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OK, I am truly about to cry. I don't know if I can deal with it all anymore. My labradoodle is 20 months old, neutered, smart and very hard to enjoy for anyone in my family.

I know dogs, like people, are going to have some quirks. No one is perfect. Unfortunately, my dog has several problems that make him hard to live with. Let me begin by saying we read several books and this website, as well as watching the Dog Whisperer to educate ourselves before getting our dog. We went with a breeder who did temperament testing, and we had early pick in the litter. He was neutered early, began obedience school at about 11 weeks, and we have had a trainer come to our house for one-on-ones 8 times. We crate trained him and followed everything by the book, no walks in public until the shots, no long runs until the hips were developed, reputable food with some some raw fruits and vegetables as well, he had barely any accidents in the house because we always took him out before, in the middle and after play, didn't feed him after 6:00, etc. Trained him how to use the bells as well to go out. You name it, I have to say, we knew the importance of it. I am telling you all this to let you know that it isn't a lack of knowing what to do here. Of course we are looking for suggestions and realize there are things we probably haven't tried, but just wanted you to know he isn't the way he is because we were clueless! Now, here is what we are dealing with. Our dog:

-Dribbles urine with excitement (not submission) anytime someone comes to the door. Have to be sure he is taken out before letting him greet them. Big hassle. We have three kids and friends coming and going all of the time like a revolving door. If you forget yourself and let someone in before dealing with our dog first, you get pee-hopefully not on their feet. (Hope it isn't raining out, then you have to decide whether to run to let in the guest and get them out of the rain, or figure out where the dog is! ) Even if he has a pretty empty bladder he often still dribbles. He quickly licks his privates so he knows he did it and shouldn't have (as I never see him lick when actually urinating outside). We never scold him because we think it would make it worse since it is unconscious, not deliberate. He never soils inside otherwise. After he licks himself quickly, he wants to jump all over them! Knows he shouldn't. We bring him to the door with the leash on and make him sit when the guest comes in and he tries really, really hard, but then ultimately bursts and jumps. (That is when the piddle comes.) Trainer said he won't pee if he is sitting, just can't get him to sit for long! Only way is by stepping on the leash.

-Steals everything from toliet paper off of the roll, paper towels off of the table, erasers, pen caps, little toys from the kids, everything. He has toys, Kongs, bully sticks, but wants the attention he gets from stealing. Knows it is "wrong." Likes to rip the paper into little shreds. He gets lots of attention. My husband and I are home all day. We let him sit and watch TV with us in the evening, take him with us on errands (not always, but several times a week), etc. If anything he gets too much attention! Have used a pager on his neck to "page"him (it vibrates) when we see him jump on the table.

-Is so hyper even after an hour walk. Comes in and looks for a ball to bring to me!!!! Charges at my elderly parents when they come in. Knows again, that he shouldn't. If you say "off" he gets off immediately and sits --then looks up at you, but darn it he just can't stay in that position if he is excited. Also, knowing doesn't stop him from doing it. He gets off when told by why can't he remember not to do it to begin with? Can stay in a "stay" for over two minutes otherwise, but no control when excited about something. (And lots excites him!) Earns treats for good behavior.

-Barks at dogs, people, stops signs waving in the wind, you name it.

-When I said, "Night, Night" and he went into his crate, I was so proud I got down on all fours and went to pet him and said, "Good boy! " and guess I kind of put my head in his crate the tiniest bit just to get to his head. Well, he snapped at me a bit. I yelled, "NO!" and closed the crate door, turned off the lights and went to bed.

-Growled at my husband one morning when my husband went to open his crate when he was asleep. Must have startled him?

-If I need to get him away from a situation (once it was broken glass) and pull gently on his collar while saying "here" he will open his mouth and turn his head to try to get my hand off of him. He doesn't actually bite, but he does try to use his teeth.

-Growled at my daughter who is older, when she was simply gently petting him (my husband was in the room and confirms that was all she was doing). Was told "NO!" by my husband and he and my daughter left the room.

-Tries to put the hand of anyone who pets him in his mouth and will try to put the arms of some individuals in his mouth. Trainer said to spray his mouth with Binaca since it wouldn't hurt him but would be a strong taste and would deter him. Works only when he sees the Binaca in your hand!

