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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I know Cody is a puppy but my gosh. My friend is in the middle of a divorce and told me she wants to sell her expensive car and get something more reasonable. She came for a visit this weekend. My psycho dog jumped all over her car when we were in the house and judging from the scratches he was standing on her hood and slid off. There are deep scratches all over her car. What the he!! I'm so angry with him. When does "puppy" wear off anyway - he's 6mo. I'm sick of being told that training classes don't start until the spring when it's warm. So now I'll be getting her a new paint job. This is just nuts. I don't remember my lab being like this. How do I traing a dog not to climb on a car when we're in the house anyway? I'm so frustrated.
 

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Hi Angela,

i can understand your frustration! :shock:

I do believe the key to training is supervision. You dog is not supposed to know what is and what isn't allowed, if he's allowed to be outside of your supervision and do whatever he feels like. If you were there to supervise him, you could have corrected him the minute he showed interest in climbing on the car. Right now you may be angry with him, but he has no clue as to why you're angry, because you didn't catch him in the act, so there's no way of correcting him now. I know it's a bit late for this advise right now, but even training classes won't have any effect on this particular issue, it's simply necessary to make sure he's not allowed to be in the garage while you're in the house and let him be. If he cannot be supervised he should be crated or confined to a "dog friendly" room where he can't do any harm.

I'm sorry about your friend's car (and your expense!) and wish you the best of luck!!!

Michael.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I think it's true that you can't leave a puppy unsupervised but.....inside the house he kept jumping on a visiting child. He spends and enjoys a lot of time outside. When he's out there alone (we're very rural and he just hangs around the house) I don't get upset when he digs a plant or chews on a shoe or whatever mischief he gets into. I had a lab once who would chew water hoses into 12in pieces. Those are just spaz, bored dog activities. I do think that I should be able to leave him outside without worrying about him mauling the car! Some things should just not happen. I never thought I would have to train a dog to not climb on a car. Other dogs I've had and other dogs I've known did not do that. I did not disclipline Cody because he would never understand what the problem was. I don't disclipline from anger but for teaching so I just sucked it up. I need help training this 50lb baby. I can't get ANYONE to do that and it's really upsetting. Why does the sun have to be shining for there to be anyone available to help me? I can try to do it on my own but I'm not trained to do that and I'm afraid I'll do it wrong. Let me ask you this too....Due to testicle sympathy, my DH won't let me get Cody neutered. If he were neutered would he be such a spaz?
 

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Angela--these little ones can be so challenging. But I do agree with Michael and I vote to give Cody another chance. And even though puppy training does not help with issues like this, it can start building better discipline and listening skills. I take Dakota to PetsMart for puppy training. They offer classes year-round. I've read some comments that they are over-crowded and the puppies don't get individual attention from the instructor, but in our case this is anything bet true. We have a class of six pups and the instructor knows each of them by name and personality and he spends time with each dog--usually several times--during each session. Best of luck to you and Cody!
Diane
 

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Hi Angela,
I understand your anger and your frustration. I am sorry about this problem.
I don't know what your situation is, financially or logistically, but we took our dogs to a week-long training, where they boarded them and trained them all day for 7 days. They were marvelous when we got them home! BUT...we DID have to keep the training up. And, we are not too disciplined with that...so we have to accept it when the dogs dig or chew...etc. (As you have done.)
The problem seems to me to be that Cody is very smart and he is bored with things quickly. He has the run of what appears to be a perfect home and yard...but he needs to be more mentally challenged. I am not saying that YOU need to do that, only offering it as a possible reason for his behavior.
It may well be that you need to get training beyond the regular puppy classes or obedience classes. Some issues, like the ones you are talking about, need special treatment and someone with the knowledge to handle them.
I completely agree with Michael, and our trainer told us that very thing...if you can't be with them CONSTANTLY, then put them in a safe place. (Crate)
And, to answer your question...6 months is still very much a puppy. My dogs settled down a bit after the first year, but at age 2 are still tearing stuffing out of toys and things.
Yes, I do think that neutering him will help...but you might want to do it before his hormones kick in.
 

