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For as smart as these dogs are, why is it Jonah and Miko will feast on sticks etc...even when 2 times a month, it makes Jonah vomit?

And on a grosser note....Miko is eating her own poop on occasion, especially if she has an accident in the house. Is this her way of destroying the evidence, or has she become a "poop fetish"? I know this was covered before, but what is it you add to their food to discourage this? She eats food well, her coat is good, ears, eyes, etc. She is very energetic. Should I take a stool sample to the vet for testing?

Any advice would be appreciated! Thanks!!
 

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Gene, our vet said for some dogs it is just another food source for some, yuck! We tried MSG on the food, suppose to make poop yucky. Not to Toby he still helped himself! :shock: He still will eat poop if it is not cleaned up immediately. Sorry not to have better news. Good Luck!
 

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gene said:
Well, at least we're not alone! Kinda makes me skeptical about those loving kisses! :shock:
OHHHHHHHH I AM GOING to be good and NOT make a joke this time!! hahahaha

Gene sometimes when a dog eats their poop they might be lacking in a certain nutrient. Ask your vet.

and even though these doodles are SMART...remember they are DOGS and dogs eat grass, sticks, socks, panties, paper napkins and/or anything that fits in their mouths hahahhaha thank heavens we don't fit nor do our kids hahhahaha!!!!!

why dogs eat poop? the 9th wonder of the world perhaps?
and if we ever have a doodle romp i'll have to take notes on which DOODLES aren't allowed to kiss me :wink: (ok making notes now,,,Toby, Miko,hmmm who's the other ones?) :wink:
 

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No, it really is quite sensible...to dogs.
You see, we are looking at it as a gross thing...but to dogs, things are very natual and eating poop is one of those things...especially for female dogs. Why? Because they were not always domesticated!
In order for a mother to protect her young, they had to remove scents that might draw preditors to them. So, mother dogs eat the poop of her babies...no scent is left. As they get older, they have seen their mother do this and often the dog learns to clean up the same way.
Same with eating vomit...gross to us, but to dogs very natural...mama dog regurgitates her food for weaning puppies to eat. (Just like birds!)
And...about the sticks...dogs like them because it gives their jaws and teeth exercise. They didn't always eat kibble and canned foods...dogs LIKE to eat sticks ... and they like the musky flavor of them. They enjoy shredding them too. They like things that shred easily. So, the main thing about sticks would be to make certain they are not swallowing splinters or even the twig when it gets small. If they're going to eat sticks, make sure they are big ones...and never from fruit trees, nut trees or things like red oak, black locust, yew, red maple, azaleas, etc. Some of these will make your dog sick, others are seriously toxic.
(I have a great little book called "The Secret Lives of Dogs, The Real Reasons behind 52 Mysterious Canine Behaviors" by Jana Murphy and the Editors of Pets. :wink: )
 

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I've always understood the poop eating thing to be some sort of mineral or nutritional imbalance. Not that you arent' feeding her correctly, but perhaps there's something else that her body needs.

Interesting about your book, Jac. I've added it to my shopping cart at amazon.com. Thanks for the tip. That ought to be interesting reading.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks all....I feel better about this...still grossed out, but OK! :wink:

Jac, I just put the book on reserve at the Library. Thanks.
 

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Haven't read the book so shouldn't comment, but I sometimes wonder how much we can really know about behavior, especially in another species but even for us. So much of the lore out there is based on assumptions and extrapolations. That said, I found Brian Kilcommons' book "Good Owners, Great Dogs" to be really helpful when my last dog was a pup. He offers insights about behavior like "spot wetting" indoors, saying that if a dog has chosen a favorite place to relieve himself you need to bring that area "into the mainstream" so the dog sees it as a part of the house he'll be using frequently. Giving him his food there does that pretty effectively - after cleaning it and descenting it, of course! This technique worked beautifully when my Dane suddenly decided that it was okay to urinate in the upstairs hallway. Never had another problem with her. His idea of understanding the thought processes of a dog and using them to train seemed to be excellent, and he had insights that I'd never seen anywhere else. Maybe newer books talk about them more, but they were a revelation for me.

