Labradoodle Forums banner
1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
128 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
If we get a female dog will she keep Cody close to home? If she's spayed would she attract him as a female at all? We're trying to decide about getting a male or female for Cody's buddy. Cody stays right by the house but we're concerned that he'll roam in search of females when he gets older. Most of the time he's in the house. We live in the woods as you know - no fence possible. Buddy is still nowhere to be found. I'm afraid he's gone for good. I won't adopt a dog again - it's a puppy or nothing now. What do you think about a female? Oh - Cody is not neutered.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,243 Posts
Hi Angela...I am sorry that Buddy is still missing...very sorry.

In answer to your question...no, a female will not keep him from looking for other females if he is intact and there are females in heat that he can get the scent of. Dogs are not monogomous...unfortunately!

Is there a reason that you are keeping him intact? If you don't intend to breed him, it is much healthier for him to be neutered...it cuts the chances of cancer. It also will help him to be less interested in marking and other traits that most people find annoying...

What you might find, is that the female will run away with him...or a male dog would too. Dogs run in packs and when they take off, usually the others in the pack go along as well.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
128 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Yes - there is a reason...

The reason Cody is intact is testicle sypmathy from my husband. I am 100% ready to have him neutered but my DH just cannot do it. I said that was fine as long as Cody did not hump my leg, mark everything, roam off, etc. Once those traits start the jewels are gone!

I'm trying to move on past Buddy. I think that even roaming free he has to be happier than he was before because he clearly suffered from the treatment. I hope he comes home someday - he'll always have a home with us no matter what he encounters out there and needs as a result of it. I just don't see him returning. The weather is nice and the river is cool. He can find food in the river or other places. He was so happy to be running and free. Maybe he'll be ok.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,243 Posts
Angela, I am sure that Buddy will be fine...in fact, perhaps he has wandered into a campground and someone took him home...you never know. I hope so...but as you said, he will be happier. I didn't want to comment on that other place/breeder, but I really got sick thinking of what that poor baby has gone through. And now, he has tasted freedom...he is a smart breed and will learn how to get by.

I did have to laugh at your husband's sympathy! Men are so funny!!!

I have to warn you though, once the marking and wandering start, I don't think that neutering him will stop it. Chase, my Poodle stud, was the best, most adorable dog in the world...still is, but when I took him to the vet on Wednesday...he marked the wall!! I was mortified! (They were gracious, but still...)

He never started marking until his pups were born though, so maybe Cody won't get there. Maybe others can give some insight on that. I only have Chase to learn from and he is rather...unique! :wink:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
279 Posts
Angela: I am sad for you all about Buddy. I have had houseguests for the last few weeks and have only been able to check here erratically, but I've seen what you've gone through and my heart goes out to you all. I agree with Jac, that doodles are extremely resourceful and I imagine that Buddy will find a place.

I have just a couple of things to add to the comments of others here. I had an Old English Sheepdog, Bailey, who was not neutered for the same reason you mentioned about Cody. My husband (at the time) just couldn't handle the thought. The good news is that he never seemed to develop the marking or humping traits that you are concerned with. But then, he was never out and about, so he had no "experience," so to speak... So I never saw any negative effects on his behavior from being intact. HOWEVER, when he was seven years old he did develop an inflammation in a testicle and he was neutered at that time. Blessedly, it turned out not to be cancer, but I'm quite sure that the surgery was much harder on Bailey at that time, than it would have been when he was a puppy. George (one of our 10mo old doodles.) is neutered.

I also live in the country and we have no means of putting up a fence. But we live in an area where people raise sheep and chickens and dogs may be shot if found on someone else's property. We have had great luck with our underground electric fence, though. It has saved us tons of worry and the doodles have an enormous area that they can roam in, but no farther. The "shock" aspect of the fence is not pleasant to contemplate, so I tried it on myself before I let it touch my doods. It's extremely annoying and oddly repelling, but I would not say that it's painful. But everyone has to make their own informed decision about it. I just wanted to share wlth you what a godsend it has proven for us. It was easy to install, easy to train the doods to and relatively inexpensive (compared to a fence).

Once again, you have my sympathies about the heart rending experience you went through with Buddy. Blessings to you all.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,243 Posts
Really good advice, Lisa...I am thinking about an underground fence for the front part of our home...our back is fenced really well, but sometimes our dogs get out the front door and they take off! Can't have that!! Nosiree! So, I am glad to hear about the fence that you have and how much you like it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
128 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
thanks

Thanks for the good advice - I appreciate it. I thought about an underground fence but assumed it would be way too much $$$$ to do such a large area. Does anyone have a estimage for cost/foot and what's involved in installing it?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
689 Posts
There are some previous posts about the underground fences. My husband installed it himself and it was very reasonable and not difficult.
I cracked up at the term "testicle sympathy".

