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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Darwin was up all night throwing up, until there was nothing left to vomit. We brought him to the vet first thing this morning. They took an X-ray of his chest and abdomen, but nothing showed up. His stool was normal yesterday and today (very little, though). Now, just beginning this a.m., he seems to also be having problems breathing - he has a snoring sound with every breath. He's also not eating, but he is getting enough water to keep from being dehydrated. (either from drinking or ice cubes) Weird gulping sound when he drinks. He's also very lethargic, but seems to be uncomfortable sitting or laying.
Has anyone seen these symptoms?
The vet just said to 'watch' him, and if no improvement, he'll see him again tomorrow morning. It's hard seeing him so sick! But even worse for him...
 

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OH i am so sorry to hear this ....i am saying prayers for you and Darwin this very minute! i will also say an extra special prayer to St Anthony to find the cause and St Francis to watch over him as well.

Please keep us posted
 

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So sorry! Do you think he ate something bad?

I can only relate this in human terms. No doubt he is dehydrated. Keep getting liquids into him. Don't rush him to eat. His tummy is probably very irritated right now. That's why we keep retching and dry heaving even when nothing is left. I'd eventually try some beef or chicken broth and then rice.

Let us know how he is doing.

Deb
 

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This may be a long shot, but did they look at an allergic reaction? Vomiting, difficulty breathing and funny swallowing (because of airway swelling) can be symptoms of an allergic reaction. I'm really not sure but I will pray for your little guy to get better. You must be so worried...
 

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Oh, and Deb is so right, fluids, fluids, fluids!! You might try small sips but very frequently. If you give him large amounts at a time it may just upset his tummy and come back up. But small amounts very frequently will settlel better.
 

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Poor Darwin
I wanted to say the same thing about alergies.
When Denver reacts his throat swells and he has trouble
breathing.
Sending lots of hugs and good wishes your way
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
 

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:cry: ((((((((((((DARWIN)))))))))))) :cry:

We're praying hard for you buddy - get well soon!
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks to everyone for your concern. We just got back from the vet again - 2nd trip today - because Darwin's breathing was getting worse. 3 more x-rays of his airways showed nothing! The dr. is at a loss for a diagnosis, as first it seemed like a GI prob, and now it seems respiratory. He gave him a shot of dexamethasone in case there is some unseen irritation. The poor baby is so unhappy. :(
I don't know if it could be an allergy, he hasn't had anything different to eat, drink or any new materials around the house.
I'll keep you all posted. Thanks again.
 

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I'm so sorry to hear this. I hope Darwin gets well soon.

My Corgi went through something like this a few months ago. They felt he got into something in the yard (like a dead bird, rodent etc) and got some type of intestinal infection from it. They treated it as such and he got better very quickly. The vet asked us a million time if we have free standing water on our property which we don't, but I figured I'd throw that out there to you.

I'll be thinking of you guys and sending healing vibes. (((())))
 

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Prayers,hugs and good thoughts are being sent to you Darwin from your pals here in Connecticut!!!! Please keep us posted on how he's doing!!!
I know there are no bees out in our neck of the woods now...how about a spider bite...I would think he might have a bad reaction to that...a lot of people do...just a thought! Good Luck!!! :wink:
 

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So sorry to hear that Darwin is so sick...I was thinking spider too..a cleaning product or antifreeze, snail bait??? The difficulty breathing seems unusual.

Praying that he feels betting real soon.
 

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do you have any philodendron plants in your house? those are poisionous to kids and dogs

many other plants too can cause allergic and digestive systems
i am just thinking out loud and trying to help
 
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Prayers for you and Darwin. This is long, but it's important you are informed so you can know what to watch for.
You have gotten some good possibilities here. Did the vet rule out bloat? I agree that ingestion of a toxic substance seems a possible culprit. Has he been near any liquid potpourri (very toxic), or avocado or onions or mistletoe? Keep us posted. I am kind of surprised the vet did not keep him. If his breathing gets worse he may need oxygen support so don't hesitate to take him in again, even to an emergency clinic.

Bloat/GDV.
Gastric dilatation volvulus (GDV) or "bloat" is a condition in which the stomach
enlarges with gas and flips/rotates on itself. This results in an increasing amount
of gas that cannot be released from the stomach, respiratory compromise, shock, and
death. Any dog with rapidly increasing abdominal size, respiratory difficulty, and
vomiting or attempted vomiting, should be examined by a veterinarian immediately.

