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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
While we're hot on contaminated food, here's another angle we hadn't realized, direct from www.mercola.com, who claims that 70% of the chickens raised in the US are fed a substance called Roxarsone, which contains arsenic. This substance passes through the chickens and contaminates our land, in addition to our consuming it in contaminated chickens.

Follow this link to yet another toxin in our human food chain!

http://v.mercola.com/blogs/public_blog/ ... 10528.aspx
 

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I don't know why I am always tired and run down...do you doc? :?

I worry about the children...

Let's see, they eat chicken (nuggets, usually), pork (hotdogs?), grain and gluten in a zillion of their favorites from breakfast foods to cookies...they eat pesticides, growth hormones, toxins...artificially enhanced flavors, fats that don't breakdown, and gallons of sugar.

Honestly, guys, I am not a granola nut...I always chided my friends who gave me a bad time about not paying more for organic products...but believe me, I am starting to see the light!
 

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WOW makes me wish i could win the lotto and go back to life on Harkers Island in North carolina living like i did when i was a kid. Slaughtered our own pigs, grew our own fruits and veggies...some one always had cows too...I had to dodge the rooster every damn morning to get eggs for our breakfast. and we used compost on all gardens. didn't pull onions and so on till needed for that dinner. Fished and ate what we caught.
we also made homemade icecream

OK i can't stand buttermilk to this day hahhaha and my dad grew up making his own butter too!
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Don't forget the addition of high fructose corn syrup to just about Everything that's processed.

Funniest thing, the obesity epidemic in the US began about the same time that this additive became common ....

My friend, who is quite the health nut, was stunned to hear that her beloved CostCo hot roasted chicken has sugar. Read the Labels, everyone...!

Right on, Jac, there is increasing merit to home cooked from scratch, using local organic products.
 

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I'm not so worried about Annie... Its me! I'm the one that eats all the crap because I'm always on the run. Annie eats better than most nutritionists. She's been like that since she was a baby - prefers fruits & veggies over junk. When she gets home from school she usually wants a rice cake & an apple. She doesn't drink any juice, but she goes through 5-6 16oz bottles of water per day. She prefers real meat to pressed nuggets. She loves sushi. For her, dinner is appetizer sized, and her meal is a salad.

Very very odd little girl she is.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
... Annie eats better than most nutritionists. She's been like that since she was a baby - prefers fruits & veggies over junk. When she gets home from school she usually wants a rice cake & an apple. She doesn't drink any juice, but she goes through 5-6 16oz bottles of water per day. She prefers real meat to pressed nuggets. She loves sushi. For her, dinner is appetizer sized, and her meal is a salad.

Very very odd little girl she is.
Oh, but what a healthy girl!!! If I hang out around her for a couple of days (just kidding), do you suppose it will rub off? I am green with envy, that it is so natural for her to do what's right. I wish I found it so easy.

Congratulations on rearing a girl who knows how to take care of herself!
 

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We're organic gardeners, too, but I wasn't bothering much about what I bought at the supermarket until I read Consumer Report's latest take on organics. They have a list of of what's okay and what's not okay to buy. I think what's especially important if you have young kids is organic milk, because it doesn't have the hormones. And I stopped buying non-organic beef. We eat a lot of deer meat instead. Here's an email I sent to some friends:

*******

10 Fruits And Vegetables To Buy Organic

Peaches

Summer's blushing fruit contains high residues of iprodione, classified as a probable human carcinogen by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and methyl parathion, an endocrine disruptor and organophosphate (OP) insecticide. Methyl parathion has caused massive kills of bees and birds. According to Consumer Reports, single servings of peaches "consistently exceeded" EPA's safe daily limit for a 44-pound child.

Apples

Apples may contain methyl parathion. Both fresh apples and baby food applesauce can also contain chlorpyrifos, an OP which has caused large bird kills. CORE Values IPM apple growers are trying to phase out OPs.

Pears

Pears, both fresh and in baby food, can also come with methyl parathion, as well as the OP azinphos-methyl, which is toxic to freshwater fish, amphibians and bees.

Winter Squash

Dieldrin, a chlorinated, carcinogenic insecticide, exceeded the safe daily limit for a young child in two-thirds of positive samples. Another potent carcinogen, heptachlor, also showed up. DDT and its breakdown product, DDE, were detected in baby food squash.

Green Beans

Green Beans can contain acephate, methamidophos and dimethoate (three neurotoxic OPs), and endosulfan, an endocrine-disrupting insecticide, which showed up in baby food, too. Acephate disorients migrating birds, throwing them off course.

