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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Our Lucy doodle is close to 4 months old, and a lot of fun. For the past 5 or 6 nights however, she has been keeping my wife (and thus me) from sleeping. The moment I put her in the crate at night, she starts barking. Normally this will stop after 10 minutes or so (last night it seemed to last all night). Almost every hour she will start barking again, sometimes for 5 minutes, sometimes for 30. Initially, I thought the barks were to let her out, so I would take her outside, and try to get her to potty, and then put her back in the crate. She would go potty maybe 1 out of every 4 times. Either way, an hour later she starts barking again! This was the pattern for many times a night. Well, we decided maybe she was just barking because it meant she got to go out........ So we tried to ignore her barks (basically stay awake all night and listen to her bark) and she pooped on herself 2 nights in a row and did a fine job at making some in-crate wall paintings with it. Ack!!!! I am out of ideas and need some help to keep Lucy quiet during the night. Our house is not big, so moving her to a different part of the house doesn't help. You can see our sweet noisemaker playing with her best buddy at
www.flickr.com/photos/jamesandkristin

James
 

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hi nice to meet you and sorry to hear of your Lucy dilemna.

our Max did the same thing when young. we ended up letting him sleep in our room. now with Peanut we put her crate in our bedroom and she slept like a log. don't know if this helps.

also i never took peanut out of her crate when she barked. She got to come out when she settled down.
 

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I know you siad moving the crate around isnt an option, but we had to have it in our bedroom for Hershey to sleep through the night. She just wanted to be part of the pack.
 
G

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Hi James!
We were all wondering how things were going with gorgeous Lucy!
I would definitely try again with the whole 'ignore the barking episodes.' But first try to get her on a schedule for going 'poop.' Is it possible she had some extra treats, or new treats or some people food before those 2 nights? She may have been trying to alert you that she just felt lousy, but in doing so has created the barking habit because it gets interaction with you. Once she goes poop in the afternnon, she really should not have to go again that night, so if you can get her on a routine like that it wuld help because you could ignore the barking without the risk of an accident. The best way to get Bella to 'go' is a long walk in the evening. Try it and see if it helps. Plus it will tire her out enough to make her sleep longer than 1 hour.
And if she is not really liking her crate too much, I would try gating her in the kitchen for a few nights and see if it is better. That worked wonders for Bella. She loved the freedom of moving from her bed to the cool tile and back again.
What food is she on? A food with lot's of filler means lot's more pooping, too.
Keep us posted!
 

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Hi James, welcome to the forum. The others have given you good advice and I must agree that taking her out when she is barking will make her worse and not better. It sounds like she is becoming the Alpha and knows it, I would let her know that she is not or things could get worse. :roll:
 

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Hi, welcome!
You have been given some great suggestions...and I agree with them all.
First you want to be sure that the pooping is not being caused by parasites or something...if she can't control her pooping, she may have a physical reason, so get her checked by the vet and tell the vet what happened.
Once you know she is healthy, consider the temperature where you have her sleeping. Our dogs love to be cool! No, they love to be cold! All winter long, they prefer sleeping either on the deck (we have a doggie door to our bedroom) or with their nose out the door. They always want to be by a door with a space so air can come in. So make sure she isn't too hot.
I always put our pups in our room. They are lonely, afraid and want attention. You could try to get a snuggle puppy for her, that might help with loneliness.
Also, we always cover their crate at night. This seems to make it more of a den and they quiet down. They don't feel so trapped.
Here is a good site for crate training:
http://www.inch.com/~dogs/cratetraining.html
 

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Tanner fussed in the crate and then let us know by jumping on the bed that he would like to sleep with us. We tried it and it was great....as he grew we had to get a larger bed..but that was okay too. Now that it is warmer weather though, he sleeps on the hardwood floor and then moves to a bed that we placed in the corner of the bedroom.