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What a bummer! I can just imagine how distressing this must have been. As I've been raising my two doods (8 months old) I've had more than a couple of days when I have wanted to find them a new home.

I agree with Michael and Jac, though, that keeping Cody from getting into trouble in the first place is the solution. My doods have found plenty of trouble to get into outside, too. We also live a rural area where dogs can be shot if they are not confined (lots of sheep). So we have installed a radio fence and we keep the pups confined. As they have gotten older we have extended their space. It took them about a day and a half to get them trained to stay in their space and was affordable, especially compared to installing a fence. But that was just one possible solution.

Eventually you WILL be able to expect that Cody won't scratch a car or jump on a child. In the meantime he's going to get into mischief and you're going to have to think up ways to stay ahead of him.

The paint job is an expensive and frustrating bit of mischief. I'd be mad, too. But I'll bet that Cody is going to be a real peach one day. As frustrated as I've been with my doods from time to time - I am that much more in love with them now. We are all learning together.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I think he is getting bored. When Cody is with the boys they keep him busy and he also likes to chase the cats. The rest of the time he is just getting into mischief. That's one of the reasons we are looking for a re-home doodle. We don't want to do the early puppy training all over again so we want a dog over a year old. It's just really frustrating to me. I looked inot the boarding training people and would actually prefer that method. Because we are so far away the cost does seem extreme at least until we give training with other methods a shot. Please don't get me wrong - Cody is just a dollbaby. We all adore him and he is spoiled. Part of the problem is that he thinks he is still 5lbs. We boarded him the other day and the owner had never seen a dog use his paws like Cody does. He literally uses them as hands to play and manipulate things. He's too smart and I have to lock gates and doors because he knows how to open them. We have a staircase gate and he pulls on it with his paw until the lock jiggles free then he pulls it open. He's a stinker. I would like to say that I will crate him if I'm not right with him but I won't. I don't want to lock Cody up just because I can't watch over him constantly. That's not the rule for indoors. If I'm not right there with him in the house or with the boys then he does go out (or if the boys are out then he comes in). If we can just get through this puppy phase and get some training I think it will be ok. He responds to hand signals for sit, shake and down. I know he's smart - too smart. Such a spaz. And he's 50lbs now with huge feet. He's going to be a giant. We are very conservative with his food and treats so he won't grow too fast. Does anyone know of a doggie "game" other than a treat-filled kong to keep dogs busy? He throws his knotted rope up in the air and chases it but I'm wondering if there isn't something else out there for him to play with.
 

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Hi Angela

So sorry to hear about the car incident. I had a similiar (but less expensive, I hope) incident with Sadie. We took her on vacation with us and she was just a gem - so good in the car and so well behaved in the house we were renting. Except one day when we left her alone in the house. She had been so good not to touch anything that we thought she would be ok, but she chewed a little hole in a carpet in the house. I haven't been given a price on the damage yet. But I feel it was my fault for not putting her in the crate while we were out, so all I can do is suck it up and pay.

These are expensive lessons! But I guess it's only money and I would never consider giving up the dog, especially when we all love her so much. She is a part of the family and makes mistakes just like we do.

I hope things work out for you.
 

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I have never tethered, but for those who have, could this be a good sitation where that could work? It sounds like it might be a good compromise between crating all the time and total freedom.

Jac? Maureen? Di? Anyone else who knows about this topic?
 

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Absolutely Kelly, this would have been a great time to have tethered Cody. Tethering allows you to make the corrections immediately when the action takes place, such as Cody jumping on the visiting child. Cody would not have had to be put outside to be left alone to get into mischief.

Angela, why not try the tethering and see if it helps until you can get him into training. I think you will see you can stop a lot of bad habits before they become a problem :) Also, I would HIGHLY recommend getting him neutered, and quickly :!: :!: A lot of guys have a problem with this for some reason but you and the dog will pay in the end if you don't. Getting a male dog neutered by 6 mos of age will stop all the bad habits of an intact dog such as stubborness, roaming, marking everything in site, humping, etc. Not to mention it is much healthier for Cody to be neutered.
 

