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For the last month or so I have been reading up on labradoodles and I'm considering getting one as my first dog. I am single, live in a large apartment with one roommate and 2 cats. From what I've read, I'm not concerned about the cats, that seems ok but there is something that I'm worried about. How will my future doodle handle being home alone while I'm at work? I've asked friends how their dogs handle this and no one has thought it would be a problem as most people do work during the day and still have dogs. What about potty training though? Should I look into getting an adult dog vs. a puppy for this reason? [/i]
 

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Hello and welcome!

You are asking some good questions and I wish that there was an easy answer for you. But what I have discovered is that all dogs and puppies are different and what works for one doesn't always work for another.

You are right that potty training will be much more difficult if the pup is crated all day. And these dogs do need exercise, so if you are able to, it would be great to take your pup to a doggie day care a couple of times a week and/or see if a neighbor would come in and walk him or play ball with him for a while. You could also hire a dog walker.

An older dog might come with a different set of problems, especially if you get a rescue (since you won't know much about his life before you...) still, most doodles are really good dogs.

Even though they are generally great dogs, many back yard breeders or puppy mills are so careless in selecting parents that you can get some puppies with temperament issues.

Also, dogs will be dogs...and you will have to deal with messes, chewing, digging, etc. So, as long as you are fully prepared for the challenges as well as the pleasure, your puppy will adjust to your schedule and becoeme a loving pet.

Be sure that if you get a puppy, you enroll him into puppy kindergarten classes. They are so much fun for you and your puppy!

Here is a link about crate training and at the end of the article, it tells you how long you can leave a dog in a crate: http://www.inch.com/~dogs/cratetraining.html

I don't like to dwell on the negative issues, but I feel that it is very important to be realistic when you are making such a huge decision and as much as I adore my dogs, they DO have some negative traits. :wink: So if you are aware and prepared, you will be more able to deal with the issues as they arise.

Select your breeder well, because you will want to ask questions along the way and a good breeder will be there for you!
 

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Jac gives great advice!!!!

Getting an older and potty trained dog was right for us because we seriously do not have the time for the potty training. And looking at your personal situation it seems an older dog would be good for you too. I personally have never potty trained a dog before but from reading other peoples post it seems pups need to go out about every 45 minutes or so and if you arent home in the day then that could be a problem!

Their are lots of doodles all over looking for a new home. Jac is right as far as if you get a rescued dog you might not know what you are getting but doodles are very good dogs and I dont think you will run into problems. I've always had rescued dogs and cats and I think they make the best pets!
 

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I wish the world was ideal and you could get a dog and spend every minute of every day with it. with that being said I have had to work and sometimes crazy hours and I would have died without my dog! I got two dogs at 4 months of age and I think for me that was the perfect age... potty training was minimal, bonding was still perfect! I crated them during the day until they outgrew puppyhood and they earned my trust during the day! As a concession to day crating I allowed them to stay with me every moment I was home including sleeping in my room! I am not saying it would work with everyone, but crating your dog 20 hours in a day doesnt seem appropriate.

Of course my thought is a labradoodle is the perfect dog in any situation
but just make sure you have enough off work time to be a mommy to your new baby..... :) they seem to get a little put off if you come home from work change and then run out again!
 

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Thanks for the good advice, guys! And Jac, thank you for the crating link. That was very helpful. You are both right... I am realizing what a huge decision this is for both myself and the dog I choose.
I have other questions, too. :) From what I've read, doodles seem to be a quiet breed that don't often bark...does anyone know if this is true or does it just depend on the personality? One of the things I most want to do with a dog is take her jogging with me. Would a morning 1-2 mile jog and a walk at night be enough exercise (of course playing indoors together too)? If a pup's parents have both recieved a good bill of health and don't have hip problems, can I be confident the litter will also be free of hip problems as well?
 

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Thanks, Brooke. :D

Doodleallday, You have certainly done your homework and it appears as if you know exactly what you need to do to make this work...I really respect that.

About the barking...well, I wish I could say that they are quiet little angels...but I am afraid that many doodles are barkers. I personally have a barker...and I can't say what to look for because my girls are sisters and one barks and the other doesn't...so it is hard to say.

Mostly it is a training issue, but often doodles do bark at strangers coming to the house and sometimes they have been known to bark while the owners are gone.

I found an interesting thing online once, I don't know if it works or not, but I like the idea: http://www.caninelullabies.com/

This Amazon site has interesting reviews:
//www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00068RDMY/104-0028536-5637577?v=glance&n=5174

Now, about the health of your puppy...if you find a good breeder who tests for various genetic diseases (not just hips) and who selects the breeding dogs for good temperament and dispostion, you have a much better chance of getting a healthy dog. Still, you are dealing with nature and there are no promises. Diseases happen, even to the most cautious breeder's litters. What you get by selecting a good breeder is:

1) A breeder who cares enough to only breed healthy dogs (after testing)

2) A good health warranty

3) A breeder who will stand behind you and help you if possible

4) If your dog does get sick, the breeder will honor the warranty and refund part or all of your money so that you can use it to care for your dog...or they will take the dog back and either give you another dog or refund your money.

5) Your puppy will be well socialized and loved and will have spent time with it's mama and littermates, learning the lessons that only the canine family can teach.
 
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