Probably not the answer that you wanted but they do like to be close. :wink:
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
THANK YOU THANK YOU THANK YOU

for all the great advice. Well, we could tell that we really needed to move her back into our room. On top of that, I picked up all our shoes off the floor and anything else she could get into, and we put her dog pillow by the bed. We left her out of her crate, and she was such a good girl all night. She did not make a sound! She was just happy to be next to us I think. We were both excited to sleep through the night. Thanks again for all the input. We will keep you posted on her progress. So far she has learned to sit and shake, and we are working on her laying down. Eventually, I will teach her to fetch the remote and bring me a blanket, but I figured we'd start with the basics! (Oh just a quick question, which side do you teach your dog to walk on when leashed? Does it matter and should you be consistant about it? I try not to let her get ahead of us when we go on walks and to stay by us. It is hard work and I'm not sure if I should be trying to make her stay right with us on the side.)
 
G

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So glad you got a good nights sleep! It means so much when you HAVEN"T been getting one :lol:
Staying next to you while walking is called the 'heel' command. Here is what I found about picking the side to walk on:
It is best to teach the dog to heel on the opposite side from which we mount our shotgun to shoot.
:lol:
hahaha!
No, seriously, if you are right handed the dog should walk on your left and vice versa. Here is a training page that discusses how to teach it:
http://www.thecheckcord.com/archives/heel.html
Its a great command. When I want Bella to have the freedom to sniff around or play or run ahead, I then give her the 'Break' or 'take a break' command.
Good luck!
 

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So glad you found something that worked! Sandy does fine at night if I fall asleep on the couch and don't wake up until its nearly morning - he sleeps on the floor without the slightest problem. No waking up to find something is destroyed. We will eventually sleep regularly without the crate, but we aren't nearly ready for it yet. I like knowing he's safe in his crate - and so does he.

I've been able to teach Sandy all the puppy basics, just by repitition. He learns a new trick or command in 4-5 tries - however leash training has been a nightmare for us. I swore I wouldn't use a retractable leash, but just recently bought one and it has worked wonders for us. I let him extend it and then he panics being so far away and runs right back to my (left) side - when he begins to come back I tell him to heel. It is starting to work and has slowed the pulling considerably, even when I lock the leash. Of course we don't go far as Sandy still has 2 more weeks to go before his 16 week shots :)

Good luck :) I'm glad you're able to enjoy her again!
 

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James,
Glad you found something that works for Lucy. Sleep can be a wonderful thing!

Kristen,
I use the gentle leader for Jonah....works like a charm! I'm not a fan of the retractable leashes. I got too many nasty burns from being wrapped in it. And that was with my little cocker spaniel. With Jonah, I'd probably lose a limb! :shock:
 
G

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Also there is a constant tension on the retractable leash, it is really best to get them used to a loose leash. The constant tension combined with the resulting freedom when using the retractable leash tells them that if they pull they get to go where they want. A long lead would be a better training tool.
Bella hated the gentle leader, but did great with a harness type collar. One had the attached ring at her chest and one had the ring at her back. With either one her pulling stopped dramatically. She knows heel now, so we just use her regular collar and she walks beautifully.
 

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Actually with Sandy I have found the opposite. His recall is much better and he has almost completely quit pulling, even when the leash is locked. Unless of course he tries to run after one of the kids. But we're working on that, too. With the new freedom of the retractable he realizes he doesn't like when he is far from my side.

It may not be the right way, but it works for us.
 

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i'm not a big fan of the retractable leashes either, for several reasons.

- as gene said, the "cord" part of the leash can be hard to hold on to, and even cause rope burns. also, that little latch or whatever to 'lock' the leash can be hard to operate in a panic. those handles aren't designed for pulling the dog backwards closer to you, either, so if you want to shorten the distance between you and your dog you basically have to go to your dog, not the other way around (unless the dog knows "come" of course).

- the plastic handle can be hard to grasp if the dog startles suddenly or takes off after something. and once you've dropped it and it is on the ground, it starts retracting away from you!

