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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What are the differences between AKC and ACA??? Why is one "better" than the other? Is it simply "prestige" or what?? I know that ALAA is for labradoodles...and that they aren't yet recognized as a breed by the AKC....But, Breeders........are both your poodles and labs registered with AKC, or whomever? i would think having the pedigree papers and all would be partly why they can be so expensive, yes?
When we had Irish Setters, I was only aware of the AKC.

Just Curious...........
8)
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Hmmm......no replies to my curious thoughts and questions. Is this a sticky subject?? :shock: If so, Oops!! Sorry, I didn't know. :oops:
By my "prestige" comment, I guess I mean,
~are they in competition with each other and therefore one has a reputation as being somehow "better" and the only one with whom to register???
Maybe I shouldn't have asked.
I understand the value of having a dog registered....and lines and quality of the lines kept track of and all.....
Could someone PM me to set me straight?
Again, sorry, if I shouldn't have talked about this. :oops:

Never mind. :(
 

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I'd respond, but I wouldn't know what the heck I'm talking about! :oops: To me, my doods are my doods and having them "recognized" wouldn't change anything. If anyone attacks you or gets upset that you asked.....I've got your back! :lol:
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks, folks!
I appreciate the responses.....
Am off to do a million things....Coco is looking forlorn! :cry:
 

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There is a reality to registrations giving some semblance of 'legitimacy' to a dog and its pedigree or background. AKC only acknowledges their versions of 'purebred' dogs, so of course Labradoodles don't fit. But the AKC is also a really political organization which works to protect its power base, or reputation, and there's an ugly underside to it. Yet most people think it is a sign of legitimacy. So when a breeder leased my (AKC) STandard Poodle to have a litter of poodles, she had no idea that the puppies wouldn't easily sell, since they weren't eligible to be registered with AKC. There's some hint or fear that there's a non-poodle in the pedigree, if the male isn't registered with AKC.

The ILAA/ALAA is a whole other question but I've chosen to not join there club or registry so I can't speak about it with any knowledge at all. I do like that with breeding a hybrid dog that is OUTSIDE of the AKC, I am judged on my own merits as a breeder, and not whether or not I go along with the AKC.

does this help your questioning at all?
 

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gene said:
I'd respond, but I wouldn't know what the heck I'm talking about! :oops: To me, my doods are my doods and having them "recognized" wouldn't change anything. If anyone attacks you or gets upset that you asked.....I've got your back! :lol:
DITTO
 

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I just found this post and, although, I am trying to make just quick notes here and there, I wanted to respond to this.
In my opinion, registration has its place, and the initial purpose for registration was a valid one. However, like many things, policies have been implemented to change the nature of their vision or goals. Registration and pedigrees have become weapons to beat over the heads of those without papers and registrations.
I can only speak for myself, but I started out thinking that registration was very special because it gave you a good background into your dog's genetics and because I found it interesting. I felt that any organization working for the betterment of a breed (ALAA) was a worthwhile organization and I wanted to support their goals with my membership.
I have changed my mind.
Some of these organizations are "for profit" ... that sould give you an idea about where their loyalties lie. (I am not against "for profit" organizations, it's just that knowing this should put the issues in perspective.)
First, I take issue with ALAA's less than helpful response and business practices through the California Law fiasco, trying to put doodle breeders out of business. It is a long story, but I will state that I have totally lost respect for their organization.
The AKC, you would think, stands for honesty and protection of the breeds...not so. As an example, (again, just MY experiences) I bought a dog, advertised as a puppy from and AKC registered line. After I paid a premium price for the dog, I was told that, "whoops! the dog's breeder was duped by HER breeder and we had the wrong paperwork..." so my dog could not be registered and I could not breed him to other registered pure bred dogs of his type. Too bad, too sad.
Well, after YEARS of forcing the issue I was able to get DNA verification THROUGH AKC of the true pedigree...I asked the AKC to change the records to reflect the correct pedigree so that I could register my dog. They refused. Why? Because I was not a member of AKC and the breeder who filed the false documents had to AGREE to the amendment or they could do nothing. (See? That's where the "for profit" gets in the way of doing what's right.) Even with THEIR DNA results as proof, they would not consider my request for corrected pedigree information. (By the way, my breeder still has her dog registered...under the WRONG pedigree through AKC and also through ALAA.)
So, to me, it appears that a registered dog is just that...a dog with papers. No better, no worse, than one without papers. The papers prove nothing.
I would be willing to bet everything I own that if they DNA matched the AKC dogs now, perhaps only 20% would prove to be accurate pedigrees. In fact, now they are able to DNA test dogs to find out what breeds are in the dog...now THAT would be an interesting study with "pure bred" dogs, wouldn't it?
It used to be that through regisgration and conformation, you could "prove" the health and quality of your dogs, so the competitions and conformations were considered a mark of excellence. Well, now, we have scientific testing for genetic diseases...to me, science trumps competition. The proof of a good dog can't lie in the pedigree or registration...not any more. The proof of a good dog lies in health testing, temperament, intelligence and qualities important to the owners.
Paper, schmaper.
I dont' know anything about the ACA...in fact, I know little about any of the organizations...I just don't feel the need to be a loyal follower. I know what I produce and why. I will leave the registrations and competitions to those who value them.
I WILL say, however, that the AKC stood firmly in opposition of that crummy CA law and they defeated it...and that brought my level of respect for their organization and power up a few notches.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Jacque,