-For everytime I said he has growled at someone or snapped, there are a thousand times he acted the way he should. He let's the kids take toys or stolen items like paper towels, out of his mouth, let's them hug him gently, takes away his food bowl when he is eating (started training him with those things with the kids early on), etc. without problem. So, inconsistent I guess.

-Doesn't want to be out in the yard for long without us. Comes to the door and cries if we try to put him outside for some fresh air.

-Gets very excited when he sees two people in our family hug or kiss. Jumps up and down and tries to "get in on it." (We say, "No!" in a stern voice and turn our backs.)

He is loving, but honestly, conducts himself in a way that makes people afraid to pet him because he seems like he is going to bite them (although he doesn't) and have had close family members say he seems like he has a screw loose! He is just too intense and high strung. It is sad because he LOVES people, but no but us likes him because he is too, too much. Even if we have him restrained with a leash that we are stepping on so he can't jump, his head is going back and forth and he cries and whimpers to get their affection. It is really sad!

Some of this may not seem too bad, but when you add it all together it has us constantly on edge with him. My kids don't want him out when they are home alone because they don't want to be responsible for the trouble he gets into. They beg me to put him in the crate if I am running a quick errand and leaving them at home. We could take a few of these things, but it is too much! He can't even come upstairs because of the dribbling (that is where the carpet is.) When I was a child I had a black lab who did NONE of the above. My dad took her to a few sessions of dog training at the park district and that was it. Awesome dog. I never envisioned it would be like this.


HELP HELP HELP HELP HELP HELP!!!

Thank you for reading all of this! Sorry so long.
 

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Well, this is certainly not my area of expertise--hopefully others have better experience. My dog Dakota, is also a jumper. I have not tried hard enough to correct this which is something I must do. The thoughts I had when reading you post:
Have you considered sending your dog to "doggie boot camp?" It is an intense training program that you send ypur dog away to attend. Last a week or more.
Or, have you considered harnessing your dog's excess energy by getting him involved in a sport like agility, flyball or dock diving? That may be a fun idea for the kids to get involved with, too!
 

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Yikes, I feel how frustrated you are and I wish there were some magic words but............
You are dealing with a lot and sounds like you have done
many things very well. I agree that because his energy level
is so high that maybe he needs more ways to work out his energy, Could he go to doggie daycare? Or literally start all over again with training a pain I know but he may have missed something and will at least get some
reinforcement. When people come to your door does he have a place that you can send him to until he calms down a bit like his crate maybe?
Then once the company is settled you can introduce him on leash if he
seems quiter and if not then back to the crate. Maybe guests can get down to his level with a treat and then he willl not have a reason to jump!!! Can you have your vet rule out any problems, like pain somewhere and that is why he bares his teeth at certain times. To have the trainer come and work with him 8 times, what were the problems then and are they still the same ones.
Oh I wish I could help as I know that you have tried so many things, just
thinking out loud in case something triggers a new idea.
I will keep trying to think of something else and in the meantime maybe
some others can figure it out. :wink: :wink:
 

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Wow I don't even know where to start here. Since he was early neutered you might talk to your Vet about Hormone meds it might be he needs some to level off. I know I didn't word that right but being a breeder I've talked to my Vet in great length about early spay/neuter and he says sometimes dogs when early spay/neuter need the meds this helps with the peeing. Hey it won't hurt to ask anyway.

As far as his obedience I believe boot camp style at this point is what he needs. You may have to start with the basics with him and reinforce everything, but the trainer should be able to tell you this. Get a trainer that will guarantee the results and if he slips back they will work with him at any point again for free. Your Vet may be able to help find someone for you.

I don't know where you purchased him and don't want you to mention that here, but I do wonder if he may have some field trial lab in his bloodline. Field Trial Labs are bred to have high energy to the point of being hyper and usually are hard for the average family to handle but are usually very smart. He sure sounds like that to me. Some breeders won't mention this to you and if you are not familar with the pedigrees it is hard for the buyer to tell.

Keep us posted if you choose the different style of training and good luck to you and your family. He does sound like a wonderful dog.
 

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There is a goldendoodle at the daycare where Tanner goes who sounds very similar. He never stops........He goes there everyday now and they are working with him...slow progress so far.

I agree with the doggy bootcamp. It sounds like you have tried everything, I think it is time to consider a professional trainer and I think one where he would be boarded. We have one here whre the dogs go for 1 month of training before they include the family....

