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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Does anyone have an opinion on one-on-one trainers? Sam has been to puppy pre-school and has done very well. He sits, lies down; sometimes he even comes when called, walks on a loose leash and stays/waits. I figure at 11 weeks (nearly 12), he's doing pretty well. Having said this, when there are distractions, everything just turns pear shaped! Consequently, I'm considering getting him a few sessions with a personal dog trainer. When he's older, I also want to put him through at least one obedience class. Does anyone work with one? If so, do you find this useful?
 

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We did a 2nd group class with Dexter. I think it was a good experience for him, but I would wait - our trainer suggested a 2nd class around adolescence.
 

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Ok my trainer had Max and I arrive EARLY to class that way we observed a different class and Max had to learn to sit still.
by the 3rd class he was settled down completely , then again he was 7mos old

even though i don't like distractions it was an aid in training, as it is part of obedience training.
when i do short sessions with each doodle at home using a lead collar ,, i do not crate them and make the doodle i am working with concentrate on me.

a one on one i am sure would be GREAT though but can more $$$
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
No no no.....I think you're advice about another group class during adolescence makes a lot of sense. Thanks for that :D . I might also do one one-on-one series see how Sam goes with that. Never having owned a dog before, I want to be sure to cover all my bases so Sam grows up to be a well-adjusted, well-socialised, polite dog. I've really appreciated everyone's advice. It's been great. Keep 'em rolling in.
 

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Sam is pretty young and puppies are distractible by nature. Don't expect too much from him at this age! We had training one-on-one for Chouette; friends of ours had used the trainer and liked him a lot. We had a ten-lesson series when Chouette was four months old; each one was only about ten minutes, and at the end the trainer worked with us to reinforce what he'd taught her.

But it's not a magic wand; after being perfect as a tiny thing, Chouette still developed issues about coming when called as she got a little older and more independent. A lot depends on how you handle your pup at home. I had to put Chou on a long light lead so that when I was giving the command "Chouette, come!" I could ALWAYS back it up with a pop if she just sat there weighing her options. The trainer told us that in circumstances where you couldn't enforce it, to use more general phrases like "C'mon, c'mon, c'mon" to get the dog to come to you. And only when the dog comes to you 99% of the time when she's leashed should you try giving the actual command when she or he is offleash and you can't back it up.

Besides this forum there are lots of resources for training on the web. Check out Sarah Wilson's show "Teacher's Pet" at
http://www.petliferadio.com/

She has great podcasts on training tips for your dog, including coming when called and listening when outside. You can download them and listen at your leisure. It helps if you have a highspeed connection, which I don't!

Leslie
 

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Ebbe was close to 5 mos. when we started one-on-one training following graduation from Petsmart's puppy class. :shock:
Her trainer is affiliated with her day care facility and he really helped us deal with some behaviors that had me in tears. :(
It's an ongoing thing with us ... every week for a while and now a periodic refresher! In fact, he'll get a call right soon as I need some advice on handling this bigger (70+ lbs) dog! :roll:
 

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Just my two cents worth...I AM THE MAIN TRAINER....when I get lazy (because sometimes it is just easier not to follow through when you give a command) Tanner will take advantage. He is extremely smart and a fast learner but at 16 months he still needs daily practice. Even 10 minutes a day makes a huge difference :wink:
 

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ANNIE you are so right!!!!
forgot to think of myself as The MAIN and sometimes only Trainer

I do know that doing short sessions daily WOW what an immediate improvement in all 3 doodles
 

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Please remember that Puppy Play training and Dog training are two separate things. Richard Wolters wrote some very good basic theories on mental development in dogs. They, like humans, have a 'TERRIBLE TWO's period as well as a teenage rebellion period and early adult independence issues. What that means to me is that training has to be reinforced periodically. Sometimes the dog has to taken back to lessons 1-10. Another mistake people make is trying to reinforce commands from a distance with no leash (control) over the dog. It kills me to watch someone chasing their dog down the street yelling COME. I feel total confidence in my ability to train Abby, YET I do have her signed up for an obedience class in February when she will be 6 months old for reinforcement--for both of us...mtd/abby/drkatz
 

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inside i say Come or clap my hands quickly ...they come running

outside i say" Bye Bye and sometimes "who wants to eat?" turning my back and walking to house. They come running

OH i have asked my family NOT to raise their voices , to save that for emergencies instead also a dog's hearing is much acute than ours,
BUT they do choose to have 'selective" hearing at times hahhahahaha
 

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after being perfect as a tiny thing, Chouette still developed issues about coming when called as she got a little older and more independent.
I think Tyke must be at that stage now! She was so good about coming to me when I called, but that has changed over the past few weeks, although she is still very good about sit, stay and shaking hands! It must be the independence thing. I'm using the leash method and it seems to be working with her, but on the occasion when she is off leash (but still in our fenced in backyard), if she doesn't come, I turn around and walk away - she usually gives up and follows me! This works really well at night, because Tyke is a big 'fraidy cat in the dark! If she doesn't come, I simply turn off the lights, shut the door and wait - it usually doesn't take long for that little paw to be scratching on the door! Independence is relative when it's dark outside!!! :wink:
 

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[ if she doesn't come, I turn around and walk away - she usually gives up and follows me!

As Dr Katz would say PURRFECT! Dr K teaches, "if you want a dog to come to you the thing to do is make it chase you!" Works EVERY TIME :wink: I will call her name turn and run a few feet then stop and look back--she's already caught up! Fast little buggers they are :lol: Then praise and good treat for responding. From another room in the house I play train with the command by keeping a treat in a closed fist. When she obeys and comes she licks the hand which magically opens exposing the treat. It's also a good technique for biting and mouthing dogs, substituting licking as the desired behavior...
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Yes...I agree with all of the above, but in our case Marc and I needed to learn some tricks of the trade!

Case in Point: Ebbe was tearing through the door to the back porch just in case the cat was out there! :roll:
She'd knock over anything or anybody in her zeal to see if Scully changed her mind and wanted to play :roll: :roll:

Taking Eric's training (and treats) enabled me to haul her back into the house and make her sit and wait until she was permitted to go out the back door ... and yes we did it over and over and over.
To the point where all I need now are hand signals for compliance :D

One-on-one training focuses on your dog and you ... especially when you're not quite sure what you are doing :oops: In our case ... it was priceless!
 

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Now can anyone here tell me how to train 3 doodles not to eat or shred socks and kitchen dish towels?
 

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Or to dine out of the cat food dish or litter box :wink: "LEAVE IT" seems to work at the moment, but I'm certain that as soon as my back is turned the temptation is too much whether it be cat food or dish towels. I'd also love to have a solution that is more consistent.
 
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