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Discussion Starter #1
Annabelle got a new toy today and it wound her up !

Annabelle offering to share her Lion



Devil Child



Devil Child on the Run



Start of the Doodle 500

 

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We call Lucy's doodle 500 "Butt-tucking". Can be frightening, no? Just step aside and get ready to laugh.
 

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I LOVE the glowing "mad dog" eyes look hahahhaaaaa
 

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Bwahahahaha...love the 'one gold eye...one blue eye'....how'd you do that Annabelle???? :shock:
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks - they really look spookie when their eyes glow like that.

I cant believe she was trying to do a 500 at the top of the stairs, she quickly moved to the livingroom - then down the hall to the bed, back down hall to living, repeat, repeat, repeat :lol:
 

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Yippee Annabelle!! The lion would last about 5 minutes with Dakota!!!

I hate to spoil everyone's fun, but here goes!!
Dogs appear to have glowing eyes because the back of their eyeballs include a special reflective layer called the tapetum lucidum. This helps animals see better in low light by working like a mirror on the retina to reflect the light back through the eyes, giving them a second chance to absorb the light. Ever see your dog's eyes "glow" in low light? The colors seem more visible at night because the pupils are dilated wider than during the day, allowing more of the tapetum lucidum to be visible.
This partially explains why when you get your developed photographs back the subjects have glowing spots in their eyes. This is caused by the light from the flash traveling through the pupil and illuminating the blood-cell rich retina at the back of their eyes.

The secret behind so-called "red-eye-reducing cameras" is that they use two quick flashes instead of one. The theory being that the first flash will cause the subject's pupils to restrict and let in less light, while the second will be used for the actual picture.

OK--that's your science lesson for the day!!!
 
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