Good luck....

:cry: :cry:
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thank you so much for taking the time to read my novel (!) and to give our problem some careful consideration. I will begin looking into Boot Camp. It would be hard for me because I'm a bit overprotective and I would worry a little about what it is they are doing to make those dogs do such a 360, but I know I would have to have faith in the place I chose.

Wally is a 6th generation doodle. Linda, I will ask if there could be Field Trial Lab in him. Sure would make sense. He is so smart.

Diane, I will also look into the agility activities, the kids would think that is fun! Have tried the treadmill. He hated it. LOVES to chase after a ball in the field and does love to jump into the air for things. He isn't big (28 pounds) so he gets some serious air time!

Sue-He does go to his crate when visitors come on occasion. I really like the treat idea. Maybe if they only give him a treat if he is calm and sitting he will catch on eventually! The trainer that came to the house worked on the basics, which he can perform when asked. She is the one who turned us onto the Binaca spray for mouthiness, the pager for jumping, etc. It is mostly his impulsiveness, hyperactivity and unwillingness to stop himself from doing the things he shouldn't that is our problem. Maybe Boot Camp can make the difference.


You have no idea how much your support means. Just to have your empathy gave me momentary strength! Your ideas are so helpful. Keep them coming! Thank you!!
 

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I am so sorry about your frustration. I have written for advice on this forum many times...in tears...for many of the same problems you are experiencing- -Except I was NOT an experienced dog owner and I had no idea what I was getting in to....Here are a few things I learned....

Calvin is a power chewer and will EAT ANYTHING!!! He is famous for the bathroom trash. As a result, he is not allowed in any room that has a door. I close all the doors which leaves him the living room, kitchen and family room. That's where we are all hanging out anyway, so no biggie. BUT when my kids leave the door open or not completely closed..You can bet Calvin is in there chewing on toothpaste lids or tissue. I expect he knows better since I always tell him "NO" and shoo him out, but he keeps doing it. I think of him like a 2 year old...I have to 'child proof' my house. His toys are the only things on the floor. At this point, I feel like it is our fault if he gets into stuff. He is young and I expect he will 'grow out if it" in a year or so....

He used to mouth us and want to wrestle with us, but it was inappropriate since he outweighs my 8 year old and-even though he is playing- it often hurts. I never really figured out a way to stop this. Bitter spray did not work. I just told him "NO" and put him outside every time. Sometimes that would be a very frustrating, constant rotation...I guess he grew out of that too, 'cause he does not do that anymore.

He was never a jumper, thank goodness. BUT his sister is. We acquired her about a year after we got him and she had no training. She would jump on me and the kids in excitement. It seemed to get her some attention so Calvin thought it might work for him and he stated to jump too. Unacceptable. I have been working on this for several months and it is getting better. When someone comes to the door, they have to go outside until I let them come greet. I let them in one at a time and hold their collars so they can't jump up. I ask my guests to get down to their level so they do not feel the need to jump. I praise calm behaviors. They are getting better.

Time will be your friend. Your dog will mature and "mellow out". Be consistant. If you need a time out, put the dog outside. Try not to use the crate as punishment.

Hang in there...I'm sure your dog will be a terrific member of the family soon....Good Luck!

Leslie
 

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I'm doing some research because we are getting our first dog ( a labradoodle!) and I went to the library last night and came home with "The Dog Listener" by Jan Fennell. She has trained dogs based on Monty Roberts' (author of "The Man Who Listens to Horses") technique and I was up half the night reading it. Fascinating. . .got up early to continue.

She studied the society of the pack, which would be the dog's way of living in the wild. She uses a communication technique called Amichien Bonding. It is her belief that some of the dog problems that many have are rooted in their (the dog's) belief that they (not their humans) are the leaders of their "packs." Lots of their "mis-behavior" is really based on the dog acting like the leader of the pack and if someone does something that feeds this belief or, in his eyes, contests his position in the pack, he will act accordingly.

Again, I am new at this and there may be others that know much more than I do about this training mode, but I found the book to be easy to read and understand.

Good luck!

