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You all have been extremely helpful! We live in Georgia and have decided on a Labradoodle. We are looking for a puppy that eventually be 35 pounds or under (20-30 pounds would be ideal). We have terrible allergies so we need a puppy that will be as hypo-allergenic as possible. We also had a bad experience with a poodle that very yappy and a cocker spaniel that was timid. So personality and temperment are of extreme importance.

It seems like the mutigernational Austrailian Labradoodles are about $1000 more than the F1B American bread. So my question is what is the diiference? And is it worth the extra money?

Thank you all for your support.
 

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Hi,

I think I wouldn't worry at this point F1b versus Australian. I would take your other criteria and start looking for a breeder that has what you want - size, coat and temperment wise. Once you find a breeder you click with and your criteria are met then I don't think generation or maybe even a bit of a price difference will matter that much to you anymore.

If you do some searches on past posts you will see that some folks have very strong opinions about American versus Australian labradoodles. In my opinion, with the criteria you listed a pup from either can meet your needs.

I ended up with an Australian but it wouldn't have mattered to me if he was an F1b. I found a breeder I really liked and these happened to be the puppies she had at the time. She had both parents on site, we could come and visit and bring the children, the puppies were raised in the house, she used early neurological stimulation on the puppies, she started crate training before the pups came home, has done excellent testing and had a great contract, the puppies were going to be the size I was looking for - under 40lbs, I could go on and on. She met my criteria and had a puppy with the temperment I wanted.

Start looking within your budget, talk to lots of breeders, and keep an open mind and I think you will find a breeder that you just click with.

Good luck!

Heather
 

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Hi,

I have to agree with Heather. I also own an Australian Labradoodle - but would have been happy with an F1b (or a non-shedding F1 for that matter). It was important for me to have a non-shedding (allergy-friendly) dog - which mine is - I've had no problems with her at all.

As I don't have an F1b and haven't had much contact with this form of doodle, I wouldn't be able to compare temperaments (and of course there is a great deal of variation from doodle to doodle) - I do have the impression though that these are generally lovely out-going dogs - intelligent but friendly and sweet-natured. If you make sure you find a good breeder who socialises the pups from a young age and you make sure yourself that you take the necessarily steps to educate and socialise your pup, then I imagine regardless of whether the pup is an F1b or a multigen, you would have a lovely natured companion.

To find out specifically about the Australian Labradoodle, you might like to visit the Rutland Manor website (this isn't meant to be an advert but rather it's a good source of information) - Beverley Rutland-Manners is one of the co-founders of the Australian Labradoodle and there is a wealth of information on this site regarding the infusions involved in this breed (it's not just a mix of Labrador and Poodle but is infused with Irish Water Spaniel and American Cocker Spaniel too - and recently there is a line with the soft-coated Wheaten Terrier).

So, there are obvious differences in the make-up of the dogs - but what this equates to in the coat and temperament of the dogs is something I wouldn't know to answer.

Good luck with finding your perfect companion.

Libby
 

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The F1B Labradoodle is the most likly of any to be no shed and allergy friendly

the Australian Labradoodles tend to have other breeds infused in them,,Cockers and Terriers, as well as Poodle bred back numerous times, this does nothing to keep the hybrid vigor of the breed...

There are several breeders on this forum that breed F1B labradoodles that are very responsible breeders, Several of which i myself would feel comfortable in purchasing from

good luck in your search, Doodles are awsome!!!
 

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I think that I can explain the price difference quite easily. Breeding dogs cost anywhere from $18,000 to $40,000 for an Australian Multigen. Standard Poodles and F1 Labradoodles are much less expensive. Therefore, F1Bs are not priced as high as AMs.
Find a good quality breeder and the price will not be so important. I beleive that if you find a breeder that you can trust, one who tests their breeding stock and will stand by their buyers and puppies for life, you will be satisfied. All of the pups are adorable and it is very easy to love any generation.
Many F1B puppies are low to non shedding and do not aggravate allergies. Not all of them are in that category though. Most Australian Labradoodles are more consistent with coats, but you can always get a throw back. So, as in all things, buyer beware.
If you find a good, honest breeder, he/she will tell it like it is because they will not want to have their pup rehomed. It is much easier to tell someone up front what to expect than to find out later that it isn't a good fit. None of us wants to have our pups facing a rehome situation.
 