- it essentially teaches the dog that it is ok to pull on the leash, and as the pup grows up and loses the instinctive urge to stay near you it can even start pulling once it reaches the end of the retractable leash

- i feel nervous sometimes when i see someone walking their dog along a busy street with a retractable leash in the 'unlocked' position -- what if their dog decides to suddenly dart out into the street? the leash is long enough that the dog could end up in traffic.

we feel like controlled walking is a really important skill for kumo to know, because it allows him to fit comfortably into human society, meaning we can take him more places with us! we've taught him how to walk in front of us on a loose leash, and we're working on heel (he does it on leash but not so good off leash yet). it is difficult to teach -- we basically brought treats on every walk and rewarded good behavior.

we also did that thing where when you're walking and the dog starts pulling, you immediately turn around and walk the other direction until the dog stops pulling. at first it took a REALLY long time to make it around the block when we were out for a walk, but kumo is a pretty smart dog and it didn't take long for him to catch on. also, that technique hasn't worked very well for me with other dogs i've had in the past. we also have a "pinch" or "prong" collar, but we don't really need to use it much. there was a thread about them a couple months ago:

http://labradoodle-dogs.net/forums/viewtopic.php?t=3175

-em
 

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Ok dare to be different is probably in my genes.

I still use a retractable leash with both Max and peanut DEPENDING on the situation or where i am. Max has been taught alot easier NOT to pull and now peanut is learning this much better with a retractable.

NOW if i am going to the vets or a store I use a regular leash with him and the retractable with peanut.

With a retractable i then graduate to a 30 and/or 50ft lead to training them further. So for me retractables still work better at home in my yard. But when going out i use the old fashioned 6ft heavy duty leash as with 65lbs of hyper muscle when he gets excited then a retractable leash is dangerous. With Peanut though she is much smaller and learning NOT to pull with it and i can use it anywhere.
 

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Bahahahhahaaahahaaa!!!!!
Retractable leash, I am looking at
Denver and it just makes me laugh.
I tried it once and Denver and I both stopped to have a good laugh
as it was hysterical.
I look at the size of the thread that is supposed to hold onto a
90 plus lb Doodle and well Denver and I are now rolling on the floor laughing over that visual.
bahahahaahahhahaaa.


Anywhoo whatever works for your dog is what is best for you.
Sue
 

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SUE not all of us have Horsadoodles hahahhahahhaaaa

peanut may turn out to be quite small ...smaller than we thought. she's a cross between a mini andmedium sized doodle right now.

Max is definitely working towards using a gentle leader in the future though we rarely take him anywhere besides the vet's .
Then again i have 6 acres for our doodles to run and play on which is the main reason they don't go shopping with us.
 

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It is better to have the dog walking quietly by your side than pulling. When you let the dog go first, you are teaching it that it is the leader! It also comes in Really handy when you are carrying a couple of bags of groceries and can't see the dog in front of you.

I train the heel on a six foot leather lead, using a choke chain. PLEASE get instruction on putting the collar on correctly so that it will release and won't choke your dog when you release pressure on the leash. The metal shank on the leash should hang straight down from the dog's throat until you add a correction. The dog should get used to the feeling of the draped lead.

Once the dog is confirmed on heel and recall, there is something called a light line that I once used with good success and would try again. It's basically a long string attached to a short section of rope. The dog soon thinks it's off lead, and can take off, the only problem being that you have the other end of the string, and are able to still correct. The dog gets the idea that somehow, even when he is off leash, he can still be corrected. This comes in handy when he gets to the independent stage.

It would be advisable to find good training, preferably at an obedience club if you can find one in your area. They can help you perfect the "heel," as well as other valuable information. The "drop" command, or getting a dog to lie down, is the most challenging, as it is asking the dog, in canine body language, to submit.

Thanks for the update on Lucy. She's getting cuter by the day!
 
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