Sandy
 
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Anns5, wow I am so sorry for the tough time you have had with your dog.
First, I want to give you some reassurance that some dogs are 'puppyish' longer than others and I truly believe that much of what you are describing is exuberant puppy behavior. That said, I think you will see an incredible improvement at 24 to 30 months of age. Bella calmed down considerably at 15 months, some dogs just mature later.
Now, you say a trainer said the urine dribbling would be resolved if he could just go into a long down/stay. That would be awesome. So what I am going to suggest is controversial, but used properly with a trainer who is specifically trained in their use, I strongly believe they are a wonderful tool:
We trained Bella using an E-collar (electronic collar). It is the best thing I have done for my sanity and for the sanity of our entire home. It is not an inhumane method when used properly. Here are some links recommending them (And just so you know, for every link with positive remarks, there is another link telling horror stories.) Our results have been incredibly positive and I now have a dog who goes to her place and lays down when the doorbell rings (and believe me she was exactly like your description of your dog when people would come over.) I have tested the strength of the correction and it feels like a TENS unit, it is a distinct signal that the dog understands immediately. It does not hurt.
Good luck and please come here to vent anytime! We understand your frustration and want to help.

http://www.thepetcenter.com/gen/training1.htm

http://www.workingdogs.com/articles_train.htm

I don't know where you are located but this is the trainer I used. If you read her testimonials, you will see the difference this training makes. I am sure she has many more stories that are not posted, the letter I sent thanking her is not on her website.
http://www.k9miracles.com/index.htm

Here is a list of certified trainers:
http://www.canineworld.com/directory/se ... ollar.html

Here is another list of certified trainers:
http://www.sitmeanssit.com/nl-grads/

Or you could try and google "certified remote collar trainer NJ" Or whatever state you live in.

Best of luck!
 

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Anns5....I can see how you may feel frustrated and/or overwhelmed, as you have alot going on with a exhuberant 20mo old doodle puppy.

I can't really think of much else besides you can hire a private trainer working one on one or the doggy boot camp.

the other thing too is can he sense you are afraid of him biting and growling? if so, you have to figure out a way to be the pack leader/alpha after you work with a trainer or do doggy boot camp.

Hang in there , get some help as it could change things tremendously where you and your family will start to enjoy your doodle MORE again and let us know how you do....oh NICE to meet you too :D
 

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Frustrated by young labradoodle

Hello I am new to your discussion group - and had to say something in reply to the frustrated owner of a labradoodle.
I am the proud owner of a dog that is classified as a rescue. The owner wrote a letter almost identical to the one you wrote. I got her "difficult" dog.
The dog - bonnie - would have been put down if I had not intervened and took her home to my really high energy labradoodle Fergus.
Bonnie is an angel. Fergus is crazy, tears up paper towel, runs around in circles after walks, pulls on his leash, and I adore him.

What is different is my perception. I never expected my dogs to be programmable into little robots that are the symbol of perfect dogs. Instead I rejoice in the humor of it all, and am so thankful to god that they are not perfect. Because it reminds me that I need to lighten up sometimes. So what if they tear up paper? I'm sorry to be harsh but I think you expect too much from your dog.

What do you suppose your dogs letter would look like if he wrote one about you? How you never take time to play with him everyday? How you yell at him? How you try to use one size fits all approaches to training instead of getting to know him? Fergus jumps up.. so he can kiss my face. I don't care one bit what other people think about that. I love the kisses. He runs off with paper towel and tears it up.. to get me to play with him. And what do I do..? I clean it up. I clean it up and laugh. What a happy soul my boy is.

He vocalizes a lot, but I work with that. One thing about training is that IT NEVER STOPS. You don't take the dog to a school or try a trick you saw on some TV show and expect that it will fix anything. You have to change you. You have to work with your dog everyday. If you are not prepared to do that you should not have a dog. The condition that Bonnie was in when I got her, is likely the condition your dog will be in very soon. She pees everywhere as a result of the bad "training" she got. So guess what I did? I got a good mop and a steam cleaner.

Her previous owner wrote a note on the internet that is so close to what you are writing, I am wondering if you aren't the same person! I LOVE THIS DOG. I really love her. I love that she is imperfect.. just like me, and all the other people I love. Otherwise I would buy a robot.

My father used to say, never cry for something that wouldn't cry for you. No carpet is going to cry if I die. No floor is going to miss me if I'm not here. But you better believe my 2 dogs would risk their life for me in a heartbeat.
They might pee on the rug as they do it.. but really who cares.

