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I've gotten in the habit of allowing Libby to jump up at the patio door when she's outside and ready to come back in the house. When she was tiny, it was cute of course and this being my first dog, I didn't think about what would happen down the line. Libby is also a regular pogo dog! She jumps all the time! Now that spring is coming I've realized that patio door will soon be nothing but a thin screen. One jump up on it and that's the end of the screen door!
Any ideas how i can stop her from jumping up? I've tried to just ignore her and only let her in when she is calm but it takes awhile for that to happen most days. Any suggestions?
 

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doodleallday said:
Any suggestions?
I'll probably take some flak, but I've got my body armor on...

My stepdaughter's significant other is an experienced owner of hunting dogs, specifically Pointers. His family raised them and used them for bird hunting for generations. Their young Pointer pup was a jumper and went psycho whenever anyone visited the house. He had the same behavior you are describing. They used a "shock collar" on this wild boy and now approaching one year old, he is a well trained, relaxed, obedient young dog. He doesn't jump or claw at the door and he can be trusted to walk or jog with you on the sidewalk off leash. It's an amazing transformation and I'm considering using "the collar" to sidewalk train Ozzie.

OK... lemme have it, guys!
 

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No, I am not opposed to a training collar...they can be very effective in the right hands.

Tanner demolished our screens last year, this year, while we are trying to sell our house, we will put grates over the screens.
 

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I would start with saying in a stern voice "no, down" and walking away. Then letting her in when you see her sit calmly by the door. I don't have any experience so I am not for sure that this would work but it would be my first try.

As for the e-collar, I don't think they are evil but I would wait to use as a last ditch thing.
 

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just wanted to pitch in about the e-collars for training. i think in the right hands they can be an invaluable training tool. there are just some behaviors (like 100% off-leash recall for instance, and other behaviors where you don't have direct physical control over your dog) that cannot be reliably trained any other way.

i caution anyone thinking of trying this method to seek the help of a professional trainer. the key thing is to make sure when the collar is delivering a correction, it is timed so that the dog knows what the correction is for, and what the appropriate behavior should be. the last thing you want is to be giving your dog repeated electric shocks, for reasons it doesn't understand. then it becomes less of a teaching moment, and more like torture. imagine receiving shocks seemingly randomly and not knowing what was expected of you to make it stop!

i would probably try positive reinforcement methods first, before going with the e-collar + professional help. it might require going outside with your dog for a while. i really like sessa's suggestion of training a different signal -- in that case timing would be essential, and you'd need to be outside with the dog so you could reward the correct behavior at just the right time.

-em
 

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I use an e-collar with my golden. Thinking about using it with my doodle. They only shock if you crank it up and I have only done this when I want to emphasize a potential life and death or potential injury situation:like running toward a street or avoiding other dogs when they look agressive.
 
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I use an e-collar for Bella. Saved my sanity, saved our marriage and saved Bella from being returned to the shelter :lol:
 

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I'll also chime in on the use of the e-collar. Our trainer strongly recommended it and we received training on the use of it before using it on Bigsby. And I've never needed to "crank it up" to the shock stage. The lower settings simply give a vibration - and that's enough for Bigsby to stop what he's doing and redirect his attention. We actually use it very seldom - and it's funny how his behavior improves just from having the collar on, without ever having to give a correction. I would only purchase the type that has the lower vibration setting, and would only use it after receiving training. It's not cheap - the collar cost almost $200 plus the training costs (which we were going to do anyway). It is definitely very effective - and they learn very quickly with it.

One example - Bigsby was an avid counter surfer. He destroyed numerous pot holders, dish towels, and sponges (he's a fabric eater). I waited for weeks trying to catch him exactly in the act of jumping up (the key to the e-collar is timing) - but, no matter how quiet I was or how stealthily I sneaked around the corner, he would always know when I was there and I could never time it just right. Until one evening, he didn't know I was there, and as he went up - ZAP - got him once. No yelping or pain. He just immediately put both feet back on the ground. And, you know what? He has never jumped up to get anything off the counter ever again. Not once. Amazing.
 
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