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Discussion Starter #1
I have 3 families waiting for labradoodles who have allergies we need to try to work around. At what age can you reliably have them handle the pup and feel fairly certain that they're having the reaction (or lack of) that will last with that particular dog?

I have Snuggles who is 7 months old and could have them play with to see... but is she old enough not having had her puppy coat shed to really know?

I want to be able to answer this honestly so who ever buys her doesn't regret it.
 

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I dont have a clue, but my thought on this is (and since I have no clue could be way off base) If they meet and play with snuggles and are fine, no reaction - what is to say that they won't have a reaction to another pup since there is no guarantee that another puppy is gonna have the same genetic makeup as Snuggles?
Am I thinking wrong on this one?
 

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Megan, quick question. I'm not being contrary or anything, but I've heard that if you are raised with a dog (or cat or camel) you will be less likely to have allergies to a dog because your immune system has learned to deal with it. And if what you say is true, why do allergy shots train your immune system to tolerate the allergen by injecting the know allergen into your system?

I'm not an expert, just have been through the gamut on the allergy issue.
 

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The one family claims to have one member who had never had a problem with dogs then they got a large very smooth coated dog and he was troubled with hives. The deal is, I don't want my pups passed around like hot potatoes, and while I sympathize and would love to help if I can, I don't want to sacrifice a pups stability to do so.

Guess I'm going to have to do some more research on this. As well as asking the interested parties to talk with their drs so they come to that table educated as well.

Thanks!
 

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I have asthma as does my daughter which is the specific reason I wanted a labradoodle. I grew up from birth on with dogs and my allergy to them progressed as I got older. Not all dogs affect me. My best friends Yorkie, I have absolutely no problems with. I've had labs and shepherds. When it came time to actually get to choose a dog (vs. pound as before) I did alot of research on labradoodles. Ultimately, the best thing to do is have the family around the breeder's home...I did not have that chance and risked it. It has been fabulous and I cuddle with mine with no ill effects, as does my daughter. Saliva is and will continue to be a problem, but it is one that I accept. (DD does not show any problems with the saliva).

I did try dog shots, but IMO, they were pointless.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for the responses.
These people all started out inquiring about the upcoming litters. While I will certainly want to sell those pups, I also offered them to check out the 7 month old thinking it would be easier to tell with her individually as opposed to the pups who will have been licked on by Mom and could be carrying some of her on them.

I'm allergic to cats and my dh has one. So I know a bit from personal experience, but my job in this is to protect the pups future since they can't speak for themselves.
 

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I too have asthma and this was the reason I chose an Australian Multi-Gen. Foster is now 2 and I hadn't had any real issues until about a month ago. I've always washed my hands after he has been licking them.

So I was quite upset when I started having runny eyes and lots of sneezing.

I went to my allergist and re-adjusted some meds and am now doing fine.
I think the reaction I was experiencing was from a combination of a sinus infection and the fact that my sweet boy also doubles as a dust mop.

This is something that I didn't really think about and although his fur never seemed to bother me, the dust he carries around does. Not that my home is overly dusty, mind you. But I think that being in the house during the winter months with the windows closed and the heat ducts forcing the air to move around, my dust mite allergies seemed to kick in.

The fact that I have a 28 pound (he's a miniture) dust mop sitting on my lap and sleeping in my bed doesn't help. But I will gladly take that extra pill so that I can continue enjoy those Saturday morning snuggle sessions.

However, my decision might not be so easy for someone to make for their child. I never liked to give my kids medication they didn't really need. Folks should consider environmental allergies too when they consider getting a dog with a child who has allergies. They might not be allergic to dog fur but they might be allergic to the stuff they roll around in.

Once the dog is part the family I can't imagine how painful it would be for everyone involved including the poor pup to let go.

My advice, wait until the kids are old enough to be able to handle the additional meds or handling issues that will be necessary if they are allergic so that you don't have to break any hearts.
 

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I have very severe allergies but not to all dogs and my son also has allergies and asthma

for us both our f1 LD and f1 GDs HAVE NOT kicked in our allergies at all and my son's asthma is fine even with both fleece and hair coats in our home.

NOTE : when they blow puppy coat though THAT is when our allergies can kick in slightly IF i don't sweep daily and vacuum two times a week
OTHERWISE it's been 1.5years with multiple doodles
doing a OK here!!

dogs we do suffer with badly: german shephards, golden retrievers, pugs, boxers, papillons, etc
I and my son will immediately feel itchy eyes andor like there is sand or grit in them .
then the post nasal drip and inflamed sinuses start up along etc

DOODLES are a blessing for MOST allergy sufferers !!
 
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I don't have allergies but I can say this. My sis is allergic to cats and we had cats growing up and she was never really on meds or anything until her late teenage years (meds was because she was allergic to a lot of things besides cats....mostly environmental stuff). Then she went away to college and away from the cats. After about a year in college she came home one weekend and had to be rushed to the hospital cause she couldn't breathe at all. She was fine after some meds at the hospital but was told that since she hadn't been around the cats for a long time her immunity decreased thus the rxn. Her solution was she went back and got a cat at her house and takes her zyrtec and she is fine.

Tink....as far as letting families do a test with Snuggles...I am not sure that would be the best idea. I think the best idea would be for the family to come when the pup is old enough and have them handle that particular pup (after a bath of course so there is no other pup or mom influence)and see what happens.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Heather, it's snuggles a couple of them are considering, which is why I suggested her.
I'm wondering if they'd have a reliable reaction to her... since she is 7 months old.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
UPDATE:

It's the MAN of the house who has become allergic to his wifes shorthair hunting dog.

So they've asked to come by and take snuggles for a ride in their car so he's in a confined space with her and see how it goes. I agreed to it provided I or someone from my family rides along. (My daughters fiancee has agreed to go)

They seem like very nice people, have a hobby farm with kids, horses, cats, and a pond. Sounds like a great life for a doodle doesn't it?
So I'm hoping he and Snuggles are compatible.

Will keep you posted!
 
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Found this:

Generally speaking, poodles shed less hair and dander, and therefore cause fewer allergy symptoms.
http://allergies.about.com/od/animaland ... er_dog.htm

I had always heard poodles were great for allergic families, that is the whole reason Labs
were bred with poodles in the first place, right?

And this person seems very well informed like Megan about dogs and allergies. I agree with much of what Megan says, but do believe that certain breeds produce less dander and therefore could be termed hypoallergenic (LESS allergen producing, not totally allergen free).

http://answers.google.com/answers/threadview?id=572576

"To be hypoallergenic is to have a decreased tendency to cause
allergies. Hypo means less, not none. Hypoallergenic dog breeds will
still produce allergens, but because of their coat type, will
typically produce less than others. People with severe allergies and
asthma will still be affected by a hypoallergenic dog.

There is no such thing as a non-allergenic dog.

What coat-type makes the difference?

There are two coat types that produce a lesser amount of allergens:
single-coated dogs, who do not have a thick undercoat, and hairless
dogs. However even hairless dogs can produce enough dander to to
affect a highly allergic person."

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This IS the list I'd go with according to the AKC
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/8871707/site/newsweek/

"Basenji, Maltese, bichon frise, Chinese crested, soft-coated wheaten
terrier and poodle, most of which have single-layer coats, which shed
less and do not produce as much dander as longer-haired breeds."
 
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