So I have to do some extra cleaning... the face kisses are worth a million to me any day. I see the positive brilliant little clowns that live with me and say thank you to every god that might hear me. My dogs want to make me laugh.. I get it. So we live in peace.
Dogs are here to teach us lessons. Maybe you should ask what lesson you need to learn. Is it patience? is it to slow down? is it to see the good instead of the bad?
One thing I like about Caesar Milan is the emphasis on exercise. My babies get lots. Not just put in the yard, but running at leash free parks, walks with tons of pulling, lunging and barking.. but I keep going. I made a commitment, and know it's not about obedient dogs that could be in shows, it's about the better me that emerged when these two angels came into my life.
Thank you Fergus - Thank you Bonnie for accepting me with all my faults.
 

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SJS:
Let me say that it is great that you rescued someone else's dog that
they basically gave up on. But the person that started this post has not given up and is asking for help. So before we rag on someone that is
asking for help, let us try without prejudice to help them. :wink: :wink: :wink:

And by the way
Welcome to Doodleland to the both of you!!!
 
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Anns5, there is another item that could make your life a little better while you are deciding how to proceed with training. It's called a belly band! I have heard really good things about them, but have not actually used one (I think they are for boy dogs :lol: ) Anyway, it may not help in 'training', but you won't have to worry about pee on carpet or pant legs or shoes when he has one on:
http://www.dog-breeds.net/dog_diaper_belly_band.htm
 

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Thank you Fergus - Thank you Bonnie for accepting me with all my faults.
I imagine that there are all sorts of philosophies about pet ownership. I am unapologetically of the school that the animal needs to adjust to the family it lives in, and be a companion, not rule the roost. It sounds as though Anns5's doodle is really dominating the emotional and physical climate of the whole family. What especially concerns me is the snapping and biting. That's never acceptable and is a danger sign.

We had a very dominant dog who ended up biting our granddaughter. She was a two-year-old child who dropped a pencil, reached down to get it, and Pippa, who was under the table, nipped her, drawing blood. Thank heavens it was a small nip and not on her face where she would have been especially vulnerable. We had trainers in before she bit, but I don't think they were specialized enough and they didn't make a difference. After she bit we gave her to a rescue organization. I was surprised that they felt they had a home for her.

Possibly if we had found a trainer who focused on this sort of behavior we would have been able to keep her, but I'm not positive. I had never had an animal who behaved like that in all my years of owning dogs; she was constantly testing us to see who was in charge. We could never be off-guard with her. She was not a good companion and that's what I want from my dogs.

Your doodle doesn't sound like Pippa, but it does sound as though you need professional help, and from someone who is better qualified than the run-of-the-mill self-taught person who likes animals. The links that Linda gave you look very much to the point. You are doing everything you can to address the situation and now you need some extra assistance.

One thing I found that seems promising for my four-month-old puppy is to ask people to make her sit before they pat her or talk to her. She's already starting to pick up on that, and it definitely addresses the jumping behavior. Something to try while you're doing a trainer search.

Lot of luck and keep posting!

Leslie
 

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I'd suggest having the vet look your dog over carefully for any pain or illness, then if he is healthy, work on his behavior because biting and growling at the family is a problem.

I agree with Linda, hormones could help the piddling, but I'd ask the vet to check him over carefully for problems in this area.

Check with your breeder, they may have some insight and hope for you.
 
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Sometimes our posts don't come out the way we want them to. I re- read my advice and want to make sure you know that I am in no way trying to diminish the issues you are having by saying your dog will grow out of them. I just don't want you to lose hope and think that he will be like this forever, because I can definitely tell you that he won't! :lol:

