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Hello, I'm getting ready to put a deposit on a multigen pup with a fleece/wool coat. Given that my family has allergies, I want to minimize any allergy problems in the future. I know there are no guarantees.

My question is...given a choice between multigen labradoodle and Australian labradoodle, would there be a difference in the allergy factor?

Thanks for any advice you can offer!
 

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I'm interested to see the replies to this one. My guess is that's there's no definitive answer.

Australian labradoodles are supposed to be specifically bred to be allergy friendly, but I don't think there are any guarantees (as you know). Also, I'd be shocked if anyone had actually done some sort of scientific study on any of the labradoodle types.

My guess: A dog with more of a wool-type coat might be a safer bet. You might get your most informative answers from the breeders in the forum.

Good luck,
 

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I doubt many breeders breed both so it may be a tough comparison.

Our dog is an Australian labradoodle. He is very curly. He has basically a poodle coat but it is silky soft. He does not shed at all.

Deb
 

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After a lot of research, both before and after getting my pup, the two breeds are quite similar, and also very different at the same time. My pup is Australian Labradoodle. However, he has a lot of poodle in his heritage. The major difference between Australian Labradoodle and an American Labradoodle is that the Australian Labradoodles have been infused with Irish Water Spaniels, American and English Cocker Spaniels, and just recently Irish Soft Coated Wheaton. American Multigenerational pups only have Labrador and Poodle in their heritage.

Most Australian Labradoodles have at least Water Spaniel in them, as it was the first infusion done. They're a close relative to Poodles, with the same allergenic coat. The Cocker Spaniels have been brought in to bring the size down on the Labradoodles. The Wheaton has just recently brought in to correct the wool coat of past pups, and you can only get this infusion from Australia.

That being said, I've learned that it is very important to look at the pedigree of the pup you're interested in purchasing. Do some research, and figure out exactly what you are comfortable with. How much poodle, how much lab, and if you would like other breeds in your pup. For a better description of the other breeds put into the labradoodle, you should go to this website: Infusions. It's from the cofounder of Australian Labradoodles. It's very informative, and explains exactly why she's put other breeds into the Australian Labradoodle. It is controversial over here in America. Even among those breeding "Australian Labradoodles". This is something I didn't know prior to getting my pup. I've since learned that you just need to make sure you know what you're looking for, and you find a breeder you trust. And don't go on the fact that every multigen is like the other. That's the biggest mistake I made. I thought that all Australian Labradoodles were being bred equally. But many Australian Labradoodle breeders have their own beliefs on what they're breeding towards, which is why you need to make sure that what they're breeding towards is what you're looking for. But this is the same thing you need to look for, regardless of what generation you are looking for.

I love my pup. He's got the best Lab personality, but he inherited all the poor poodle habits- finicky eating, finicky tummy, etc. I also didn't want cocker spaniel in my pup, and he does have Irish Water Spaniel in him. However, that infusion was 7 or 8 generations ago. So, you can do your own research and decide what exactly you want out of your pup.

But, back to your original question, both multi-gens should suit your purpose. You should have a pup that has a more poodle coat- which your breeder should be able to identify.

The other thing you want to be careful of is what exactly is being called a "multigen." Some breeders call mixes that are really not technically a "multigen" a "multi-gen", for example an F1 being bred to a multigen is technically a F2, not a multigen.

Buying a puppy involves a lot of research, especially if you need specific things from the pup. So, I congratulate you on doing your research, and I hope this was helpful.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
new doodle

Thanks for your helpful advice! I'm finding that making an educated decision is a little complicated, especially with learning all about the genetics.

Often I see the advice that Temperment is the most important thing to consider, more than coat type or size or pedigree.

So I wonder, if puppies are purchased at age 8-10 weeks, and most if not all breeders do not let you see the puppy until after you have purchased it, how does a breeder gauge temperment--are we just talking about a tendency to be active or passive, friendly or fearful, physically active or more sedentary?

Thanks to all of you with experience! This is my first time ever shopping for a dog!

:)
 
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My breeder would post pics of the pups along with a breif description of their personality. Maya was classified as happy go lucky. I asked what that meant and the breeder said pretty easy going a little hyper at times. Well that is Maya in a nut shell. Tell your breeder what kind of activites you will be doing with your dog if there are children in your household and their ages. The more info you give your breeder about you and your perfect dog the better they will be able to give you suggestions on which pup(s) in the litter would best fit your lifestyle.
 