Grapes

U.S. grapes contain methyl parathion and methomyl, a carbamate insecticide listed as an endocrine disruptor; imports may contain dimethoate.

Strawberries

The enhanced red color of strawberries comes from the fungicide captan, a probable human carcinogen that can irritate skin and eyes, and is highly toxic to fish. While the lethal soil fumigant methyl bromide doesn't show up on the fruit, it has harmed California farm workers, and depletes the ozone layer.

Raspberries

Watch out for more than thorns! These berries can contain captan, iprodione and carbaryl, a suspected endocrine disruptor that has also been found in plum baby food

Spinach

Permethrin, a possible human carcinogen, and dimethoate dominate spinach's toxicity ratings, but CU notes that residue levels have been declining as U.S. farmers reduce use of these insecticides. DDT has been found in spinach, which leads all foods in exceeding safety tolerances.

Potatoes

Pesticide use on potatoes is growing, CU warns. They may contain dieldrin and methamidophos, and children eating potatoes risk getting a very high dose of aldicarb, CU says.

Plus 2 more:

Consumers Union announced two more foods high in chlorpyrifos or other pesticide residues: tomatoes and cantaloupe

*****

This is what I take to the supermarket with me:

DIRTY DOZEN - Buy These Organic
Peaches
Apples
Sweet Bell Peppers
Celery
Nectarines
Strawberries
Cherries
Pears
Grapes (Imported)
Spinach
Lettuce
Potatoes

CLEANEST 12 - Lowest in Pesticides
Onions
Avocado
Sweet Corn (Frozen)
Pineapples
Mango
Asparagus
Sweet Peas (Frozen)
Kiwi Fruit
Bananas
Cabbage
Broccoli
Papaya

Why Should You Care About Pesticides?
There is growing consensus in the scientific community that small
doses of pesticides and other chemicals can adversely affect people,
especially during vulnerable periods of fetal development and child-
hood when exposures can have long lasting effects. Because the toxic
effects of pesticides are worrisome, not well understood, or in some
cases completely unstudied, shoppers are wise to minimize exposure to
pesticides whenever possible.
What's the Difference?
An EWG simulation of thousands of consumers eating high and low
pesticide diets shows that people can lower their pesticide exposure
by almost 90 percent by avoiding the top twelve most contaminated
fruits and vegetables and eating the least contaminated instead. Eating
the 12 most contaminated fruits and vegetables will expose a person to
about 15 pesticides per day, on average. Eating the 12 least contaminat-
ed will expose a person to less than 2 pesticides per day. Less dramatic
comparisons will produce less dramatic reductions, but without doubt
using the Guide provides people with a way to make choices that lower
pesticide exposure in the diet.
Will Washing and Peeling Help?
Nearly all of the data used to create these lists already considers how
people typically wash and prepare produce (for example, apples are
washed before testing, bananas are peeled). While washing and rinsing
fresh produce may reduce levels of some pesticides, it does not elimi-
nate them. Peeling also reduces exposures, but valuable nutrients often
go down the drain with the peel. The best option is to eat a varied diet,
wash all produce, and choose organic when possible to reduce expo-
sure to potentially harmful chemicals.
How Was This Guide Developed?
The produce ranking was developed by analysts at the not-for-profit
Environmental Working Group (EWG) based on the results of nearly
43,000 tests for pesticides on produce collected by the U.S. Department
of Agriculture and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration between
2000 and 2004. A detailed description of the criteria used in developing
the rankings as well as a full list of fresh fruits and vegetables that have
been tested is available at www.foodnews.org.
GET YOUR OWN GUIDE
Download a copy or get more information:
http://www.foodnews.org
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
River Rat, I'm glad you posted this. It's a good, quick synopsis of what is safe on our supermarket shelves. Interesting that with these small changes we can eliminate 90 of the pesticides.

One item on the safe list that would still concern me, in spite of the low pesticide presence, would be the corn, since about 70% of the corn grown in the US is now GMO (genetically modified).

I am glad to see the scientific community expressing concern over ingesting so many toxic chemicals. Our bodies were made to process the amount of environmental toxins present on Earth thousands of years, ago, not the morass in which most of us unwittingly live today. Even the health nuts aquire toxins from the atmosphere, plastic containers, rubber tires, chlorinated water ... ad infinitum. Our liver and kidney are not meant to process all of the extra junk that comes our way on a daily basis, which IMO puts undue stress on our bodies.
 