Oh, Wow! Thanks for the information....Very interesting. It is too bad things can't stay on track and be a reliable and reputable service to folks...things seem to get so perverted as time goes by. The science of DNA and all the genetic and disorder testing would be good enough for me....wish it weren't all so expensive. I see that that is more the reason for expensive dogs, rather than having schmapers!!

Thanks again,
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:D Yep, I feel that my DNA records are far more accurate than the papers that most people are relying on.
It is funny, too, that people think if a dog is AKC registered (or other organization) then they have a great dog...hmmmm, if only it was so. :wink:
 

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Here is some information on both organizations. I hope this helps!
The American Kennel Club, Inc. (American Kennel Club) is the oldest and largest dog registry in the United States. The American Canine Association, Inc. is the second largest dog registry in the United States. Both AKC and ACA have dog shows, but AKC has a greater number of dog shows.

As of 04/12/2020, AKC’s standard registration rate for a dog is $37.99. AKC’s dog registration certificates are 3.5-inch (height) x 8.5-inches (width) printed on heavy weight paper. ACA’s standard registration rate for a dog is $19.00. ACA’s dog certificates are 11-inch (height) x 8.5-inches (width) printed on certificate paper with a gold seal.

AKC charges late-penalty fees for dog registrations:
LATE FEE – OVER 6 MONTHS AFTER LITTER REGISTERED $4.99
LATE FEE – OVER 12 MONTHS AFTER LITTER REGISTERED $35.00
LATE FEE – OVER 24 MONTHS AFTER LITTER REGISTERED $65.00
AKC’s late fees can be viewed on Fee Schedule – American Kennel Club.

ACA does not charge customers any late-penalty fees for dog registrations.

AKC charges an additional $10.00 per registration if the customer wishes to add a co-owner to the dog. ACA adds one or more co-owners to a dog free of charge.

AKC’s microchip division for lost & found protection is AKC Reunite (Pet Microchips | Lost Pet Recovery | AKC Reunite). ACA’s microchip division for lost & found protection is MARRS Microchip (ACA's Microchip Animal Rapid Recovery Services (M.A.R.R.S.) - Home Page). AKC charges customers $54.95 for AKC Registration + lifetime AKC Reunite lost & found coverage. ACA charges customers $19.00 for ACA Registration + lifetime ACA MARRS Microchip lost & found coverage. Both AKC and ACA are participating companies with the American Animal Hospital Association (Participating Microchipping and Pet Recovery Services | AAHA Universal Pet Microchip Lookup).

AKC’s standard litter registration fee is $25.00 plus and additional $2.00 fee per puppy in the litter. ACA’s standard litter registration fee is $18.00 with no additional fees for each puppy in the litter.

AKC charges late-penalty fees for litter registrations:
LATE FEE – OVER 12 MONTHS AFTER LITTER REGISTERED $35.00
LATE FEE – OVER 24 MONTHS AFTER LITTER REGISTERED $65.00
AKC’s late fees can be viewed on Fee Schedule – American Kennel Club.

ACA does not charge customers any late-penalty fees for litter registrations.

ACA also includes lost & found tags with their dog registrations free of charge. The ACA tags have their official seal on one side of the tag. On the other side of the tag is says: “I am lost. Please call” and a toll-free 1-800 number along with a unique ID number exclusively for the dog. The 1-800 numbers are answered by live operators 24 hours a day / 7 days a week to reunite the lost dog with the ACA owner. There is no additional annual or lifetime fees for this service. It is included in the initial $19.00 ACA registration fee.
 
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