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When I searched for Napa, my pup, I told the breeder I wanted a pup that I could train to be a Therapy dog. This worked out wonderful for us. Napa is calm, people friendly, people oriented, and loves to be with people more than other dogs.

When I began my search, I didn't really understand the importance of temperament until I found a breeder who let me meet his pups. It was then that I realized the difference in the temperaments. I decided at that moment that I needed to make sure that which ever breeder I went with, I explained to them exactly what I wanted. We wanted a mellow pup, that we could possibly take into places as a therapy dog. And we made sure we expressed that. Although, Napa was a bit older, he was about 9-10 weeks by the time we actually put our name down for him, from what I witnessed at the breeder I visited, a breeder can tell (if they've been breeding for a bit) what the temperament will be. Also, some breeders actually bring in temperament testers to figure out the temperament.

But, you're right when you say that although you want to make an educated decision, all of this stuff is very confusing. Feel free to ask questions. There are many here who are very knowledgeable in most areas, and if they're not, then they find articles to look at.

The genetics is definitely interesting, especially among dogs. But the generations can even confuse those of us who have done alot of research.

Best of luck!
 

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hi Jody,
I think that as a breeder I'm seeing your questions a little differently. But welcome!! I hope you will search around the 1000's of posts on this forum for various topics and answers to most people's questions.

I breed F1b Labradoodles, which are generally 75% Poodle, 25% Lab, altho that does vary within a litter. Breeding this generation is a great way to know that most of the puppies in our litters will be allergy-friendly. And I don't think there is a 'grade' of allergy friendliness, altho there is a variety of factors that can cause allergic reactions. For the sake of general discussion, there is typically either a reaction to the enzymes in saliva, which is not breed-specific, but dog-specific, or more commonly, a search for a dog that doesn't shed hair or dander.

The F1b generation is sort of the foundation of later generations, in North American Labradoodles (Retriever/Poodle only) I have F1b and F3 Doodles with identical coats, so once we get to where we have F1b, or F1b xF1b litters, the coats are fairly consistent.

If I were your breeder I would be talking to you and letting YOU choose your puppy. I would be talking to you about the nature, personalities, and interactions of the puppies in the litter, so that it was YOUR choice, not mine, but maybe I'm sort of old-fashioned about it.

Also, if your breeder has been raising Labradoodles they should be the key to your knowing the coat texture that is most likely to be allergy-friendly, more so than the Australian vs. American mixtures, since there are shedding puppies in both columns. So I believe that finding the breeder you trust and want to work with, is the key to finding the puppy you want to raise and love its whole life.

I hope this helps!! There are several fine breeders in your region, so I hope you find one you are comfortable with, for whatever generation or hybrid you choose. :D
 

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JODY we have severe allergies in my family along with my one son having bad asthma

we have 1 F1 labradoodle that does shed minimally
and 2 f1 goldendoodles that are NONSHEDDING

to-date we're fine in the past 15mos with no allergies being kicked in
HOWEVER a f1b labradoodle may be a better bet for very low to Nonshedding qualities and more allergy friendly perhaps

Goldendoodles are like inbetween a f1 labradoodle but not quite a f1b ld
the black guy Max is a f1 ld and the cream and red ones (in avitar pic) are my goldendoodles

i do NOT know about australian multigens as i do not have one

note: the curlier the doodle, the more they can matt and need possibly more grooming
 

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As others have said, a decent breeder has spent enough time working with their pups that they should know which ones are more mellow and have what personality traits. On my site I too try to post photos of individual pups and what they're like. I find that my buyers have appreciated this and it helps them to give me a much better idea of what kind of dog they are really looking for.

Find a breeder you're comfortable with and confident in and you should be fine. It's great that you're asking your questions ahead and are making an informed decision.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
choosing a pup

Thanks--just wanted to update you that I sent in my deposit/application for a little guy just born 1/4/08. Should be taking him home in early March. Can't wait!!!
 

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Congrats Jody...I can't wait to see what you get!

I know I'm late on my post and Jody already has a pup, etc. but I thought I would comment anyway.

Maybe I'm misunderstanding Jody's original question of a multi gen Labradoodle vs. Australian Labradoodle, however, I thought it should be noted that an Australian Labradoodle IS a multi-gen and usually (I say USUALLY) at that level, most are allergy friendly/non to mim shedding, regardless if they are American or Aust. lines. And I know we all know that there is always the puppy or puppies in a litter that are the exception.

Anyhow, I'm excited for you Jody and you'll have to post some pictures!
 
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