You certainly have done alot of research and planning. I remember being very sad and depressed when Bella was a wild puppy, so I know where you are coming from. I wanted a sweet, cuddly, calm dog and got a wild, often out of control puppy. I also took her to puppy preschool training. She was an angel at classes and still wild at home :roll: . She growled at my 5 year old who was only petting her. I was right there and saw it happen. The trainer showed me how to do a correction with the leash, she growled once more at him, I corrected her, she never did it again. She is still a 'mouthy' dog. She really is just using her mouth to get something she wants, like 'play with me', or to signal 'let me out'. In the morning instead of licking, she very gently 'mouths' my hands. I am amazed at how gentle her mouth is and it makes her happy, so I just put up with it. :roll: It's not acceptable, but I have figured out WHY she does it. I'm sure my trainers would be apppalled :lol: Bella still tries to get in the middle of a hug or kiss. The 'Down' command or 'place' command works for these situations.
I see the big things as the growling and snapping. Unacceptable and you will have to do the correction that a trainer can show you if it happens again.
Being in the back yard alone is not enough stimulation for him since he is a dog who is craving human contact all the time. If you can gve him some mental exercises, that could help with this issue. Maybe hide some treats around the yard and have him find them? Buster cubes are good toys for some mental stimulation. Also, he might just need a 'job.' Teach him to get the newspaper, carry in the junk mail from the mailbox, find a specific toy, etc.
Someone on the forum mentioned saying thank you when their dog barked to let him know you could handle the 'issue' that he is barking at. This has worked well with Bella. I say, "Thank you, hush" and she settles back down. I do think that he thinks his job is to protect you.
With the jumping on your elderly parents, there is a safety issue. If you can enlist some helpers, training will be easier. Send him to 'place' (a bathroom rug where he can still see all the action at the front door works well...that way 'place' can be portable) Ring the doorbell and keep him in 'place'. When he can do that consistently, add people coming in the door. When he can do that, add big hugs and high voices. That probably is his big trigger with your parents. VERY HARD for a dog to resist those hugs and high picthed welcomes, especially one that loves people. Be patient and repeat over and over again. (and the ecollar helps immensely with this.)
I'm going to tell you what my first trainer told me when I was at my wits end and ready to give her back to the rescue agency where we got her:
He is a great dog. Be patient and keep doing the training. he is a great dog, just give him time. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Thank you to those of you who are so supportive and have given me such wonderful ideas. I intend to look into all of your suggestions. I feel empowered by your empathy and willingness to reach out as well.

SJS-I was surprised that my email was so misunderstood. You really made a lot of presumptions. Perhaps you should have reread my post before responding --you missed a lot. In addition, you might have begun by asking questions and then commenting. I am in fact not the person you rescued your dog from (why would I still be posting about a dog I don't own anymore???) but I do believe you have made me this person in your own mind and have taken your anger with him out on me. I specifically said that I don't scold my dog when he pees, that we know it is not deliberate, and he does not in fact, soil anywhere else. I said I take him for hour walks, on errands, and began my post with the fact that I don't expect him to be perfect, that we all have quirks. I think it is great that you rescued your dog and that you love both of the dogs you own, but I would rethink the idea that letting them do anything that they want is the way to show acceptance and love. It is my humble opinion that this might not be the best tactic with dogs or children, for their own good. I would rethink allowing him to steal things and just laughing about it. My friend's dog ate a marble and had to have surgery to have it removed because it blocked a part of his intestine. Dogs should not eat pieces of paper towels, toys or the like. It isn't good for them and we frankly worry more about his well being rather than the item. I also don't believe it is ok for a dog to jump on anyone and just not worry about what they think. Some people have a real fear of dogs and it can cause them angst. Many have allergies or in my father's case, a back problem that can be aggravated by a dog jumping on him. People have rights. My dog has also inadvertently peed on two different people's feet with exuberance. That is not, no matter what you believe, acceptable under the pretense that my dog is a happy soul. Dogs, like children, need boundaries to feel secure. Did you know that if you let your dog feel like he is the Alpha dog in your home indefinitely that it can actually be stressful for him? He thinks he is the leader. That can be a heavy role! Then he feels like it is up to him to survive.

I know you are new to the boards. I actually am not. I have been reading them since 2005. What you may not know is that these boards are run by, read by and responded to by some of the most intelligent, kind, supportive people you'll ever meet. They don't judge one another, they are positive. It is like a family. We are all here because we love our dogs and want the best for them and our own families. It is the recognition that the dogs aren't perfect and neither are we that is one of the many reasons a forum like this is needed.

That empathy, acceptance and patience you have for your dogs... it goes a long way with humans too.

( We all know dogs are the epitome of unconditional love. With that in mind I have to say, I think your dogs might be a bit ashamed of the way you responded to me. But like a dog, I'm over it already!)

Best of luck to you SJS.
 

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OK..i got to thinking and i am far from an expert ...but over the years of fostering rescue and stray dogs, I have worked with Private trainers in the past. They really do help.