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Deb, I know what you mean about corn but is that true even of the corn one can buy at a local farm stand? Also the articles don't address meat and dairy products. I'm concerned about the antibiotics and hormones in milk, but found that imported cheeses don't have hormones because Europe doesn't permit their use. I wonder why they have so much more sense than we do.

I agree with you completely; we evolved in a different world eating non-adulterated foods and not being exposed to the chemical soup that's all around us now. There's only so much one can do to stay safe, but it's probably worth making some effort. I was impressed that Consumer Report weighed in for organic food; I seem to recall years ago that its stance was that there was no proof that there was any advantage, and it was certainly costlier. I may be thinking of some other "authority," though.

I had a kid on the Feingold diet many years ago, so I got to be an expert at reading labels. So much isn't listed these days that I'd like to know about, though.

Leslie
 

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In today's times where many do not live on farms nor maybe have their own gardens , and/or slaughter their own animals to eat . Well we are limited to reading labels, washing our food thoroughly, check expiration dates buy organic when we can.

I mean i lived where the 1st $26million dollar PCP Superfund cleanup happened. Talk about scary then again we all have PCP's in our body and yes they are carcinogetic.

My point: try your best to stay informed and make the best decisions you can. for me during the summer i grown my own pesticide free veggies, onions, garlic and more. I try to buy from local farmers too that do the same. I wash all veggies even chicken. When i can i have been known to get farm raised turkeys and such for meals. OKAY i even get food from hunters at times.

One thing i do not do is eat any fish from any of the great lakes here!

I also took the pesticide licensing course in 1995 along with the Master Gardener course. I also was on the Board for Cornell university coop in 1996. I never took the licensing test as i took the course to Learn WHY i would NOT used pesiticides and learn what isn't published for us to readily see.

Today's times makes it hard for us to eat really naturally and healthy.
 

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We've been organic farmers/gardeners since we were married, in the late 60's. We used to raise sheep and goats, too, and while we didn't feed them organic grain they ate our grass, which wasn't sprayed, much of the time. I used to make my own cheese from the goat's milk. But it's very labor-intensive and we finally cut back and just have chickens and geese now. Again we don't feed them organic grain but do make sure that the feed has no antibiotics or other additives, although who knows, with the latest scare about Chinese supplements, what's really in the food stream.

By the way, saw that you and your husband are art dealers, Sessa. Funny - I'm an artist; mostly portraits but sometimes landscapes, and I have some figurative and scenic paintings from a recent trip to France. This is quite a varied group, I've noticed!

We're getting a puppy from Maureen in June, and then I'll really be a full-fledged member!

Leslie
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Deb, I know what you mean about corn but is that true even of the corn one can buy at a local farm stand? Also the articles don't address meat and dairy products. I'm concerned about the antibiotics and hormones in milk, but found that imported cheeses don't have hormones because Europe doesn't permit their use. I wonder why they have so much more sense than we do.

I agree with you completely; we evolved in a different world eating non-adulterated foods and not being exposed to the chemical soup that's all around us now. There's only so much one can do to stay safe, but it's probably worth making some effort. I was impressed that Consumer Report weighed in for organic food; I seem to recall years ago that its stance was that there was no proof that there was any advantage, and it was certainly costlier. I may be thinking of some other "authority," though.

I had a kid on the Feingold diet many years ago, so I got to be an expert at reading labels. So much isn't listed these days that I'd like to know about, though.
As for the corn from a local stand, it would depend on what he used as seed corn. Did he make sure to purchase only organic seed that was not from genetically modified corn? Is his field downwind of a GMO field? Was the seed corn grown on a field downwind from a GMO field? One problem with GMO food is that the wind and bees carry pollen from the GMO field to the natural field, and alters the natural field as well. It's a process which could be very difficult to contain.

Interesting that you mention Europe. Do you notice how much rich food and cream the French eat, without our heart disease or obesity problems? Granted, the Parisians walk it off, but still there is a disparity between the diets, and they get away with eating what we are told will make us sick. A friend who has a condo is Paris is convinced that the difference is in the fact that Europeans eat whole foods and do not allow the additives, processed and genetically modified foods that have found their way into the American diet. I'm all for the European concern for natural, whole foods. I only wish we would awaken to the issues here.

Yes, Wonderful that the big media (Consumer Report) finally see that organic is important. Trouble is, with increasing demand, and pressure once again from Big Business (Where will WalMart take us on this one?), the word organic is slowly being diluted as the gold standard of selecting healthy foods.

