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Written by:
Laurinda Morris, DVM
Danville Veterinary Clinic
Danville , Ohio

This week I had the first case in history of raisin toxicity ever seen at MedVet. My patient was a 56-pound, 5 yr old male neutered lab mix that ate half a canister of raisins sometime between 7:30 AM and 4:30 PM on Tuesday. He started with vomiting, diarrhea and shaking about 1 AM on Wednesday but the owner didn't call my emergency service until 7 AM .

I had heard somewhere about raisins AND grapes causing acute Renal failure but hadn't seen any formal paper on the subject. We had her bring the dog in immediately. In the meantime, I called the ER service at MedVet, and the doctor there was like me - had heard something about it, but . . . Anyway, we contacted the ASPCA National Animal Poison Control Center and they said to give I V fluids at 1 1/2 times maintenance and watch the kidney values for the next 48-72 hours.

The dog's BUN (blood urea nitrogen level) was already at 32 (normal less than 27) and creatinine! Over 5 ( 1.9 is the high end of normal). Both are monitors of kidney function in the bloodstream. We placed an IV catheter and started the fluids. Rechecked the renal values at 5 PM and the BUN was over 40 and creatinine over 7 with no urine production after a liter of fluids. At the point I felt the dog was in acute renal failure and sent him on to MedVet for a urinary catheter to monitor urine output overnight as well as overnight care.

He started vomiting again overnight at MedVet and his renal values have continued to increase daily. He produced urine when given lasix as a diuretic. He was on 3 different anti-vomiting medications and they still couldn't control his vomiting. Today his urine output decreased again, his BUN was over 120, his creatinine was at 10, his phosphorus was very elevated and his blood pressure, which had been staying around 150, skyrocketed to 220. He continued to vomit and the owners elected to Euthanize.

This is a very sad case - great dog, great owners who had no idea raisins could be a toxin. Please alert everyone you know who has a dog of this very serious risk. Poison control said as few as 7 raisins or grapes could be toxic. Many people I know give their dogs grapes or raisins as treats including our ex-handler's. Any exposure should give rise to immediate concern.

Onions, chocolate, cocoa and macadamia nuts can be fatal, too.

Even if you don't have a dog, you might have friends who do. This is worth passing on to them.
Confirmation from Snopes about the above.
http://www.snopes.com/critters/crusader/raisins.asp
 

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What a sad sad story...................
Thanks for the alert..........I already know about raisins and the other stuff but it is a good reminder with a horrifiic ending..............My heart breaks for the owners...........
 

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thanks Nancy...i always remind my teenagers of all toxic food
especially raisens , grapes and onions.
 

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Thanks Nancy for the reminder....

I hope others are reading this post who may not know about this.
I discovered my boys 10-12 years ago were giving our sheltie grapes while they ate theirs....Sure glad I stopped them....I didn't know at the time they were toxic to dogs...just didn't want them allowing the dog to eat when they were.

Sad story of something sooooo preventable....if only they had known!
:cry:
 

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Thanks Nancy. I didn't know that. Cacao doesn't normally get people food. I will say she has had some popcorn. She really likes it. I hope that doesn't hurt her.
 

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Thanks for the info. Is there anywhere that I can get a comprehensive list of ALL things that are toxic to dogs? I think I saw something somewhere that listed bushes and plants that are very bad. In particular I'm worried about some ivy that is in our back. In theory Casey gets nothing but dog food and treats but he will chew (and sometimes ingest) anything he can get in his little mouth. I'd just as soon pull all the ivy if any quantities are toxic.
 

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Here are three links to good information about things poisonous to dogs.
There have been several discussions on the forum about this....you could search here, too.

HERE ARE THE LINKS TO MORE INFO ABOUT POISONS.....

http://dogs.about.com/cs/disableddogs/f ... onlist.htm

http://www.aspca.org/site/PageServer?pa ... u33.app20b

http://www.vetinfo4dogs.com/dtoxin.html ... 0in%20Dogs

Personally, I wouldn't pull all the ivy up,
unless your pup keeps trying to eat it....I
have pretty much steered clear of the
plants, just being out there telling them NO
every time they go for something....
teaching them to stay out of the beds etc....
they are learning pretty well...
Just don't leave gardening gloves on the grass,
when you turn around to pick them up.....NOPE! GONE!!
Acorns are a problem....
we have thousands,but they'd have to ingest
an awful lot to get really sick....
and the same thing has helped...
telling them NO when they are even just eyeing one.....

Idid pull up a Moon Flower,
it is very toxic to both dogs and people.
It is a hallucinagen and some teens around
here have nearly died trying to get high off it....
( well, they did get high, sick and ended up in emergency rooms....I guess you smoke it)
It is also called something else, gypsum weed I think.
Too bad, it's flower is real pretty and blooms
around 4 pm until 10 pm or so.....big blossoms...like moons.
:roll:
Here is one I had last year before
I saw a report on the news about the kids are using this for.
...it mentioned it was also poisonous to dogs.
Shame its a cool plant...
It has a very spiny seed pod and thats where the trouble is
....it is the size of a golf ball or a little larger....





We must be vigilent to stay on top of what they are into....Like kids...
8)
 
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