Labradoodle Forums banner

1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
73 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
My Callie (F1 Standard) just turned 7 months old this week.

She has a condition known as an 'inverted vulva'. Basically, her private parts are 'innie' instead of 'outie'. Our vet has said that very often the hormone surge of the first heat will correct this, and has strongly recommended I allow Callie to have her first heat before having her spayed. (Be assured I intend to spay her - I've worked in animal rescue too long to do otherwise). She says that dogs with inverted vulvas who are spayed before their first heat are more susceptible to urinary tract infections and vaginitis, so I am inclined to follow her recommendation.

For those of you who have similar doodles and have spayed after the first heat or not at all, how old was your doodle when she had her first heat? And what exactly should I be watching for (besides every male dog in the neighbourhood sitting on my back doorstep!)? :?

Thanks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,506 Posts
I hope the vet's right about that correcting itself. That would be great!
Usually a large breed female pup has her first heat cycle at anywhere from 6- 12 months. 9-10 months being pretty average.

You will likely notice her licking herself more than usual, might see a bloody discharge, and she might even act a bit "off" as her hormones are changed. Some dogs leave no question as they bleed enough to leave spots on the floor when they sit... others keep themselves so clean that unless you see the increase in cleaning you could actually miss it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
235 Posts
Is there any truth to the thought of letting a dog have its first heat cycle before spaying being better for the dog?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,506 Posts
No, other than instances like mentioned in the original post, it's really best to spay your pup at 6 months of age. It's been proven that a pup spayed early has a greatly reduced chance of getting gender specific cancers later in life, and there's no benefit to waiting. Having a female in heat in the house can be a messy ordeal. Having every un-neutered male in a mile radius trying to get in your house can be frustrating and destructive.

Early spaying can save you from all of that.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,005 Posts
I'm not ever going to argue against spaying, especially for reducing cancer risks and unwanted pregnancies. But we have let Hershey have 3 seasons and have never had a random male dog around the yard, and we still do walks around the neighbourhood where she spots while she pees. I do think the must be very very few unneutered males in our area in canada.

To answer your question about 1 heat, from what i have read it is raises the risk of cancer only very slightly. a second season raises it by a larger amount, and after 3 seasons subsequent spay doesnt really reduce the risk at all.
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top