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Okay, thanks for all the suggestions on my "Pushy Doodle" question. Now I can see what's happening. This is not the first time. I am afraid that I have let this occur several times. The barking at me I thought was puppy play but now I see that Biscuit is trying to take top position from me.

Sometimes, he barks and then runs away from me in the house. I have tried to catch him to correct him but it has just became a game. I can see that he needs to wear his training leash again (13 ft.) so I can get ahold of him quickly to correct the behavior.

But, I am wondering. When correcting, do I look him straight in the eye the eye and say "NO" and then turn away. Or, do I stare him down till he submits? I have read that you don't stare down a dog, looking away is a sign of the leader. Is that true. Advice, advice, advice.

Oh my goodness, when I was a kid we just played with our dog, I had no idea what my parents must have went through to have a family dog!

Thanks.

Susan
 

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I guess that is what happens. Typically when I do that, I correct and then do something else immediately.
i.e.:

He's playing keep away in the yard after playing catch or something else since he doesnt want to go in or whatever. Grab the lead, correct (pinch collar on), then a "heel" or "close", or some other command. He doesnt follow it, another correction, repeat another command, repeat as necessary, with each subsequent correction getting tougher.

Usually only takes one. Depending upon who is working him at the time. he knows he can push around Kyren(12), but they are getting better.

So to answer the question, I rarely look him in the eyes, although I do ensure he is looking to me for approval/guidance. And he knows hes done wrong, so he rarely does the keep away game anymore.
 

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Dominance

It is actually really hard to not be dominant over your own dog. You are physically much larger, much smarter, you control access to the food and to where he can go (doors, leash, etc.). I think a lot of the activities that people interpret as attempts at gaining dominance are really just (like a human teenager) testing their limits. The dog wants to know what is and is not allowed, so they push their limits trying to find out. He is still submissive, and is looking to you for guidance on what is and is not appropriate. What better way to learn than to try and see?

To answer your question about staring, staring usually signals aggression, not dominance, to a dog. When a dog is trying to threaten another dog, they stare at them in the eyes. Hence, it is usually better to say no and then look away.

A good book for this is "The Other End of the Leash" by Patricia McConnell. She explains a lot of dog body languange, and how it differs to from human body language.
 
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