NOW a dog is just that a dog....meaning they are going to Bark if they even hear a chipmunk fart outside. They will steal a sock or shoe for the "chase" you going NO give it back, and the dog going: OH boy she's going to play with me now" :wink: I think Max barks at CASPER the friendly ghost, i know when UPS is delivering pkgs on my road too. :wink:
I found my "baby talk" when max was younger would cause "piddling" on the rug. He did outgrow it and i can do babytalk now. Peanut once tried to bite my son when he thought she had something that would harm here and it was a bone. We ended that one right then and there as she was 3mos old,
NOW with a bigger older dog sometime size and age can make people fearful, hence we find ourself at crossroads. to me a 20mo old doodle is like having a teeange girl at age 14-17yrs and a boy at age 16-18yrs old.....trouble hahhahaha stubborn hahahhaa mouthy hahhahaa funny sometimes and almost to the point of needing RETRAINING as they are feeling "their oats" and need reinforcement to their "status" in your home.

Anns5....hang in there, take one day a time....you can starting with ONE ISSUE and work just one thing at a time. It may be hard but perserverance and patience with tons of praise goes a long way.
Repetition is key. When you accomplish one thing then move the next and so on. IN your case though a Private Trainer would be able to ensure more success as they have more expertise and have insight to something we don't.

mine are far from being well trained, they know sit, stay, settle, okay, HUSH, "knock it off", clapping hands means stop too, they also know the difference between my stuff and theirs ( peanut still thinks my socks are hers :roll: )..........but i had to do this daily and even now if they are left just to play and it's awhile since i've done training they get out of hand here.There is ONE THING THOUGH i love my doodles to no end but I am the BOSS, I am the rule maker , I am Alpha, I am the pack leader and once they know that training becomes easier.
MAX at 8mos old went to obedience training and OMG he was horrible the 1st night....i gave about 40 people the best laugh of their life!
and knwo what i got? EXTRA homework hahahahaa for one week solid I worked with MAX , he bucked like a bronco one night so much I SAT on him (lightly) hahhahahhaa I held on and once he calmed down , i started the training all over again praising him just for being calm this time.
6 nights later he was a "cream puff" and could also do a 1/2 laydown beside me.

wow long winded here hahahhaa......LONG story short, I had to retrain Max in obedience to their way and it took some time. what did i gain?
a better relationship with him of respect and more. I was the SOLE trainer in the house and much later then showed my kids and DAVE to do the same ...Max learned the "rules" from everyone and if we all stuck to the same training etc we got better results with a happier doodle.

Anns5 I really do feel for you, one note though, when Peanut and max are in their crate i never stick my hand or head in there, that is "their space" their comfort zone den and thus i give them respect. its rare they go in there on their own during the day but if they do I know they want some time alone :wink: hahahahaaaa and take full advantage of it to with a cup of coffee :wink:

so take it one day at a time, hang in there, choose one thing and work on it, going to the next when your doodle let's say knows "SIT" or Stay" etc.
I know when my teenagers had friends coming and going like a revolving door at a Macy's white sale....well sometimes i crated them for a few minutes , then i trained them with the "regular" friends one by one Max learned to stay calm,not bark and i also got the teenagers to take them out and play with max and peanut too. HELL they caused them to get overexcited hahahhahaaaaaaa and the teenagers learned to calm down too :wink:

You'll do great Anns5...just give it time, find a sense of humor as you'll need it , and come here for support honey. AND TILL someone has walked a MILE in YOUR SHOES either hand them your dog OR walk away from them. YOU need POSTIVE people and suport right now as it does help with success. All good things come in due time ..........(((((((anns5)))))
AND once again WELCOME to this forum...where you end up in TEARS of LAUGHTER :wink: :D
 

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After seeing your post that he is a 6th generation I don't feel Field Trial would be the cause of the high energy this is usually in the 1st or 2nd generation dogs since there still is a lot of Lab in them. 6th generation I would think most of the Lab has been bred out, or at least all that energy level. I could be wrong I'm no expert on genetics. :?

I understand how you feel about knowing what they are doing to your dog, I wouldn't want anyone being mean to mine just to make them mind. I think most professional trainers might use some measure but I don't think they would be mean or actually hurt an animal. Just get references if you choose one but like I said get one that guarantees their training program so if he slips back you can do a refresher for free for his lifrtime. You may pay more in the beginning but I feel it would be worth the extra.
 
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