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O.K., so I am a new dog owner and I read alot of ads for Labrador puppies that have been "dewclawed". Should I have Calvin's removed? What is the harm in them? Why are they removed? Any advice on the subject? Also, while I have your attention....How often do you have your doodles groomed? Leslie
 

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I got Doc's dewclaws removed when I had him neutered at four months old. At that age they are attached like a toe so it is pretty major surgery to remove them. He had stitches and bandages on his legs for ten days. If the breeder has them removed at about 3 days, it's only like clipping some skin and no big deal. I am glad I got Doc's removed because you have to trim the nail on them and the dewclaw can also get caught on things and get torn. They can also scratch people,too. There was a dog at the dog park that had torn it's dewclaw the day before and it opened up and started bleeding again at the dog park. There are lots of dogs that keep them so I think it's a matter of personal choice.
 

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Most labs have them removed because they tend to be a bit larger on labs. Also labs are often used for hunting and run around in the marshes where it would be easy to snag one which is quite painful for the dog.

Many labradoodle breeders de-claw in the first days of life before the dew claws have a change to attach or grow. Many now are not de-clawing because the dew claws tend not to be in the way or very large. Its really a personal decision.

We had Sammy's taken off at time of spay when she was already under anesthesia. That worked very well for us. The reason we chose to take hers off is because she is a hunting dog for us, so much the same reason they often take the labs, to remove them prophelactically is easier than getting one snagged and having it break or tear.

If your dog will be living a normal suburban life, in my opinion, theres no need to remove them.
 

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Hi, you have been given good advice here. It is really a personal decision.

Although the others have removed dew claws on older pups, I would not recommend it unless it is important to do so, as with Kelly where she is training her dog for hunting and the chance of getting them caught is greater.

Once a puppy gets older than 3 days, it becomes a major problem and causes A LOT of bleeding and pain. (I don't care what anyone says, it hurts them!) So, do select a time when the pup will be under anesthesia.

I personally don't remove dew claws. I have seen my dogs using their dew claws, so I believe they serve a purpose. My vet said that back leg dew claws should be removed but front ones are okay to leave. My dogs don't have back ones so I don't worry about them.

Here is a good article supporting NON-removal...you can find a lot of articles saying you should remove them...so it is a personal choice. I don't remove them. http://www.workingdogs.com/doc0019.htm
 

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hi and welcome!
The grooming question is a personal one - we're looking at grooming our poodle moms, in the next month or so, and then their coats get pretty woolly and wild until spring, since Colorado winters have lots of cold and snow. ( :roll: duh!) :D Also, the level of matting you see and how much combing or brushing you want to do would be a factor in your decision. I like to groom puppies more often to help them get accustomed to the grooming process and to help them adjust to the clippers against their body.

As for the dewclaw removal, I agree with the others that it is a personal decision, and it's most ideally made by the breeder, since it is a bigger deal, in a bigger dog. It used to be that removing the dewclaws was almost like a sigh of legitimacy in breeders, vs. backyard breeders. That's not the case anymore. If Calvin still has his, I would suggest talking with your vet about having them removed at neutering. If he has already been neutered, I guess you would have to decide if this is worth a full operation on its own merit.

I have a doodle with front and rear dewclaws and the rear ones are the big hassle. They can curl back into the foot causing a yucky infection. We'll have those removed when we have her spayed at retirement but I'm not going to put her under anesthesia for just the dews, at this time, if I can help it.

A torn dewclaw in an adult dog is an awful, painful event! And since I can easily remedy or prevent that awful event at infancy I have elected to have my vet remove the dews. Personally I wish all breeders removed them from all doodles!

Meanwhile, I do have 2 dogs who still have their dews and I have had no problem with the front dews, thank God. So a ripped dewclaw isn't a given, just not pleasant if they happen.

I hope this helps....
 

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Hi Leslie, I remove the dewclaws on my puppies but, as everyone has mentioned, it is a personal choice.

As for how often to groom your doodle, I think it depends on the generation of doodle you have. The F1's are very easy maintenance and do not require much grooming at all except during the period of "blowing their puppy coats". The F1b's require more brushing to keep their coats looking nice and matt free and the multi-gens, even more.
 

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I forgot to mention the grooming reply but it has been very well answered so I won't say much except to answer Angie...it has been my experience that F2 generation Labradoodles CAN have F1 type coats. My litters usually have 1/3 wooly coats, 1/3 fleece coats, and 1/3 hair coats...so, you get a mix of all three. I find the fleece and wool coats harder to keep groomed. The hair coats don't grow too long, but they do shed so they need brushing (to keep the shedding down) but they don't need to be clipped.
Fleece and curly coats can get matted if not brushed and often you need to clip them, especially in the summer or when they are outdoors a lot.
 
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