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My two 5 month old dogs go crazy when anyone walks in the door. Jumping on them, Barking loudly, running around all over the place. And they are pretty big now so when they jump up they knock some people over. Some of my friends are absolutely terrified of them. I tried to tell them that they are just exicted and not about to go for their necks but i do understand if i saw two huge dogs acting like mad dogs,barking their head off I would be scared too. I try my best to get them to sit but they would listen. I don't want to put them in their crate because that wouldn't solve the problem. HELP :(
 

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Good morning...this is a common, but very unwanted problem...I know because I have 5 dogs at home and they tend to get overly excited when people come to the door too.

I have been working on the command "settle!"

One day, when I was really frustrated with all of them going nutso over a visitor, I grabbed the collar of the two worst offenders and held them tightly and looked them in the eye (very closely) and said "settle!" then I kept a hold of them while repeating the command, more and more gently and as they quieted down, I gently said, "good settle" and kept saying it until I could actually let go of the collar and pet them...I kept saying good settle...and it worked!

So, what you might want to do is to get help...have someone in your family be with you and your dogs and ask someone to come to the door...when the activity starts, do what I mentioned above...including treats would be good too.

Ask the visitor to also calmly say, settle, and to give treats.

But under no circumstances if the dogs get out of control do they get a treat or attention.

Another tactic that worked well for us was to post a note on our front door...it said, "Please be patient, we are trying to train our dogs so give us time to come to the door. When we open the door, do NOT speak to the dogs, do NOT look at the dogs, and try to keep your voice calm. Thank you for helping us teach our beloved pets how to behave."
Then...I always put a leash on the dogs and when the people came in, I commanded the dogs to sit or down...and as I visited with the people, soon the dogs lost their excitement...and when they didn't notice, I took the leash off. It worked really well.

Good luck...you just have to try things and find what works for you.

But the thing that gets the dogs excited is that people always greet you at the door with happy voices and laughter and usually come in with "hello! what a cute dog!" and lots of attention...if the dogs don't get that attention and they don't hear the happy voices and laughter, they learn to not react.

Another really good thing to teach is "go to your spot" and "stay in your spot"...these are PERFECT commands for every situation...don't use a blanket or rug as the spot...just point and let them know that wherever you point is the "spot"...that way you can use it anywhere...even at the vet office!
 

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Good advice Jac, I'm going to try these on Archie. He just loves everybody and when we have company, he is just beside himself and goes crazy.
 

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an afternoon of bell ringing can help!

Our Dulcie was just the same but has got better as she has got older (although she does try to revert to type now and again!). We heard a good tip that helped which was to try 'flooding'. This is where you keep ringing the bell or knocking on the door, opening it and showing her that theres nothing there to be excited about. This also works if you have some 'volunters' to help, someone who will knock and ignore the dog properly until she behaves int he correct manner. We had tried the tin of coins, and other things like that but found that this helped alot in the beginning when things were really bad. This is not to be confused with some forms of floooding where the dog isn't allowed to leave a situation in which they are uncomfortable. We now say DOWN if she goes up to people and then only let them pat her once she is settled. After that all the kids are able to run around with her without fear of being knocked over. Hope that helps
 

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We also had this problem until I read the Dog Whisperers Book. Ceasar (my new best friend) recommends what Jac said. We started by ignoring her (no speaking, no eye contact) when we came in, until she was calm -the she gets affection. This is very very hard to do, but it was effective the first time out! When guest come, we make her sit before we open the door, and ask our guest to use the same method. She is 9 months old now, and does really well, provided I can get our guest to comply....
 

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I have actually found the pen to be very effective (as long as it's not percieved as punishment). When a guest arrives and Dakota is excited (always), he is given the pen command. After a couple of minutes in his pen, he settles to a model pup :roll: and I can release him. I do like the "go to your spot" idea. I once had a Springer and Lab and I used a "places" command with them. It worked fine, but each knew where his "place" was so it was only effective on a limited basis.
Diane (and Dakota)
 
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