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Jac said:
Breeding dogs cost anywhere from $18,000 to $40,000 for an Australian Multigen.
Is this initial cost typically recouped by most breeders?
 

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I don't know much about the multigens; I am just a doodle owner, not a breeder. But I can tell you that our 9mo doodle, Pixie, is an F1b, 3/4 miniature poodle and 1/4 lab. We got her from Gleneden in Virginia. She has the most wonderful temperament. My sister has a doodle from the same breeder and she is a wonderful dog too. When we were talking about temperament, I asked the breeder if she gives a temperament test. She said has found them to be unreliable, but that she expected our pup to be playful and friendly like her other dogs. And that describes Pixie exactly. Pixie's parents were 30 and 35lbs respectively, so we think she'll be no more than that (she's about 24lbs at 9 months). Pixie does not shed and does not even smell like a dog unless she's wet. I have one friend w/very severe allergies that held Pixie, and later said she had a slight reaction. I have dog allergies and I get no reaction, and I've had no other comments about anyone reacting to her.

Just food for thought..good luck with your search!
 

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AS Jac stated, the prices of breeding dogs are Extremely Expensive with Aust. Multi-gens which thus is passed on via consumer , all a part of doing business.

NOW multi-gen vs f1 or f1b LD /GD

I say GO FOR TEMPERAMENT 1ST while if you have severe allergies trying to get nonshedding quality coat too.

YOU can pay $1000-$2500 or more for a doodle, some are known to be more low to nonshedding than others.
but a BREEDER you like, can work with, and find the Right temperament/personality for you and your family is utmost as it's a 10 to 15yr committment.along with waht you are looking for: testing of parents to rule out Genetic Diseases, bad hips, offers a health warranty you understand and like, etc
and in the end:

if you have a nonshedding doodle that doesn't fit in well to your family and lifestyle................was it worth it?

I know i am harping about temperament but soemetimes we get caught up in the LOOKS so much we fail to overlook an energetic more independent puppy might not fit in good with a family that doesn't like to long walks, hikes etc
whereas sometimes we overlook the quieter calmer puppy thinking something is wrong and may be a good fit too.

Size? that's a personal choice, color, same, price again the same
Temperament and health ....this is so important

I have severe allergies and my son does too along with asthma
luckily for the past 1.5years we've been totally fine with our doodles
Max is a f1 LD who sheds Minimally to almost nonshedding
Peanut a f1 GD who does NOT shed
Beau the same as peanut

good luck
 

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Multigen and f1B

We have a 6 month old American Multigen. Both of her parents are F1B labradoodles, not Australian. She has a beautiful fleece, non-shedding coat. This was very important to us. We had a standard poodle for 15 years and loved the fact that she did not shed. We also have allergies. HOWEVER, if your family has severe outdoor allergies, you have to make sure your pet does not hang out amongst the pollen all day! Any dog can bring outdoor allergens into the house. Proper maintenance of your pets coat is always a good idea if you have allergies.

In addition to her coat, temperament is EXTREMELY important. Puppies that are hand raised are wonderful. Our dog came from Southern Charm Labradoodles. The breeder takes great steps to ensure her puppies are raised well. Take the time to visit breeders and get to know them. You will learn a lot.
 

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Aloha:

We are on the list for a multigenerational Australian labradoodle pup. As we live in Hawaii, we are dealing with one breeder here due to quarantine restrictions and wanting to raise the puppy from an appropriate age in terms of training. With mainland restrictions we would need to wait till the pup is at least 5 months old for FEVN testing and rabies etc. I have done quite a bit research on the breed and we had a Shiba Inu for 15 years prior to losing him. My question is, the breeder we are working with says the dog is tested for retinal atrophy, dysplasia, though I am not sure about Addison's which can be predominant in the breed. Is it appropriate to ask for these certifications and a history of the breeding stock in terms of other issues? I have a medical background but do not want to offend the breeder. Thank You for any insight.
 
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