I ordered a couple of books that were recommended here: "Puppy Training for Kids" and "Another Piece of the Puzzle: Puppy Development"
but haven't gotten them yet even though the order went in on April 19. Amazon seems to have some issue with them. At this rate I'll receive them about the same time as the puppy!
 

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i probably should read a book or two that have been mentioned.

for me most of my training and when possible common sense is from being raised on a farm with animals and ******* cousins :wink: I also sometimes relate dogs to kids....but keep in mind they are DOGS still.

I do know if any of us pick up a phone to talk, Max does his best to redirect our attention on HIM. :roll: hahhahhahaha

so like when Peanut and max may become territorial over food or a pigs ear with each other that's okay as Long AS any of us in the family can take it away at any given moment with NO snarls, growls etc.

I am a firm believer in the mineral/nutrient deficiency. When a pregnant woman craves CHAULK ( yes some do) it means the body is low in calcium. Some cravings have an basis.
NOW with dogs i believ some things are based that way and other things is no matter how domesticated they are they still have some natural innate instincts. Is poop eating one of them? that i don't know.

Black Walnuts are TOXIC folks!!! i happen to have 4 of them about 60yrs old so walking the dogs in one area is not fun and i rake up what the squirrels leave on the ground. Wisteria leaves are toxic too.

Dogs do NOT LIKE aromatic plants....which if you use them as borders does help keep them OUT of gardens. Aromatic could be Siver Mound or even Herbs like low growing oregano.

And also dogs can be taught to walk down stepping stones thru a garden and not roll in your garde. Or at least i did this with a neighbor's yellow lab. NOW let's see if this works with mine starting this week.


oh shoot i went off on a tangent ...sorry worked 58hours last week and today i am recouping on my day off hahahhahaa
 

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Lastly...any dog that eats POOP aint giving me a doodle kiss :wink: hahahahhahahahaaa
 
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Hi Gene!!! Welcome to the doodle poop eating club!! :roll:

Boyd discovered this tasty treat during the winter and he's still at it! When I took him to the vet the other week I asked him about it and he said it's completely normal - some dogs just like to eat their own poop.

Now I have to watch Boyd go and immediately pick it up. I tell ya though, no matter how vigilant I think I am, Boyd still manages to find some. He knows I don't like it so he'll grab it and take off in a doodle frenzy. Oh well, he gets his teeth brushed alot these days.....
 

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Annmarie, we always taught our dogs to stay on the garden path, too. We have a pretty big vegetable garden with brick pathways, and our Danes could come in with us as long as they didn't step on the dirt. We also teach our dogs to "piddle" on command, which is useful when it's late at night and you want them to get down to business, and also to wipe their feet, which really cracks guests up. You take advantage of their natural tendency to circle and wave your hand around over their head while they're on the mat, saying "Wipe your feet!" in a pleased, excited way, and very soon they're responding to the command and going around in circles, thus cleaning their paws off - at least somewhat.

Our dogs have never been interested in their own products but they eat deer droppings as though they were raisins. Oh, goody! you can see them thinking. A treat! And Eskimo dogs are reputedly especially partial to human waste, to the extent that you have to have someone standing watch if you need to heed nature's call in the Arctic, so the dogs don't get into a fight over the delectable tidbit at your - er - rear.

Leslie
 

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OMG Leslie....we have 6 acres of deer droppings hahhahaa and i have managed to get most of the deer to stay more down at the creek area and less around the pool to house area. WHEW! otherwise Max gets an instant Perm the minute he sees those deer poop pellets. rolling in them is even MORE Fun :roll: lately though Max listens to us better and doesn't do this much anymore.
 

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I heard once that when a dog sees you pick up their poop they think you're eating it. They associate your hand with food, therefore, you must be eating it because it's gone (I know, gross!).

On the other note, Cinnamon will roll in deer, coyote or whatever droppings, eat goose poop if not caught in time but she will steer clear, even going out of her way to avoid anything that she might have left. It's kind of funny, but I'm glad she at least doesn't eat it!!

She got 3 baths last week for all the rolling she did. It's really gross when she gets up from rolling in it, shakes and the stuff goes flying. EEWW!!! I know a dog isn't supposed to get a bath that often, but there is something about the rolling in the poop thing that will really gross me out and it doesn't come out with just water.