Labeling is also an issue. The law requiring labeling, though a well-intentioned concept, dumbed down the information provided in its standardized label. It is far too easy to hide dangerous chemicals to which some people react strongly. An example of this is MSG, which can be listed under "Spices" or numerous other headings, without ever having to admit its presence in the product. Also, a "serving" containing less than a gram (?) of something like fat or sugar can be touted as Fat Free or Sugar Free, when in fact, when one eats a "Realistic" serving, they are indeed consuming the substance, sometimes in quantities that could hurt them, in the case of a diabetic innocently ingesting sugar.

You are so fortunate to be able to farm organically.
 

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I share your concerns about labeling; even products which note that they don't add specific hormones, such as some nonorganic milk brands, apparently have to include a disclaimer that there are no documented health benefits from foods which avoid that substance. And I've listened to debates on NPR about whether or not GMO (or cloned, for that matter) foods should be forced to have disclosures on labels. Seems to me that if the food industry is worried about it they're acknowledging on some level that there would be resistance. Maybe all this brouhaha over China will bring some new thinking to the question of foods and additives? But that's probably too much to hope.

I'm not sure that the French are going to maintain their advantage, since portions are growing larger and despite resistance there's been some Americanization of the food supply. I do love those croissants and patés, though! Along those lines, here's a link to some of my French paintings

http://leslieficcaglia.org/labellefrance.htm

and to my latest painting of my granddaughter helping us band endangered shorebirds

http://leslieficcaglia.org/redknot.htm

We're probably going to be getting our puppy in mid-June, since I scheduled a painting trip to Maine with some other artists before I knew that we would be needing an addition to the family! So Maureen is going to keep the puppy an extra week or two for me. She's going to be a black female, but since there are several likely candidates I'm not sure yet which one. I would like a Benjy look but temperament's the most important consideration. I was glad to hear that some of your doodles work well as watch dogs because a friend who has labs said that they're hopeless as guardians of the castle and didn't think a doodle would be much good at alerting me to visitors. Not sure about the protection factor, though.

Leslie
 

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way back when the dentists realized sugar caused cavities millions of dollars were spent to suppress the danger of sugar (all forms) because without sugar the dentists livlihood would not have prospered how it is. Sugar creates obesity, hypertension and has been linked to many more diseases including adhd.

google it.

while your there google aspertame or sucralose pure poison - which stinks cause I like an occasional diet soda but with this pregnancy I wanted to have a diet mountain dew so I looked it up online and came across so much stuff I will now drink a half of glass of tea if I need to.

and this pregnancy chicken has repulsed me. now I know why.

oh and apple juice for children I heard a long time ago was full of pesticides when not organic so beware of fruit juice non organic.

have a great dinner tonight! :shock: :? 8)
 

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When I took our granddaughter for her checkup at the pediatrician we were told that if she wanted soda, allow her to have one or two a week, non-diet, because the substances in the sugar-free sodas were too questionable.

And apple's on the list of things that you should buy organic, so the juice info makes sense. Peanut butter's another problematic food; it's laden with pesticides because of the way peanuts are grown. And we can't switch to rice and water because rice has been implicated in the melamine scare! :roll:

Leslie
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Leslie, your art is amazing. I love the expressiveness in people's faces. You read them very well.

There is concern about GMO foods, and I'm trying to recall if it was Dr. Mercola <www.Mercola.com> who said there'd been a study showing potential danger with it.

I'm told that Europeans are really up in arms about it. More power to them!
 

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Thanks, Deb! I love painting people! And the French ones are so typically French in their gestures and expressions that it's fun to depict them and try to catch that aspect of them.

I'm very concerned about GMO foods as well; the technique is a far cry from the old hybridization efforts. And I noted that there were some issues with accidental crosspollination of crops which caused reactions in people who had allergies. Can't think of specifics right now; it's just an impression. But any time you're artifcially folding in pest resistance in a food product it seems as though there would have to be issues.

I have checked out Mercola.com in the past, but was concerned that so much of what's written there seemed to be tied to marketing a product. I feel a lot more comfortable with individuals/organizations who have no economic axe to grind and don't make any more money if their advice is followed. Ran into that with stock brokers, too!

Leslie
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Yes, Mercola does some marketing, and has stated that it all goes to support his huge web site, that he takes nothing from it. (Wonder what his salary is for managing the site? He mentioned once how much time he puts into it, and it would not seem to leave him time to see patients.) I believe he said it's the largest holistic medicine site and gets lots of hits, so he needs a pretty powerful server.

He gets on a political bandwagon once in a while, too, but I subscribe to his newsletter anyway, and get some good information from it. I just know what the ads look like by now and don't open them. When I have, I can sometimes find the product for less somewhere else.
 
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