Prevention.
Large breed, deep chested dogs such as Great Danes, Labs, and Akitas are more prone to
bloat. The specific causes of bloat are unknown. However, periods of activity followed
by large meals of dry dog food or the consumption of large quantities of water have been
implicated. Limiting activity around feeding time and feeding smaller, more frequent
meals may help prevent bloat. In dogs prone to bloating, a surgical procedure can be
done to tack the stomach in place, thereby preventing rotation.

Treatment.
Rapid diagnosis and treatment is essential to a successful outcome.
IV fluids, medication for shock, and surgery to relieve the torsion and empty the gas
are necessary for dogs with GDV.


and

Canine Bloat (Gastric Dilatation-Volvulus):
Bloat is a life-threatening condition that pet owners should be trained to recognize so that they can seek immediate medical attention. There are also steps that can help minimize the risk of bloat, especially for breeds that are prone to this type of problem.

What is bloat? Bloat occurs when the stomach becomes severely expanded due to the accumulation of fluids, food, and air in the digestive tract. This often causes the stomach to twist over on itself, effectively shutting down the entrance to and exit from the stomach cavity. This can result in the buildup of toxins in the stomach which can cause stomach rupture and an infection of the stomach cavity. In addition, the twisting of the stomach compresses a major artery and decreases blood flow, causing an irregular heartbeat in many cases. Other internal organs may also be affected as a result of the decreased blood flow. Because these changes can happen so quickly, a case of bloat can result in death in just a few hours.
What causes bloat? It is thought that the following factors may contribute to bloat:

Eating Habits
Exercise
Stress
Heredity
Disposition

How can you recognize that bloat is occurring? The following can be signs of bloat, but don't waste too much time doing a self-diagnosis. It is much better to be safe than sorry. If you suspect bloat, take your dog to a veterinarian immediately.

Distended, gas-filled stomach
Attempts to vomit without success
Whining
Salivation
Difficult breathing
Rapid heartbeat
Signs of shock
Pale gums
Shallow rapid breathing
Cold skin
Weakness
Fast pulse
Loss of consciousness

How can you help minimize the risk of bloat? The following measure can at least help minimize the risk of bloat, although they will not remove the risk entirely, since some of the factors are genetic/hereditary.

Feed your dog several small meals a day rather than one or two large meals. Mix your dog's dry food with water so that the expansion occurs prior to eating.
Teach your dog to eat slowly. For families with multiple dogs, feed them in separate rooms so that they don't feel the need to eat quickly.
Keep your dog from vigorous exercise one hour before and two hours after eating.
Don't allow your dog to drink large amounts of water before and after eating.
Avoid feeding "people food" or table scraps that may upset your dog's digestive system.
Know your dog's normal behavior, so that you can quickly recognize if there is a problem.
Keep the location, hours, and phone numbers of veterinary clinic handy in case of an emergency. Also, check before there is a problem to see if your veterinarian will need to refer you to a specialty practice or veterinary school hospital that specializes in treating cases of severe bloat.

What breeds are prone to bloat? Although any dog can be affected by bloat, it most often occurs in deep-chested, large and giant breeds between the ages of 4 and 10 years old.

Great Dane
German Shepherd
Standard Poodle
Rottweiler
Akita
Bloodhound
Irish Setter
Golden Retriever
Irish Wolfhound
Labrador
Newfoundland

The following small/mid-sized breeds may also be prone to bloat:
Dachshund
Basset Hound
Airedale Terrier

What do you do if you suspect your dog has bloat? Take your dog to a veterinarian immediately.
What is the treatment for bloat? The series of steps the veterinarian may perform for diagnosing and treating bloat are as follows:

Diagnose bloat through physical exam, X-Ray, and/or EKG.
Evaluate and treat the patient for shock by administering fluids and/or antibiotics/corticosteroids.
Decompress the dog's stomach through a tube down the esophagus or through a large bore needle through the dog's side.
If this does not resolve the bloat, surgery may be needed to decompress and untwist the dog's stomach.

 

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curious did he get sick after eating the spaghetti?
 
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