I've had a lot of trouble with Amazon putting my order on hold. I now go to the source and buy from the publisher if I get put on hold for so long. Or the local library. They'll get it for you for free!
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Cinsmom said:
I heard once that when a dog sees you pick up their poop they think you're eating it. They associate your hand with food, therefore, you must be eating it because it's gone (I know, gross!).
There you go....I'm busted! It's been me all along eating the poop! :oops: :wink:
 

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Cinsmom, libraries and I don't get along. When my kids were little we never remembered to bring things back on time; besides, I reread and I like to have the books handy. And if I borrow 'em I can't refer back to them, or highlight especially useful passages.

I'm not sure why Amazon does that; it's only the second time, and I order from them a lot, but when it happens it's a pain.

We have geese, and our Dane thought their droppings were the most marvelous tidbits. I had forgotten about that.

Leslie
 

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It is funny reading this because most of what you are saying is also in the book! (See how smart you all are!)
Poop eating can be due to a deficiency, they talk about that...and that they just plain like it!
There is more that they say, but heck, I'll let you read your books when they come.

Leslie, I always wondered that too...how can we possibly know what the dogs are thinking or reasoning...or IF they reason...until I had 6 dogs and a bunch of litters of puppies. Now, I can say from plain observation and experience, that they DO think and reason. They do learn from watching their "top dog" (either the mama dog or the person in the family who takes on top dog status.) Of course, I can't say why...or identify what motivates them...but they are as individual as people are.
My dogs do something that amaze me...I have not taught this...they just "know"...we live in the mountains and sometimes when deer walk by or when people DARE to drive on our road, all 6 of the dogs start barking madly. They run into the garage barking their heads off...I go to the door and sand there and, even while they are barking, I whisper, "enough" and every single one stops. They look at me and don't move. They never make even the slightest sound. And the deer or car is still there!

I have a neurotic one, an obsessed one, a charmer, a control freak, an innocent happy go lucky one....they each have personalities that I can spot. I know what to expect from them...I don't believe that this is happenstance...I think that they have reasoned, learned about me and what I want, and they act accordingly.

So, what I am saying is that I believe that they do things for reasons...and that much of what they do is genetic, just as our "caveman" genetics takes oversometimes (I've dated some that are pretty darn close to dragging fists on the ground!) But also they are capable of learning what their mother teaches. And it just makes sense that they cover their scent...

If you see a mama dog cleaning up after her babies, you would notice...it isn't about doing something they are enjoying or because they are hungry...its much more primal. So interesting!
 

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He offers insights about behavior like "spot wetting" indoors, saying that if a dog has chosen a favorite place to relieve himself you need to bring that area "into the mainstream" so the dog sees it as a part of the house he'll be using frequently. Giving him his food there does that pretty effectively - after cleaning it and descenting it, of course! This technique worked beautifully when my Dane suddenly decided that it was okay to urinate in the upstairs hallway. Never had another problem with her.
Thanks for the tip on that trick. It will come in handy with housebreaking a puppy. Looks like I may have a keeper or two in this litter.

That procedure seems to work as well as the one I did to stop Nani's digging when she discovered it. I was told to fill the hole she had dug nearly to the top with her own poop, then put a thin layer of dirt over it. The next time the dog digs there, they get their nails all full of their own poop, and lose interest in digging. It worked like a charm. I only had to do this once or twice and she never dug again.
 

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hahahahaha Have you ever written in this forum ( a novel like mine, above) and then hit enter and said to yourself, "What the hell did I say that for???"
Sorry...I write like I talk...too much, too fast! And way beyond the topic!
 

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...how can we possibly know what the dogs are thinking or reasoning...or IF they reason...until I had 6 dogs and a bunch of litters of puppies. Now, I can say from plain observation and experience, that they DO think and reason. They do learn from watching their "top dog" (either the mama dog or the person in the family who takes on top dog status.)
Right you are, Jac. I'd always said that nothing around here would be allowed on the furniture until she's spayed. Well.... last week I dragged Deva up onto my lap to work on a mat behind her ear. Now I have to put a piece of foil on my seat the moment I get out of it, or she's right there... not curled up sleeping, but Sitting in it, just as I would do! Ditto the couch, when I dragged her up there a few days later. Live and learn....
 
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