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Angela, I can totally relate to what you are saying! I know how smart these dogs are...and I DO believe that they get very bored.
Since you have so much room, have you considered an agility course? That might take some of his energy and focus it toward exercise that will in turn get him worn down a bit. Just an idea.
Also, if his claws are a problem (as in the car incident) you can get those rubber claw covers that I see at PetEdge.
I love the tether idea, but fear that Cody may be too big for that. If he is, it could be dangerous to tether him (if he gets the idea to bolt, you could go flying with him!) But if you feel that you can handle him...you could get a prong collar, a thether and teach him to "down, stay" by putting your foot on the lead, and not letting him go...of course, lots of praise and treats are in order for that...and it is very important that, whenever you train, you release the dog from the command. Otherwise they can't understand...so after he stays for periods (that get longer as you go) then you select a command to release him...we actually use the word "release" as we clap our hands and say the "release" in a very happy voice.
I think that an electric fence for Cody to be placed in an area of the yard might be good...it could keep him out of trouble.
You really do have your work cut out for you, but I believe that Cody is very special and very loved and that the sacrifice will be well worth it!
 

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I like to think I have a "bag of tricks" when it comes to monitoring my pups. 1) There's the crate, of course, but if that won't work for whatever reason, there's tethering. 2) You can tether to yourself, as Jac suggested, you'll probably need a prong collar to keep from experiencing "death by doodle" as an earlier thread described. 3) Additionally, you can tether to a fixed object, like a sofa leg or a heavy table, again, using the prong collar. The prong collar looks fierce, but it isn't. It actually gives you a lot of control without the chance of injuring your pup's throat, the way a regular collar and tether might. 4) As I said before, we love our electric fence, and found it extremely easy to set up. If you're interested in how we set it up without having to bury it, send me a private message and I'll be glad to share our experience with you. 5) We have added an indoor electric transmitter that communicates with the collars the dogs already wear for the outside fence. It cost less than a baby gate and allows all the rest of us (cats, humans) to move freely without an indoor gate.

This is just MY bag of tricks. You will undoubtedly develop your own. Sometimes I think all the effort we make to get our puppies through their puppyhood, is really just stuff to keep US busy while THEY grow up! lol Best of luck to you and Cody (the spaz!).
 

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dang, Angela I'm so sorry!!

I think there's some great ideas here, and NO! there's no sensible reason for waiting any longer for training! If you can't find someplace outdoors, then how about something for indoors? Here in Denver there are several trainers I know of who will come to you for a one-time-session, or whatever you want/need.

Jumping up on people is something I've seen some dogs do more than others, even as puppies. But if Cody is doing it inside he needs to be trained FIRMLY and consistently NOW.

I hope you find someone who will work with you soon.......sigh.
 

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Sorry folks, but I am reading this post, and feel as if I am reading a horror story. I am picking up my pup tomorrow and feel already I have made the worst mistake of my life!!!!!!!!!
I hope to prove you all wrong, and that I will have an angel
 

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Angie... is the dog you got your first dog? Just curious, as I didn't see anything alarming in the post at all. It all seems like par for the course as far as young and undertrained dogs go. They have SO much energy, especially in their teenage years. I run with Molly everyday to have some sanity and time to clean the house after she falls asleep. As everyone said, training and exercise are the keys.
Good luck with your new dog.
 

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Hi Angie, any pup is going to be lots of work no matter the breed they take time and patience. And anyone here that knows me knows that I believe in training it helps you understand the way dogs think (or don't). Some are smarter than others but be patience and start training in the very begining don't wait until they are totally out of control. Hope this helps. :)
 

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No this is not my first dog, I have just recently lost one of two dogs, one in November and the other last August, after 11 years. I have changed breeds so as I would not compare them, but I was beginning to think I had done the wrong thing. My Otto came this evening, and he is the most gorgeous boy, and is so laid back, he is fast asleep in his crate after playing in the garden, at eight weeks, he is unbelievable, and has been chewing his chew toys we had for him.
We hope to have a peaceful night
 
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