As for Buddy. I'm betting someone picked him up and fell in love!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
279 Posts
The underground fence will cost around $200 to do a big acreage if you do it yourself. It's a lot easier to install than you might think. In our case we just mowed really low all along where we were going to put the fence, then I bought those landscape staples that you stick into the ground to hold landscape cloth and such. I "stapled" the wire hard against the ground about every 3 feet. In a couple of weeks the sod had grown over it to cover. If it's an area you don't mow, you can just lay it on the ground and staple it down. For a few days you have to take your dood out on a leash and let them get used to the boundary. (The collar "beeps" as you get close to the boundary wire - before it delivers a correction.) Both my doods learned within about 3 days that they didn't want to go across the boundary.
If you go on the website (I thinks it's radiofence.com) you can find out everything you need to know.

Jac, they even have one that has no wires at all that might work for a smallish front yard. I even have two small transmitters in the house that keep the doods out of the kitty litter and other potential mischief. Anyhow, sorry to run on so, but I really like this thing and it has solved a multitude of issues for our us.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,243 Posts
Lisa I am very grateful for the information! Of course, we all worry about the shock of the collar, but when you say that you tried it and it didn't actually hurt...well, that was good.
Do you leave the collar on all the time then?
How does rain affect the fence line?
What if the collar malfunctions? (I once had a bark collar squirt citronella and wouldn't shut off! Poor Lexie was running under things and pawing at her nose and I realized what was happening, I put my hand over the spayer and took the collar off, but it terrified her...I felt so bad.
I never used a collar like that again...any chance of something bad happening?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
689 Posts
I've tried the collar as well----not on purpose I happened to have it my hand when I walked across the fence. I didn't hurt, just startled. My husband did the same thing but the collar was in his pocket! :lol:

He rented a trencher and laid the cable in the trench then covered it. Same thing about the grass growing over it. The dogs learn their boundries fairly quickly so if it malfunctions you might not know. We have the transmitter in the garage and I see the lights on it all the time. The other thing is being sure to check the batteries in the collar every so often.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
279 Posts
Jac- We have only had malfunctions when the collar DIDN'T work. Usually it was because of low batteries. You do have to be aware that the fence won't "work" if the power goes out or you have some kind of loss of signal. The website will fill you in on the signal loss thing...it's all about radio. So the transmitter can't be too close to a large metal object (like your car or a washing machine) and the wire has to make a complete loop. We've had no problem with rain affecting it - and here in the pacific NW we sure have the rain. Also, there is a switch that you change based on how much wire you use. We have ours on a medium setting for about 2 acres. The collar stays on whenever the doods are outside or in the house in our kitchen/family room area, but we take the collars off whenever we leave the house ("Doods! You want to go in the big red truck! Let's take off your collar!) or go to bed. You can also set the collar part to just beep or five other levels of "correction." The first level feels about like a tiny bit of static electricity, like when you take your laundry out of the dryer. The last level feels creepy and uncomfortable....I definitely would avoid it, given the choice. You also can change the "probe" part of the collar to long or short based on your dood's general fluffiness.

George would do anything to avoid the static correction, so his collar is set really low. But Grace has had to have her collar cranked up to the maximum. Every dog is different, so you start at a very low level and show them where the boundaries are and you can quickly see how responsive they are, so you don't have to set it any higher than need be.

I know the whole thing sounds kind of creepy, the static and all, but my doods are safe at home and I don't think either of them has had to experience the little shock for a while. It's amazing how fast they learn.

Once again, sorry to be so drawn out....we have found this tool to be a life saver since we can't fence.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,243 Posts
Thank you guys...I agree, the static is not something I want to do, but if it keeps my dogs home and not in the street or wandering the mountainside, it would be worth it.
My problem is that I'd need the wire "fence" to go over my driveway and you say it can't be near a car...any thoughts on that?
And, what about when the dog does actually blow through the fence...do they get a shock coming back? (Say it was a fast decision to turn around and come back and I didn't have time or know about it...to turn the thing off.)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
689 Posts
Our transmitter is in the garage and we too cross our driveway. We've had no problems at all. We fit the wire between the edge of the driveway which as asphalt and the street curb which is cement.
As far as once they break through---yep, they would get shocked coming back. Chester has only done that once...he was just way too tempted by the Golden across the street (naturally the street). He's learned and now he won't cross at all. When we take him for a walk we always use the same area to leave the yard---kind of a magic door. If we try and take him out anywhere else he won't go...even if we call him.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Jac, I think I posted this on another board, but the fence I got for our doodle is a wireless fence. Its called the Petsafe Wireless Pet Fence. You just plug the reciever in and you can adjust the perimeter with the dial on the reciever to suit your yard (one reciever covers over 1/2 an acre). It will work over concrete or anything else. I have it plugged in the house and the dog is free to roam all around the yard, front and back. It took maybe a whole 45 minutes to get it working and the dog trained. It beeps once they get close enough to be shocked as a warning (and you can adjust the shock or just have the beep) and unlike the wire underground fences, the wireless one will continue to shock until the dog gets back into the perimeter. It retails for about $260, but I got mine off of ebay for $220. It works great and is portable.

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...9314-6495044?_encoding=UTF8&v=glance&n=284507
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,243 Posts
Thanks! I like the options on that...lots of choices...sounds like it works as well as the underground, but easier to set up and to take with you if you move! :wink:
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
Top