shock collar, to get her to come and quit jumping up. This works great when she has her collar on. However, Doodles are so smart, I think too smart. Ruby knows when I get the shock collar out that I mean business, and behaves. She will also grab food off the table (usually my wifes and not mine), if given the oppertunity. She also digs in my yard. However we love Ruby and wouldn't trade her for anything. It's just an ongoing battle. I guess just like raising kids.

Russ
 

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They aren't dumb Doodles, they are rebellious, stubborn teenagers. Archie is in the same stage. I still maintain its a good thing they are so cute!
:lol:
 

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Thank you guys, It really helps to hear that other Doodles do the things that Denver does. When he is in training mode he does great but in seconds he forgets(or pretends to forget) and he is jumping up or chasing the cats and basically doing what ever he is not supposed to, but when you look in these dog's faces it is so hard not to just laugh and just melt. Do you guys agree that when they turn their heads that certain way that they know how adorable they are. This is a very smart breed, maybe too smart LOL

Blueteal
 

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Lizzie is 11 months old and was doing all the things you described. She knows all the basic commands and has no problem with them - except for come. She thinks "come" is a euphemism for playing chase. We live near a very busy highway & I'm having to use the shock collar for her own safety.

We had all the problems you described - jumping on people, going in the house, chewing, etc etc & found that 2 training sessions a day reinforced commands very nicely. The other thing is LOTS and LOTS of excercise!

A tired doodle is a goodoodle!

LizziesMom
 

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hahhaha Here i am reading everyone's stories wondering what I too may be in for as Max is almost 5mos old.
To-date i am lucky that he is a model child when he goes with me to friends or family's home.

I do notice however, if he gets bored ---watch out :shock: !!! everything he learned goes out the window. hahhahaha

I find daily training (and playtime) is the key --so far. I have 3 teenagers so to me Max is easier than them :wink:
why? max KNOWS how to pick up socks off the floor, max knows how to move furniture out of his way, wash floors, barks and answers the door when visitors come, and has a good sense of humor. need i say more?
 

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just a thought...consensus: DOODLES are too smart and outsmart when they see the opportunity :lol:
 

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I do think excercise is key - I just got back from swimming my dogs, so I can finish a paper Im writing :)

A good way to train them to stop jumping on people (especially kids) is to set up a correction scenario. Have the grandkids, or anyone, volunteer to come over & correct the dog everytime they jump. Lizzie stopped in about 3 days. She still quivers all over with excitment, but she knows its not acceptable to jump on people, especially little people.

This distraction method works too, almost every time. The more the better. We trained our dogs to down/stay around squirrels & ducks! Pretty cute really. Now if only Lizzie would come when I call her. . .

LizziesMom
 

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once again thanks jac!!

There is one thingI do with both dogs and horses: use a calm, soothing voice when training, giving much praise and constantly stroking them "saying good Max". A strong firm louder voice is for severe correction or to avoid dangerous situations/ mishaps ie: like swallowing a mediacation etc. I also use treats initially.

Funny but I tend to "talk" to animals like a person. Meaning, rather than try to think like a dog I think of our Max more as a 3-5yr old child. Max is going to steal socks and sort them but in the end he always drops that at me feet unharmed and I tell him "good boy". I have to work with him every day with our goal being : a well mannered pet/family member that is still going to act up form time to time ---as we all do.
 

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Otto has been to classes and was always good, but it is not the same inviroment as the real world. Otto always comes and does not leave our side UNTIL we try and put his leader on, then he runs away, but it is the same in the house, even when he knows he is going for a walk I have the same performance, until I go to the door and he thinks he is being left behind, it is one big game for him It is like chasies
 

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You are welcome!

It sounds like you all have a handle on this...your dogs are individuals and you know them better than anyone else...you will figure it out.

I have taught my dogs the word "settle!" Now, when they get barking or acting up...jumping around when excited...I just quietly stand there and softly say, "settle" and it is amazing that they do!

I taught them this by holding their collars when every other dog was jumping around (individual turns) and I would hold them there, saying "good settle" and I said the word settle many times, always quietly and gently and stroked them and talked softly. Soon the reason for the excitement was over and the dog learned that settle was to be quiet and to sit.

They still get excited, but will almost always settle when told to.
 

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good idea jac! i like that word "settle" and will try using that in the near future as it would go good with Hush. I have found using gentle approaches with a doodle works much better. when training.
it's almost like you Hurt a doodle's feelings if you are too firm.

did i fail to mention the only thing Max just starting doing is refusing to lie down when I do training with him? hhhaha we're working on it. :wink: he has hit the "trying 2's stage" hahahha and let me tell you he tries! :roll:

funny thing, my back lately has been hurting bad recently ( i smashed 4 disks4yrs ago go-cart racing lol)...anyway it seems when my back is really out he just started laying and leaning behind me in bed and wow it takes all the pressure off and I start to feel better. I am sure it's coincidence but my fiance wonders as he NEVER sleept next to us yet --he always sleeps at the end of the bed. hmm all i know is I never thought a dog could help my back :)
 

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My Daisy, now 16 weeks is becoming very hard for me to control. My sweet little submissive pup has decided she is dominant over me. She bites the leash and still bites me when we are playing. She bites my sleaves and does not let go. I have to pry her mouth open! She now can reach the kitchen counters and is constantly surfing for something. I am taking her to the local Pet smart for puppy kindergarten but I am not really getting any info on correcting bad behavior. She takes my husband seriously but not me. I can say "off", yell "off", scream "off" with no response. One sharp "off" from my husband and boom she is off. :roll:
I don't want this to spiral out of control. How do I regain control. What is an effective form of correction? Is this typical behavior that she will out grow? I am only 5 ft tall. I am worried that in a very short period of time she will really be able to over power me!

I don't believe she means any harm, she is very easy going and fun but alot like my 2 boys, a bit rambuncious!
 
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