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I need some advice. Max is now one year's old. He is basically quite a good dog. He obeys my husband and is quite submissive around him. However, when I am alone with Max he jumps (with all four feet off the ground) on me. He barks at me (not aggressively) Sometimes he looks to see if my husband can see him and when all is clear he proceeds to nudge and nidp. He basially will not leave me alone. By the time my husband comes home or returns to the room, I am exhausted and ready for a nap. I don't ever remember owning a dog like this. When we are all together however, Max is a joy.

Help,

Patty
 
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Hi Patty,
It sounds like Max views you as a playmate! :lol: The only solution is to get another doodle for him to play with.......
JUST KIDDING! :lol:
OK, I am no expert, but it sounds like maybe you need to be a little more assertive with him. Reorder the pack kind of thing--- You need to make sure he knows YOU are the leader, not him. Here is a good article (I know it also mentions aggression/biting, just ignore those parts)
http://sonic.net/~cdlcruz/GPCC/library/alpha.htm
We definitely had some issues with Bella and the trainer was quick to point them out when she came. Some things we have been doing at her request to make things better:
"Sit" before allowing her to eat. We eat first before feeding her (even if we have to pretend we are eating :lol: ). We always go thru doors first. She has learned and obeys the "Off" command which has cured her jumping on people. She has also learned the "wait" command...a huge help! I also have my 6y/o do the commands and feed her, because she definitely views him as a playmate.
If anyone else has some expert advice, please post! I could be completely wrong!
 

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Hi Patty...what do you do when Max jumps up on you? Dexter used to jump up on me all the time when he was a puppy! He also used to hump my leg almost all the time and would rarely do it to my husband. Once I showed him I was in charge, he gradually stopped (he still jumps up occassionally). If he would jump up on me I'd turn my back to him and try to ignore him. If he continued, I'd give him a time-out in his confined area. He was always much more submissive w/my husband than me. Now it's almost totally better and he acts the same around both of us. Good luck!
 

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It sounds like Max views you as a playmate!
Linda is right Max does think of you as a playmate and that can be
changed.
When Denver was younger he used to bite me literally til I bled.
I was crying all the time out of sheer frustration. I learned from trainors
and people on this forum how to change his behavior.
When he would try to bite me, I just walked away and when he tried to jump, I also walked away. If I was not able to get out of the way in time when he jumped, I turned my back to him or if i could not turn in time I would put my knee in his way. This took a lot of constant replays on my part but it did work. I tried the loud yelling ouch etc but this did NOT work for Denver but ignoring him and walking away did. He learned if he wanted to play with Mom it better be with nice manners or all played stop.
Good luck IT WILL GET BETTER
 

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HI Patty nice to meet you!!!

I too have to say Max looks at you like a litter/playmate and not a pack leader.
Walking away and ignoring him gives him the hint. Hmm i bite mommie and she doesn't give me attention. he'll get the messsage sooner or later.
Also do you always give him attention when he asks for it?

OUR max used to mouth my boys terribly and tried even growling once at the 14yr old....So my sons got a lesson and learned to ignor max when he acted up. AND when he tried growling again my son got him on the floor and let him in a VERY firm voice know who was boss. that was 2months ago and no problems since.
peanut is now learning what NO means and if she jumps up we simply walk away. If she nips alot we say NO then hand her a chew toy...if she keeps up WE all IGNORE HER.

Doodles hate to be ignored. then again who doesn't?
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for all your imput, but when you turn around and walk away did your dog jump at you from behind? This is what Max does. Sometimes he jumps so high he grabs my hair.

What I have been doing is keeping a lead on him when he is in the house with me. I command him to lie down and after several attempts he does. I keep my foot on the lead to attempt to get him to settle. After a few moments he tries to jump up and nip the bottom of my leg. The only time I can get him to listen is if I have yelled really loud. This is difficult for me because I have never been comfortable yelling. I have been told to be persistent but sometimes it is overwhelming.

I am not sure I know what else to do to show him that I am his leader not his puppymate.

I have wondered lately if perhaps he can sense that I might be feeling a bit anxious when I am alone with him. I don't know.
 
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Don't yell! Even if you think it is working, it's not! You should only ask tell a dog to do something ONCE, then MAKE them do it. The leash being on is a great idea and will help enforce the command.
Here is an excerpt:
Your dog watches you constantly and reads your body language. He knows if you're insecure, uncomfortable in a leadership role or won't enforce a command. This behavior confuses him, makes -him- insecure and if he's a natural leader or has a social-climbing personality, it'll encourage him to assume the alpha position and tell -you- what to do.

"Alpha" is an attitude. It involves quiet confidence, dignity, intelligence, an air of authority. A dog can sense this attitude almost immediately - it's how his mother acted towards him. Watch a professional trainer or a good obedience instructor. They stand tall and use their voices and eyes to project the idea that they're capable of getting what they want. They're gentle but firm, loving but tough, all at the same time. Most dogs are immediately submissive towards this type of personality because they recognize and respect alpha when they see it.

Practice being alpha. Stand up straight with your shoulders back. Walk tall. Practice using a new tone of voice, one that's deep and firm. Don't ask your dog to do something - tell him. There's a difference. He knows the difference, too! Remember that, as alpha, you're entitled to make the rules and give the orders. Your dog understands that instinctively.

A trainer NEVER yells. They usually have a great, strong but calming voice.
Once your dog knows you are in charge, he will really settle down and will be much happier (as will you!) If at all possible, an in home trainer could be a miracle worker. She can observe what you are doing and immediately make changes to correct it. The cost is not much more than taking 2 group classes (Ours is less than 2 group classes) and the advancement and learning (by Bella and her family!) has been 10x faster.
Here is an idea...have a set training time, wear clothing he can't grab...boots with pant legs tucked in?...I can honestly say that the big hurdle was getting Bella to know what we wanted, once the light bulb went on for her, DOING it was easy! I bet Max has NO IDEA why you would rather have him stay down and not nip your pants...to him it is soo much fun...and he does not realize you HATE it! You have to teach him, calmly, so he retains it.
 

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amen Linda!!

as I told DAVE the other night who was tired, worked 50hrs by thursday night, was up to his eyeballs in poop, and could barely keep his eyes open and finally didn't have the patience left raised his voice slightly with max.

know what i said? Dave if a dog can hear so much better than us why did you raise your voice honey? he can hear you jsut fine, and don't repeat yourself. Say it once, firmly and if not make him settle

he agreed and it worked. I also praise them when I say settle and they do.

I am far from perfect but i have rules for reasons. Just like my teenagers know when i say NO i mean it and if not i either ignore them or show them what i mean. I also don't yell with my teenagers cause they tune you out .
Dogs are like kids in many ways but they can hear better but have mor selective hearing till they know you mean business.

i agree a PRIVATE TRAINER for a few sessions would probably work wonders :D
 

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You are right. I know I should not yell. I start out calm and then when he doesn't listen it just escalates.

Also, we did have an in house trainer but she did not address this issue saying that he would outgrow this behaviour. Anyway, I believe you are right that- Alpha is an attitude and it is an attitude that I need to exhibit with Max.

Thanks for you advice.
 
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Patty, wow, I am surprised the trainer would say he would outgrow it. It is a manners issue and could be potentially be a safety issue if he jumps on people besides you. Of course he will eventually outgrow it (age 10? :lol: ), but what are you supposed to do in the mean time? I would call that trainer and tell her he did not OUTGROW it yet, what is the timetable? :lol: Actually, I think our doodles are like puppy's till 18 months or 2 years.
My trainer was recommended by my vet. They seem to know who is good because of all the dogs they see.
Good Luck! It sounds like you are doing the right thing with the leash attached. I am sure he feels very safe around you and that is why he always wants to play with you. Cute when they are little, a real pain when they get big! Hang in there!
 

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When Jonah was in his nipping stage, My trainer said the usuasl things taht were covered here. She also said if it gets too much, say ouch, cross your arms...STOMP into another room, shut the door...wait 5 minutes, come back out....ignore them and DON'T look at them for another 5 minutes. Took one time with Jonah...no more biting, or if he did nip, all I had to say was OUCH and it turned into kisses instead.
 
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Boyd was doing the same thing to me and my husband gently pointed out that I pay way too much attention to Boyd. After my husband provided numerous examples :roll: I agreed with him and did what Vanessa did.

In about a week I noticed that Boyd was listening to me better and thinking twice before going for my hands. Although he will fake a bite - he'll go for my hand and at the last minute go for his toy instead!! :lol:
 

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You might want to check out Cesar Millan's (the "Dog Whisperer") web site at www.dogpsychologycenter.com

The last time I visited the site he had a short article on dogs that jump. He said it is a sign of a dog that is desperate for a leader. It sounds as though your husband is the leader when he's around, but the dog seems to have assigned you a place on the bottom of the pile, and continues to try asserting his dominance over you.

One thing in herd dynamics with horses (Might dogs be the same?) is that there is a difference between Alpha and Leader. An alpha horse will be more aggressive in asserting his territorial rights, while a leader does not get involved in fights, rather shows his leadership be remaining above it all. Hence, ignoring behavior may not be a bad idea. Remember that it must be Consistent!!! No exceptions! And done quietly to assert leadership. The dog will respect and follow someone whom he has identified as his Leader. Trust is an important part of the dog's selecting a leader, too. As stated earlier, body language has Everything to do with being a leader. Stand strong and straight, so that he can See your leadership.

All the best to you and Max! Keep us posted.
 
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